Marc Daniel Mallet

Marc Daniel Mallet
University of Tasmania · Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS)

PhD

About

31
Publications
7,603
Reads
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317
Citations
Introduction
My current research focuses on Southern Ocean aerosols and clouds. I am using recent ship, aircraft, satellite and ground-based observations to understand deficiencies in climate model simulations of precipitation and the radiative balance over the Southern Ocean.
Additional affiliations
October 2019 - present
University of Tasmania
Position
  • Researcher
May 2019 - September 2019
December 2017 - April 2019
Université Paris-Est Créteil Val de Marne - Université Paris 12
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
January 2013 - March 2017
Queensland University of Technology
Field of study
  • Atmospheric Physics
February 2012 - December 2012
January 2010 - December 2012

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
Full-text available
There is a lack of knowledge of how biomass burning aerosols in the tropics age, including those in the fire-prone Northern Territory in Australia. This paper reports chemical characterization of fresh and aged aerosols monitored during the 1-month-long SAFIRED (Savannah Fires in the Early Dry Season) field study, with an emphasis on the chemical s...
Article
Full-text available
The SAFIRED (Savannah Fires in the Early Dry Season) campaign took place from 29 May until 30 June 2014 at the Australian Tropical Atmospheric Research Station (ATARS) in the Northern Territory, Australia. The purpose of this campaign was to investigate emissions from fires in the early dry season in northern Australia. Measurements were made of bi...
Article
Full-text available
The AEROCLO-sA (AErosol, RadiatiOn and CLOuds in southern Africa) project investigates the role of aerosols on the regional climate of southern Africa. This is a unique environment where natural and anthropogenic aerosols and a semi-permanent and widespread stratocumulus (Sc) cloud deck are found. The project aims to understand the dynamical, chemi...
Article
Full-text available
Measurements of aerosol composition and size distributions were taken during the summer of 2013 at the remote island of Lampedusa in the southern central Mediterranean Sea. These measurements were part of the ChArMEx/ADRIMED (Chemistry and Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate) framework and...
Article
Full-text available
The vast majority of Australia's fires occur in the tropical north of the continent during the dry season. These fires are a significant source of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the region, providing a unique opportunity to investigate the biomass burning aerosol (BBA) in the absence of other sources. CCN concentrations at 0.5 % sup...
Article
Full-text available
Marine ecosystems are important drivers of the global climate system. They emit volatile species into the atmosphere, involved in complex reaction cycles that influence the lifetime of greenhouse gases. Sea spray and marine biogenic aerosols affect Earth's climate by scattering solar radiation and controlling cloud microphysical properties. Here we...
Article
Full-text available
Plain Language Summary Phytoplankton are the “plant” plankton at the base of the ocean food chain. Phytoplankton growth in the Southern Ocean is limited by the availability of iron. Deserts and wildfires are two important sources of iron‐bearing particles that can be transported over long distances and deposited on the ocean surface, causing increa...
Preprint
The Southern Ocean radiative bias continues to impact climate and weather models, including the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS). The radiative bias, characterised by too much shortwave radiation reaching the surface, is attributed to the incorrect simulation of cloud frequency and phase. In this work, we use k-means...
Article
Full-text available
This commentary paper from the recently formed International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Southern Hemisphere Working Group outlines key issues in atmospheric composition research that particularly impact the Southern Hemisphere. In this article, we present a broad overview of many of the challenges for understanding atmospheric chemistry in...
Preprint
Full-text available
Optical particle counters (OPC) are widely used to measure the aerosol particle number size distribution at atmospheric ambient conditions and over a large size range. Their measurement principle is based on the dependence of light scattering on particle size. However, this dependence is not monotonic at all sizes and light scattering also depends...
Article
The impacts of poor air quality on human health are becoming more apparent. Businesses and governments are implementing technologies and policies in order to improve air quality. Despite this the PM10 air quality in the mining town of Moranbah, Australia, has worsened since measurements commenced in 2011. The annual average PM10 concentrations duri...
Article
Full-text available
The aerosol-driven radiative effects on marine low-level cloud represent a large uncertainty in climate simulations, in particular over the Southern Ocean, which is also an important region for sea spray aerosol production. Observations of sea spray aerosol organic enrichment and the resulting impact on water uptake over the remote Southern Hemisph...
