Manus Thoen

Manus Thoen
Enza Zaden · Phytopathology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

16
Publications
5,829
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398
Citations
Citations since 2017
10 Research Items
340 Citations
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Introduction
Within the department of phytopathology at Enza Zaden we study how plants cope with biotic stresses. Our main aim is to find innovative ways to discover and eventually breed for new resistant vegetable varieties. My team focusses on the Solanceae crops Tomato and Pepper.
Additional affiliations
June 2014 - present
Wageningen University & Research
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Full-text available
Piercing-sucking insects cause severe damage in crops. Breeding for host-plant resistance can significantly reduce the yield losses caused by these insects, but host-plant resistance is a complex trait that is difficult to phenotype quickly and reliably. Current phenotyping methods mainly focus on labor-intensive and time-consuming end-point measur...
Article
Full-text available
Plants are exposed to combinations of various biotic and abiotic stresses, but stress responses are usually investigated for single stresses only. Here, we investigated the genetic architecture underlying plant responses to 11 single stresses and several of their combinations by phenotyping 350 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. A set of 214 000 sing...
Article
Full-text available
Association mapping is rapidly becoming an important method to explore the genetic architecture of complex traits in plants and offers unique opportunities for studying resistance to insect herbivores. Recent studies indicate that there is a trade-off between resistance against generalist and specialist insects. Most studies, however, use a targete...
Article
Full-text available
Host-plant resistance to insects like thrips and aphids is a complex trait that is difficult to phenotype quickly and reliably. Here, we introduce novel hardware and software to facilitate insect choice assays and automate the acquisition and analysis of movement tracks. The hardware consists of an array of individual T-mazes allowing simultaneous...
Data
Automatically generated statistical analysis by the EthoAnalysis software using the F1 settings. This represents the most extensive format. Optional are reports with only the main results.
Article
Full-text available
Environmental sequencing shows that plants harbor complex communities of microbes that vary across environments. However, many approaches for mapping plant genetic variation to microbe‐related traits were developed in the relatively simple context of binary host‐microbe interactions under controlled conditions. Recent advances in sequencing and sta...
Data
Table S1 Summary of the climate variables mined for this study that vary along geographical gradients. Table S2 Bayesian phylogenetic mixed model analysis to assess differences in flowering time without and after vernalization and geographical gradients. Fig. S1 Geographic distribution of Arabidopsis thaliana accessions from the Hapmap population...
Data
Data S1 Data used for downstream analysis. Columns A&B present the unique identifiers for each accession. Column C represents the genetic groups (See M&M, section: Genetic diversity in European accessions from the Hapmap population). Columns D‐J present the variables that capture the response of each accession to the corresponding stress (See M&M,...
Data
Data S2 Results from the MTMM GWAs analysis. MAF (Minor allele frequency). PCp1 = First principal component for traits that were resistant in summer annuals. PCp2 = First principal component for traits that were resistant in winter annuals. MTMM P‐values for a full model, trait specific and common are presented. Details of the different models are...
Article
Full-text available
Plants are sessile organisms and, consequently, are exposed to a plethora of stresses in their local habitat. As a result, different populations of a species are subject to different selection pressures leading to adaptation to local conditions and intraspecific divergence. The annual brassicaceous plant Arabidopsis thaliana is an attractive model...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Piercing-sucking insects are major vectors of plant viruses causing significant yield losses in crops. Functional genomics of plant resistance to these insects would greatly benefit from the availability of highthroughput, quantitative phenotyping methods. Results: We have developed an automated video tracking platform that quantifies a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Thrips (a.k.a. thunderflies) are minute slender piercing-sucking insects represented by over 5000 species in the order Thysanoptera. The western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, is a devastating pest insect on numerous crop species worldwide. Besides the direct damage inflicted by feeding on cell contents, they transmit pathogenic viruses...
Article
Herbivore-induced plant volatiles are often involved in direct and indirect plant defence against herbivores. Linalool is a common floral scent and found to be released from leaves by many plants after herbivore attack. In this study, a linalool/nerolidol synthase, FaNES1, was overexpressed in the plastids of chrysanthemum plants (Chrysanthemum mor...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
1) Developing (high throughput) phenotyping tools to monitor hostplant resistance to western flower thrips. 2) Applying these tools to find novel leads to thrips resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana.
Project
We know from our experiences in agriculture that resistance is seldom durable. On average, pests overcome resistance traits within three to five years. However, in nature, resistance alleles can persist for millions of years and retain functionality. Why is this? One likely factor is that agricultural fields are simple monocultures, often dominated by single pests. Nature, on the other hand, is complex with dozens of host plants sharing thousands of microbial associates. Recent work has unravelled how long-term variation at one particular resistance gene is maintained by these complex and diffuse interactions. Coevolutionary dynamics on resistance genes may be integrated across groups of species. In this work, I aim to determine the extent to which selection on resistance is shared among co-occurring host plants by exploring whether they share the same evolutionary histories for a variety of resistance genes. I will use natural populations of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and two related naturally co-occurring Brassicaceae species to perform comparative genomics on resistance genes. If these species share the same evolutionary histories in relation to resistance genes, this may inform the use of community complexity as a means of extending the durability of resistance. As a consequence, the use of detrimental pesticides can be greatly reduced in future agricultural practice.