Manuela Truebano

Manuela Truebano
University of Plymouth | UoP · Marine Biology and Ecology Research Centre

PhD

About

46
Publications
5,269
Reads
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496
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2006 - June 2007
Swansea University
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (46)
Article
Pooling of samples in proteomics experiments might help overcome resource constraints when many individuals are analysed. The measured biological variation should be reduced giving increased power to detect treatment differences. Pooling has been advocated in microarray work but there are few tests of its potential in proteomics. In this study, we...
Article
Our ability to predict animal responses to temperature changes is currently limited and more sensitive methods of identifying mechanisms, limits and thresholds are required. Antarctic marine ectotherms are excellent candidates for the study of warming seawater temperatures as they represent some of the most stenothermal species on Earth. They live...
Article
Future oceans are predicted to contain less oxygen than at present. This is because oxygen is less soluble in warmer water and predicted stratification will reduce mixing. Hypoxia in marine environments is thus likely to become more widespread in marine environments and understanding species-responses is important to predicting future impacts on bi...
Article
Full-text available
Heart function is a key component of whole-organismal physiology. Bioimaging is commonly, but not exclusively, used for quantifying heart function in transparent individuals, including early developmental stages of aquatic animals, many of which are transparent. However, central limitations of many imaging-related methods is a lack of transferabili...
Article
Embryonic development is a complex process involving the co-ordinated onset and integration of multiple morphological features and physiological functions. While the molecular basis of morphological development in embryos is relatively well known for traditional model species, the molecular underpinning of the development of physiological functions...
Article
Physiological plasticity may confer an ability to deal with the effect of rapid climate change on aquatic ectotherms. However, plasticity induced by one stressor may only be adaptive in situ if it generates cross-tolerance to other stressors. Understanding the consequences of thermal acclimation on hypoxia thresholds is vital to understanding futur...
Article
Thermal stress is a potentially important selective agent in intertidal marine habitats, but the role that thermal tolerance might play in local adaptation across shore height has been underexplored. Northwest Spain is home to two morphologically distinct ecotypes of the periwinkle Littorina saxatilis, separated by shore height and subject to subst...
Article
Full-text available
The adaptive value of phenotypic plasticity for performance under single stressors is well documented. However, plasticity may only truly be adaptive in the natural multifactorial environment if it confers resilience to stressors of a different nature, a phenomenon known as cross‐tolerance. An understanding of the mechanistic basis of cross‐toleran...
Article
Aquatic animals increasingly encounter environmental hypoxia due to climate-related warming and/or eutrophication. Although acute warming typically reduces performance under hypoxia, the ability of organisms to modulate hypoxic performance via thermal acclimation is less understood. Here, we review the literature and ask whether hypoxic performance...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence of alloparental care during the incubation stage has largely been demonstrated for species that incubate their offspring externally in a nest. Alloparental care in these species generally consists of the rearing of mixed broods which contain a low proportion of "foreign" young alongside the host's own offspring. However, many animals, incl...
Article
Osmoregulation is a key regulatory function in animals inhabiting brackish waters or areas subject to considerable salinity change, such as estuaries. While our understanding of osmoregulation in adult crustaceans is relatively good, our knowledge of how osmoregulatory ability develops during ontogeny is not well documented. In indirect developers,...
Article
Full-text available
Interspecific hybridisation can alter fitness-related traits, including the response to pathogens, yet immunity is rarely investigated as a potential driver of hybrid zone dynamics, particularly in invertebrates. We investigated the immune response of mussels from a sympatric population at Croyde Bay, within the hybrid zone of Mytilus edulis and My...
Article
Coastal ecosystems, including estuaries, are increasingly pressured by expanding hypoxic regions as a result of human activities such as increased release of nutrients and global warming. Hypoxia is often defined as oxygen concentrations below 2 mL O2 L-1. However, taxa vary markedly in their sensitivity to hypoxia and can be affected by a broad sp...
Article
Full-text available
The ability of organisms to respond to predation threat by exhibiting induced defenses is well documented, but studies on the potential mechanistic basis for such responses are scarce. Here, we examine the transcriptomic response to predator kairomones of two functionally distinct developmental stages in embryos of the aquatic snail Radix balthica:...
Chapter
There is a resurgence of interest in using phenotypic plasticity, ‘the environmentally sensitive production of alternative phenotypes by given genotypes’, as a framework in the study of evolutionary biology. The term developmental plasticity describes a more specific strand of investigation dealing with how alterations to developmental processes an...
Article
With both global surface temperatures and the incidence and intensity of extreme temperature events projected to increase, the assessment of species' sensitivities to chronic and acute changes in temperature has become crucial. Sensitivity predictions are based predominantly on adult responses, despite the fact that early life stages may be more vu...
Article
Full-text available
The prevalence of hypoxic areas in coastal waters is predicted to increase and lead to reduced biodiversity. While the adult stages of many estuarine invertebrates can cope with short periods of hypoxia, it remains unclear whether that ability is present if animals are bred and reared under chronic hypoxia. We firstly investigated the effect of mod...
Article
Full-text available
Molluscs are the second most species-rich phylum in the animal kingdom, yet only 11 genomes of this group have been published so far. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the pulmonate freshwater snail Radix auricularia. Six whole genome shotgun libraries with different layouts were sequenced. The resulting assembly comprises 4,823 scaffol...
Article
Environmental hypoxia is becoming more prevalent in aquatic environments due to eutrophication and climate change. While the ecological and physiological responses of marine animals to hypoxia have received considerable attention, the molecular responses remain largely undetermined. We have assembled a transcriptome for the brackishwater amphipod,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Molluscs are the second most species-rich phylum in the animal kingdom, yet only eleven genomes of this group have been published so far. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the pulmonate freshwater snail Radix auricularia . Six whole genome shotgun libraries with different layouts were sequenced. The resulting assembly comprises 4,823 sc...
Article
Environmental change can dramatically alter the development of aquatic organisms. While the effect of such change on physiological and morphological ontogenies is becoming clearer, the molecular mechanisms underpinning them are largely unexplored. Characterizing these mechanisms is often limited by the lack of molecular resources. We have applied I...
Article
At all but the lowest latitudes, photoperiod varies through the year, resulting in seasonal variation in coastal primary productivity. This leads to a pronounced seasonality in the physiology of most primary consumers, particularly in the seas around Antarctica,which are amongst themost seasonal on the planet. However, higher trophic levels have a...
Article
The proteome can be regarded as a molecular phenotype, as changes in protein expression patterns have a direct effect on organismal physiology and fitness. The analysis of the proteome can therefore be an invaluable tool for our understanding of the mechanisms underlying phenotypic changes in response to environmental change. However, proteomic stu...
Article
Full-text available
The injection of anthropogenically-produced CO2 into the atmosphere will lead to an increase in temperature and a decrease in pH at the surface of the oceans by 2100. Marine intertidal organisms possess the ability to cope in the short term with environmental fluctuations exceeding predicted values. However, how they will cope with chronic exposure...
Data
Future oceans are predicted to contain less oxygen than at present. This is because oxygen is less soluble in warmer water and predicted stratification will reduce mixing. Hypoxia in marine environments is thus likely to become more widespread in marine environments and understanding species-responses is important to predicting future impacts on bi...
Article
Full-text available
The European, native or flat oyster, Ostrea edulis, has been the subject of human-mediated translocation and aquaculture in Europe for centuries and may have diluted or masked natural population genetic structure. Samples of O. edulis from 10 sites in Scotland and The Netherlands, Brittany and Norway were collected and genotyped at up to six micros...

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