Manuel J. Macía

Manuel J. Macía
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid | UAM · Department of Biology

PhD

About

191
Publications
165,430
Reads
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3,930
Citations
Introduction
My research focuses on understanding the patterns, processes and mechanisms that determine the floristic composition, spatial distribution based on environmental variables, and traditional knowledge of woody-plants in Neotropical rainforests. I am particularly interested in the integration of eco-floristic and ethnobotanical studies to preserve the biocultural diversity.
Additional affiliations
December 2008 - present
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
April 2005 - June 2005
University of Turku
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2000 - December 2008
Spanish National Research Council
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (191)
Article
Full-text available
Disentangling the relative importance of different biodiversity drivers (i.e., climate, edaphic, historical factors, or human impact) to predict plant species richness at the local scale is one of the most important challenges in ecology. Biodiversity modelling is a key tool for the integration of these drivers and the predictions generated are ess...
Article
Full-text available
Measurement(s) Bark thickness • Leaf area • Leaf aluminium (Al) content per leaf dry mass • Specific leaf area • Leaf calcium (Ca) content per leaf dry mass • Leaf carbon (C) content per leaf dry mass • Leaf carbon (C) isotope signature (delta 13 C) • Leaf compoundness • Leaf dry mass per leaf fresh mass (leaf dry matter content, LDMC) • Leaf magne...
Article
Full-text available
A vast literature indicates that environment plays a paramount role in determining floristic composition in tropical forests. However, it remains unclear which are the most important environmental factors and their relative effect across different spatial scales, plant life forms or forest types. This study reviews the state of knowledge on the eff...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Spanish biocultural diversity is very rich and varied due to its location, linguistic diversity, and the influence of the different peoples that have passed through the Iberian peninsula throughout history. Nonetheless, industrialization and economic development in Spain resulted in the depopulation of rural areas and the abandonment of most tradit...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies have demonstrated that ecological processes that shape community structure and dynamics change along environmental gradients. However, much less is known about how the emergence of the gradients themselves shape the evolution of species that underlie community assembly. In this study, we address how the creation of novel environments...
Article
Full-text available
Traditional knowledge (TK) of medicinal plants in cities has been poorly studied across different inhabitants’ socioeconomic sectors. We studied the small city of Chachapoyas (~34,000 inhabitants) in the northern Peruvian Andes. We divided the city into three areas according to the socio-economic characteristics of its inhabitants: city center (hig...
Article
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The forests of Amazonia are among the most biodiverse plant communities on Earth. Given the immediate threats posed by climate and land-use change, an improved understanding of how this extraordinary biodiversity is spatially organized is urgently required to develop effective conservation strategies. Most Amazonian tree species are extremely rare...
Article
Tropical forests are the most diverse and productive ecosystems on Earth. While better understanding of these forests is critical for our collective future, until quite recently efforts to measure and monitor them have been largely disconnected. Networking is essential to discover the answers to questions that transcend borders and the horizons of...
Article
Full-text available
Aim We examined tree beta‐diversity in four biogeographical regions with contrasting environmental conditions, latitude, and diversity. We tested: (1) the influence of the species pool on beta‐diversity; (2) the relative contribution of niche‐based and dispersal‐based assembly to beta‐diversity; and (3) differences in the importance of these two as...
Article
What Is the Most Efficient Methodology for Gathering Ethnobotanical Data and for Participant Selection? Medicinal Plants as a Case Study in the Peruvian Andes. The loss of traditional knowledge (TK) invariably continues worldwide and there is an urgent need to document and safeguard it before it vanishes. Researchers need efficient methods to docum...
Article
The forests of Amazonia are among the most biodiverse plant communities on Earth. Given the immediate threats posed by climate and land-use change, an improved understanding of how this extraordinary biodiversity is spatially organized is urgently required to develop effective conservation strategies. Most Amazonian tree species are extremely rare...
Article
Aims To determine whether species that contribute most to a plot’s biomass are the most abundant (high local abundance at plot scale) or the most frequent (occur the most across plots at landscape scale), or both. In the tropical Andes, these patterns may change with elevation. This study assesses the contribution to plot’s above-ground biomass (AG...
Preprint
Full-text available
Biogeographic events occurring in the deep past can contribute to the structure of modern ecological communities. However, little is known about how the emergence of environmental gradients shape the evolution of species that underlie community assembly. In this study, we address how the creation of novel environments lead to community assembly via...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Across the Amazon basin, indigenous communities harbor a deep understanding of their surrounding ecosystems. However, the extent to which humans depend on ecosystem services across different ethnic groups and spatial scales remains poorly understood. The purpose of this study is to understand the role of ecological processes in determining the huma...
