Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo

Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo
University of Colorado Boulder | CUB · Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES)

PhD

About

258
Publications
130,433
Reads
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11,686
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2016 - present
University of Colorado Boulder
Position
  • Marie Skłodowska-Curie Postdoctoral Fellow
January 2014 - July 2016
Western Sydney University
Position
  • Research Associate
June 2013 - December 2013
King Juan Carlos University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (258)
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity is declining world-wide with detrimental effects on ecosystems. However, we lack a quantitative understanding of the shape of the relationship between microbial biodiversity and ecosystem function (BEF). This limits our understanding of how microbial diversity depletion can impact key functions for human well-being, including pollutant...
Article
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We lack both a theoretical framework and solid empirical data to understand domestication impacts on plant chemistry. We hypothesised that domestication increased leaf N and P to support high plant production rates, but biogeographic and climate patterns further influenced the magnitude and direction of changes in specific aspects of chemistry and...
Article
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Despite the importance of microbial communities for ecosystem services and human welfare, the relationship between microbial diversity and multiple ecosystem functions and services (that is, multifunctionality) at the global scale has yet to be evaluated. Here we use two independent, large-scale databases with contrasting geographic coverage (from...
Article
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Climatic conditions shift gradually over millennia, altering the rates at which carbon (C) is fixed from the atmosphere and stored in the soil. However, legacy impacts of past climates on current soil C stocks are poorly understood. We used data from more than 5000 terrestrial sites from three global and regional data sets to identify the relative...
Article
Determining the influence of climate in driving the global distribution of soil microbial communities is fundamental to help predict potential shifts in soil food webs and ecosystem functioning under global change scenarios. Herein, we used a global survey including 80 dryland ecosystems from six continents, and found that the relative abundance of...
Article
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Archaea represent a diverse group of microorganisms often associated with extreme environments. However, an integrated understanding of biogeographical patterns of the specialist Haloarchaea and the potential generalist ammonia‐oxidizing archaea (AOA) across large‐scale environmental gradients remains limited. We hypothesize that niche differentiat...
Article
The possibility of life elsewhere in the universe has fascinated humankind for ages. To the best of our knowledge, life, as we know it, is limited to planet Earth; yet current investigation suggests that life might be more common than previously thought. In this review, we explore extreme terrestrial analogue environments in the search for some not...
Article
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Soil fungi are fundamental to plant productivity, yet their influence on the temporal stability of global terrestrial ecosystems, and their capacity to buffer plant productivity against extreme drought events, remain uncertain. Here we combined three independent global field surveys of soil fungi with a satellite-derived temporal assessment of plan...
Article
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Fresh carbon (C) inputs to the soil can have important consequences for the decomposition rates of soil organic matter (priming effect), thereby impacting the delicate global C balance at the soil–atmosphere interface. Yet, the environmental factors that control soil priming effect intensity remain poorly understood at a global scale. Global. 1980–...
Article
The frequency and severity of drought are increasing due to anthropogenic climate change and are already limiting cropping system productivity in many regions around the world. Few microbial groups within plant microbiomes can potentially contribute towards the fitness and productivity of their hosts under abiotic stress events including water defi...
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The long‐term contribution of global forest restoration to support multiple dimensions of biodiversity and ecosystem function remains largely illusive across contrasting climates and forest types. This hampers the capacity to predict the future of forest rewilding under changing global climates. Here, 120 studies are synthesized across five contine...
Article
Significance The conservation of historical relics against microbial biodeterioration is critical to preserving cultural heritages. One major challenge is our limited understanding of microorganisms’ dispersal, colonization, and persistence on relics after excavation and opening to external environments. Here, we investigate the ecological and phys...
Article
Human‐induced disturbance has substantially influenced the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems globally. However, the extent to which multiple ecosystem functions (multifunctionality) recover following anthropogenic disturbance (ecosystem recovery) remains poorly understood. We report on the first study examining the temporal dynamics...
Article
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AimNitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are two major limiting factors in terrestrial ecosystems. Excessive N applications alter ecosystem functions by causing nutrient imbalances with P. Yet, little is known about why and how the balance between N and P regulates soil multifunctionality –the simultaneous provision of multiple soil functions–.Methods We...
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Theory and experiments support that plant invasions largely impact aboveground biodiversity and function. Yet, much less is known on the influence of plant invasions on the structure and function of the soil microbiome of coastal wetlands, one of the largest major reservoirs of biodiversity and carbon on Earth. We studied the continental‐scale inva...