Article
Full-text available
The aerosol driven radiative effects on marine low-level cloud represent a large uncertainty in climate simulations, in particular over the Southern Ocean, which is also an important region for sea spray aerosol production. Observations of sea spray aerosol organic enrichment and the resulting impact on water uptake over the remote southern hemisph...
Article
Full-text available
Internally and externally mixed aerosols present significant challenges in assessing the hygroscopicity of each aerosol component. This study presents a new sampling technique which uses differences in volatility to separate mixtures and directly examine their respective composition and hygroscopic contribution. A shared thermodenuder and unheated...
Article
Savanna fires contribute significantly to global aerosol loading and hence to the earth's radiative budget. Modelling of the climatic impact of these aerosols is made difficult due to a lack of knowledge of their size distribution. Australia is the third largest source of global carbon emissions from biomass burning, with emissions dominated by tro...
Article
The emission factors (EFs) for a broad range of semivolatile organic chemicals (SVOCs) from subtropical eucalypt forest and tropical savannah fires were determined for the first time from in-situ investigations. Significantly higher (t test, P < 0.01) EFs (µg kg-1 dry fuel, gas + particle-associated) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (∑13 PAHs)...
Article
Full-text available
The SAFIRED (Savannah Fires in the Early Dry Season) campaign took place from 29th of May, 2014 until the 30th June, 2014 at the Australian Tropical Atmospheric Research Station (ATARS) in the Northern Territory, Australia. The purpose of this campaign was to investigate emissions from fires in the early dry season in northern Australia. Measuremen...
Article
Full-text available
Marine nitrogen fixation is co-limited by the supply of iron (Fe) and phosphorus in large regions of the global ocean. The deposition of soluble aerosol Fe can initiate nitrogen fixation and trigger toxic algal blooms in nitrate-poor tropical waters. We present dry season soluble Fe data from the Savannah Fires in the Early Dry Season (SAFIRED) cam...
Article
Full-text available
The vast majority of Australia's fires occur in the tropical north of the continent during the dry season. These fires are a significant source of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the region, providing a unique opportunity to investigate the biomass burning aerosol (BBA) in the absence of other sources. CCN concentrations at 0.5 % sup...
Article
Full-text available
There is a lack of knowledge of how biomass burning aerosols in the tropics age, including those in the fire-prone Northern Territory in Australia. This paper reports chemical characterization and aging of aerosols monitored during the one month long SAFIRED (Savannah Fires in the Early Dry Season) field study, with an emphasis on chemical signatur...
Article
Full-text available
Marine nitrogen fixation is co-limited by the supply of iron and phosphorus in large areas of the global ocean. Up to 75 % of marine nitrogen fixation may be limited by iron supply due to the relatively high iron requirements of planktonic diazotrophs (Berman-Frank et al., 2001). The deposition of soluble aerosol iron can initiate nitrogen fixation...
Article
Full-text available
Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles produced from the ocean surface in regions of biological activity can vary greatly in size, number and composition, and in their influence on cloud formation. Algal species such as phytoplankton can alter the SSA composition. Numerous studies have investigated nascent SSA properties, but all of these have focused o...
Article
Prescribed burnings are conducted in Queensland each year from August until November aiming to decrease the impact of bushfire hazards and maintain the health of vegetation. This study reports chemical characteristics of the ambient aerosol, with a focus on source apportionment of the organic aerosol (OA) fraction, during the prescribed biomass bur...
Article
Full-text available
These SOAP project Pacific Ocean measurements reveal that phytoplankton blooms with sunny conditions make possible secondary organic contribution to ultrafine particles size and composition, and thus on cloud formation ability, and finally on climate. This is in agreement with other biologically active region observations about the presence of seco...
Article
Full-text available
These Pacific Ocean measurements reveal that phytoplankton blooms with sunny conditions make possible secondary organic contribution to ultrafine particles size and composition, and thus on cloud formation ability, and finally on climate. This is in agreement with other biologically active region observations about the presence of secondary organic...
Article
Full-text available
The Surface Ocean Aerosol Production (SOAP) study was undertaken in February/ March 2012 in the biologically active waters of the Chatham Rise, NZ. Aerosol hygroscopicity and volatility were examined with a volatility hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyser. These observations confirm results from other hygroscopicity-based studies tha...

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