Article
Full-text available
More tree species can increase the carbon storage capacity of forests (here referred to as the more species hypothesis) through increased tree productivity and tree abundance resulting from complementarity, but they can also be the consequence of increased tree abundance through increased available energy (more individuals hypothesis). To test thes...
Article
The extent to which historical dispersal, environmental features and geographic barriers shape the phylogenetic structure and turnover of tree communities in northwestern Amazonia at multiple spatial scales remains poorly understood. We used 85 floristically standardized 0.1‐ha plots (DBH ≥ 2.5 cm) distributed in three subregions of northwestern (N...
Article
Full-text available
Our knowledge about the structure and function of Andean forests at regional scales remains limited. Current initiatives to study forests over continental or global scales still have important geographical gaps, particularly in regions such as the tropical and subtropical Andes. In this study, we assessed patterns of structure and tree species dive...
Article
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Many studies have tried to assess the role of both deterministic and stochastic processes in community assembly, yet a lack of consensus exists on which processes are more prevalent and at which spatial scales they operate. To shed light on this issue, we tested two non‐mutually exclusive, scale‐dependent hypotheses: 1) that competitive exclusion d...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical montane forests (TMFs) play an important role as a carbon reservoir at a global scale. However, there is a lack of a comprehensive understanding on the variation in carbon storage across TMF compartments [namely aboveground biomass (AGB), belowground biomass (BGB), and soil organic matter] along altitudinal and environmental gradients and...
Article
Full-text available
Question Dispersal limitations (neutral hypothesis) and deterministic factors (niche hypothesis) shape floristic gradients including between‐site patterns of species’ dominance (co‐dominance). Because their relative importance remains nonetheless poorly known, we ask how their comparative contribution to co‐dominance changes with elevation and geog...
Article
Ethnopharmacological relevance: Through the study of mestizo people that share a common culture in a large geographic region and where traditional knowledge (TK) is still poorly documented, we compared medicinal plant use in the northern Andes of Peru. Aims of the study: (1) To compare patterns of the distribution of TK for a human group living...
Article
Full-text available
It has been suggested that traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) may play a key role in forest conservation. However, empirical studies assessing to what extent TEK is associated with forest conservation compared with other variables are rare. Furthermore, to our knowledge, the spatial overlap of TEK and forest conservation has not been evaluated...
Article
Full-text available
Background Canopy structure, defined by leaf area index (LAI), fractional vegetation cover (FCover) and fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR), regulates a wide range of forest functions and ecosystem services. Spatially consistent field-measurements of canopy structure are however lacking, particularly for the tropics. Me...
Article
Full-text available
Globally, a majority of people use plants as a primary source of healthcare and introduced plants are increasingly discussed as medicine. Protecting this resource for human health depends upon understanding which plants are used and how use patterns will change over time. The increasing use of introduced plants in local pharmacopoeia has been expla...
Data
Introduced medicinal plants with cultivation status. (PDF)
Data
Richness of native and introduced species by province. (PDF)
Data
Treatment target categories and search criteria. (PDF)
Article
Rarity, which is believed to influence extinction risk, can be defined in terms of local abundance, geographical range size and habitat breadth. Phylogenetic patterns in these attributes provide insight into the extent to which rarity and extinction risk are conserved during evolution and the potential for species-level heritability. We evaluated p...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
More than 17,000 of the plant species of the world have been used as medicines. The Mediterranean basin, and specifically Spain, has a great floristic and ethnobotanical richness, comprising its useful flora around 3,000 plant species. This paper studies medicinal plants traditionally used in Spain in order to analyze the sustainability of their ex...
Article
Full-text available
Background Traditional knowledge (TK) has enabled communities to adapt to changes in life conditions over centuries. However, this local context is being dramatically affected by recent changes through globalization and modernization of societies. In this paper we seek to identify socio-economic factors that are related to the knowledge and use of...
Article
Though subsistence hunting in tropical rainforests contributes to local food security and livelihoods, it also constitutes a major challenge to wildlife conservation. In this paper we examine different hunting practices of contemporary Tsimane', an Amazonian indigenous society native to Bolivia, and discuss their potential impact on wildlife. We al...