Article
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Black yeasts are among the most stress-tolerant organisms of the planet, thriving under all types of terrestrial habitats and extreme environments. Yet, their global patterns and ecology remain far less studied, limiting our capacity to identify the main environmental drivers of these important organisms across biomes. To fill this knowledge gap, w...
Preprint
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Fungi play pivotal roles in ecosystem functioning, but little is known about their global patterns of diversity, endemicity, vulnerability to global change drivers and conservation priority areas. We applied the high-resolution PacBio sequencing technique to identify fungi based on a long DNA marker that revealed a high proportion of hitherto unkno...
Article
Rock-dwelling fungi play critical ecological roles in drylands, including soil formation and nutrient cycling; however, we know very little about the identity, function and environmental preferences of these important organisms, and the mere existence of a consistent rock mycobiome across diverse arid regions of the planet remains undetermined. To...
Preprint
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Fungi are major drivers of ecosystem functions. Increases in aridity are known to negatively impact fungal communities in dryland ecosystems globally, however, much less is known on the potential influence of other environmental drivers. To fill this knowledge gap, we reanalyzed 912 soil samples, providing the largest and most complete fungal commu...
Article
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Pedogenesis determines soil physicochemical properties and many biodiversity facets, including belowground microbial bacteria and fungi. At the local scale, top-down predation by microbial protists regulates the soil microbiome, while the microbiome also affects protistan communities. However, it remains unknown how pedogenesis affects protistan co...
Article
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Grazing by livestock can affect plant biodiversity and topsoil functions. However, experimental evidence on whether these impacts are limited to the topsoil or penetrate into deep layers (via changes in soil environment and resource locations) of soil is lacking, especially for soil microbial biomass and diversity. Here, we used paired grazed and u...
Article
Soils harbor the most diverse naturally evolved antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) on Earth, with implications for human health and ecosystem functioning. How ARGs evolve as soils develop over centuries, to millennia (i.e., pedogenesis), remains poorly understood, which introduces uncertainty in predictions of the dynamics of ARGs under changing en...
Article
Soils are important reservoirs for potential human pathogens and opportunistic fungi such as the dermatophyte or dimorphic fungi in the order Onygenales. In soils, these taxa are decomposers but many of them have the potential to cause respiratory and skin diseases in humans and, in some cases, systemic infections. Even so, the factors that determi...
Preprint
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The identification rate of measured peptide spectra to proteins barely scratches 1% in best-case scenarios. Hundreds of thousands of valuable spectra are lost as no viable match in the database is found. Here, we apply the delta m/z plot that was previously implemented in MSnbase as tool for quality control to 63 soil samples from three ecosystems...
Article
Photoautotrophic soil cyanobacteria play essential ecological roles and are known to experience large changes in their diversity and abundance throughout early succession. However, much less is known about how and why soil cyanobacterial communities change as soil develops from centuries to millennia, and the effects of vegetation on them. We combi...
Article
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The environmental factors controlling soil biodiversity along resource gradients remain poorly understood in wet tropical ecosystems. Aboveground biodiversity is expected to be driven by changes in nutrient availability in these ecosystems, however, much less is known about the importance of nutrient availability in driving soil biodiversity. Here,...
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Unraveling the biogeographic pattern of soil fungal decomposers along temperature gradients – in a smooth linearity or an abrupt jump – can help us connect the global carbon cycle to global warming. Through a standardized global field survey, we identify the existence of temperature thresholds that control the global distribution of soil fungal dec...
Article
Identifying the drivers of the response of soil microbial respiration to warming is integral to accurately forecasting the carbon-climate feedbacks in terrestrial ecosystems. Microorganisms are the fundamental drivers of soil microbial respiration and its response to warming; however, the specific microbial communities and properties involved in th...
Article
The polar regions, comprising the Antarctic, Arctic and Tibetan Plateau, represent the most extreme environments on Earth. Soils across the polar regions harbor diverse microorganisms, which dominate the biogeochemical cycling. However, polar soil microbial diversity is largely underrepresented, and has not been directly compared with the non-polar...
Article
Land use is a key factor driving changes in soil carbon (C) cycle and contents worldwide. The priming effect (PE)—CO2 emissions from changed soil organic matter decomposition in response to fresh C inputs—is one of the most unpredictable phenomena associated with C cycling and related nutrient mobilization. Yet, we know very little about the influe...