Article
The well-being of the global human population rests on provisioning services delivered by 12% of the Earth's ∼400,000 plant species1. Plant utilization by humans is influenced by species traits2, 3, 4, but it is not well understood which traits underpin different human needs5. Here, we focus on palms (Arecaceae), one of the most economically import...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Statistical and ecological mechanisms shape species abundance distributions (SADs). A lack of correlation between ecological gradients and SAD shape would suggest that SADs are caused by purely statistical reasons. We evaluated the variation in the shape of SADs for communities in landscapes of differing variable connectivity, environmental he...
Article
Full-text available
The use of both uniform woody plant inventories and laboratory soil analysis methods facilitates data sharing and improves the understanding of large-scale biological patterns in tropical forests. Temporary small 0.1-ha plots, fast and cheap to install, are increasingly employed in the tropics. This study presents a standard protocol for woody plan...
Article
Full-text available
The Chocó biodiversity hotspot is one of the most biodiverse and threatened regions on earth, yet the traditional knowledge (TK) of its inhabitants about biodiversity remains little studied. The Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) aims to integrate different knowledge systems, including scientific and TK, to as...
Article
The transmission of traditional knowledge (TK) depends largely on the ability of people to preserve and learn new knowledge. Different and opposing evidence about loss, persistence and generation of TK has been reported, but cross-cultural comparisons are notably missing. We interviewed 2050 informants at 25 localities in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru an...
Article
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Los pasados días 29 y 30 de octubre 2015, se celebró en el Real Jardín Botánico de Madrid, España, la II edición de reunión anual de REDTROP, red temática en biología tropical de la Asociación Española de de Ecología Terrestre (AEET). Entre los dos días, y como en la ocasión anterior en Granada en octubre de 2014, hubo buen ambiente, ganas de colab...
Article
AimOligarchic patterns can vary from weak (i.e. little difference between rare and common species) to strong (i.e. a set of dominant species is immediately evident). Our aim was to understand the relationships between the strength of the oligarchic patterns, diversities (alpha, beta and gamma), and five potential causes (elevational variability, so...
Chapter
Full-text available
Los primeros naturalistas europeos que visitaron la región tropical americana, en los siglos XVIII y XIX, ya nos llamaron la atención sobre la importancia que tenían las palmas en los bosques tropicales hú­ medos y los distintos usos que les daban las poblaciones locales. En efecto, en la actualidad se sabe que estas plantas ofre­ cen cientos de us...
Article
Full-text available
Wildlife hunting is an important economic activity that contributes to the subsistence of indigenous peoples and the maintenance of their cultural identity. Changes in indigenous peoples’ ways of life affect the way they manage the ecosystems and resources around them, including wildlife populations. This paper explores the relationship between cul...
Article
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Pragmatic methods to assess the status of biodiversity at multiple scales are required to support conservation decision-making. At the intersection of several major biogeographic zones, Bolivia has extraordinary potential to develop a monitoring strategy aligned with the objectives of the Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network...
Article
Understanding how indigenous peoples’ management practices relate to biological diversity requires addressing contemporary changes in indigenous peoples’ way of life. This study explores the association between cultural change among a Bolivian Amazonian indigenous group, the Tsimane’, and tree diversity in forests surrounding their villages. We int...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Spain is one of the largest countries of Europe with an area of 505,992 km2 and a population of more than 46,500,000 people. It has a very rich vascular flora composed of 7071 species given its climatic, geographic and ecologic diversity. Inaddition to this high plant biodiversity, a complex history has brought about a great cultural diversity. A t...
Article
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We carried out a comprehensive literature review of the medicinal use of palms in northwestern South America and complemented it with a large number of field interviews. We investigated patterns of medicinal use across three ecoregions (Amazon, Andes, Chocó), four countries (Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia), and three human groups (indigenous, mes...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding patterns and mechanisms of variation in the compositional structure of communities across spatial scales is one of the fundamental challenges in ecology and biogeography. In this study, we evaluated the effects of spatial extent (i.e. size of study region) on: 1) whether community composition can be better explained by environmental (...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this work is to examine whether there exists a link between local and landscape patterns of species commonness, and if these are related to morphological traits in tropical plant communities. The Madidi region (Bolivian tropical Andes) is selected as study location. We estimated local and landscape commonness, rarity classes, height, dia...
Article
Full-text available
Despite long-standing interest in elevational-diversity gradients, little is known about the processes that cause changes in the compositional variation of communities (β-diversity) across elevations. Recent studies have suggested that β-diversity gradients are driven by variation in species pools, rather than by variation in the strength of local...
Article
Full-text available
A study of two Balkan ethnic groups living in close proximity finds that traditional knowledge about local plant resources helps communities to cope with periods of famine, and can promote the conservation of biodiversity.