Article
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Soil carbon losses to the atmosphere, via soil heterotrophic respiration, are expected to increase in response to global warming, resulting in a positive carbon-climate feedback. Despite the well-known suite of abiotic and biotic factors controlling soil respiration, much less is known about how the magnitude of soil respiration responses to temper...
Article
Phosphorus (P) mineralization from organic matter is one of the most important microbially-driven soil processes in natural ecosystems. However, little is known about how long-term fertilization affect the abundance, diversity and community composition of these important organisms in croplands wherein P is directly supply via fertilizers. Here, we...
Article
co-engineering techniques are generally effective at reducing soil erosion and restore vegetal cover after wildfire. However, less evidence exists on the effects of the post-fire eco-engineering techniques to restore plant diversity. To fill this knowledge gap, a standardized regional-scale analysis of the influence of post-fire eco-engineering tec...
Article
Soil priming is a microbial-driven process which determines key soil-climate feedbacks in response to fresh carbon inputs. Despite its importance, the microbial traits behind this process are largely undetermined. Knowledge of the role of these traits is integral to advance our understanding of how soil microbes regulate carbon (C) emissions in for...
Article
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Cushion plants are specialized keystone species of alpine environments that can have a positive effect on ecosystem structure and function. However, we know relatively little about how cushion plants regulate the diversity and composition of soil microbial communities, major drivers of soil processes and ecosystem functioning. Identifying what fact...
Article
Salt marshes are highly productive intertidal wetlands located in temperate climatic zones, in which marine-to-terrestrial transition significantly influences microbial life. Numerous studies revealed the important coupling relationship between microbial diversity and ecosystem functions in terrestrial ecosystem, however, the importance of microbia...
Article
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Fungi support a wide range of ecosystem processes such as decomposition of organic matter and plant-soil relationships. Yet, our understanding of the factors driving the metaproteome of fungal communities is still scarce. Here, we conducted a field survey including data on fungal biomass (by phospholipid fatty acids, PLFA), community composition (b...
Article
Soil microbial diversity is extremely vulnerable to fertilization, which is one of the main anthropogenic activities associated with global changes. Yet we know little about how and why soil microbial diversity responds to fertilization across contrasting local ecological contexts. This knowledge is fundamental for predicting changes in soil microb...
Article
[Paper can be accessed at https://besjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1365-2745.13788] 1. Millions of trees are expected to be planted in forested and non-forested ecosystems during the United Nations Decade of Restoration. Trees and soil organisms are known to interact, and are both crucial for maintaining multiple ecosystem functi...
Article
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Background Increasing our knowledge of soil biodiversity is fundamental to forecast changes in ecosystem functions under global change scenarios. All multicellular organisms are now known to be holobionts, containing large assemblages of microbial species. Soil fauna is now known to have thousands of species living within them. However, we know ver...
Preprint
Full-text available
Soil cyanobacteria play essential ecological roles and are known to experience large changes in their diversity and abundance throughout early succession. However, much less is known about how and why soil cyanobacterial communities change as soil develops from centuries to millennia, and the effects of aboveground vegetation on these communities....
Article
Soil carbon contents and biodiversity play critical roles for the maintenance and regulation of ecosystem services in drylands. Increases in aridity are predicted to have a large impact on the soil carbon contents and microbial communities. These impacts can have serious implications at global scales which are still largely unknown. To increase car...
Article
Full-text available
Atmospheric nitrogen (N) inputs in the Mediterranean Basin are projected to increase due to fossil fuel combustion, fertilizer use, and the exacerbation of agricultural production processes. Although increasing N deposition is recognized as a major threat to ecosystem functioning, little is known about how local environmental conditions modulate ec...
Article
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The structure and function of the soil microbiome of urban greenspaces remain largely undetermined. We conducted a global field survey in urban greenspaces and neighboring natural ecosystems across 56 cities from six continents, and found that urban soils are important hotspots for soil bacterial, protist and functional gene diversity , but support...
Article
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Aims Land use change due to the increasing anthropogenic activities is the most important driver leading to alteration of multiple ecosystem functions. Overgrazing is thought to be one of most pervasive and significant degrading processes in grasslands, but direct comparisons with other comparable drivers of land use intensification are lacking. Ou...
Article
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Fungi regulate nutrient cycling, decomposition, symbiosis, and pathogenicity in cropland soils. However, the relative importance of generalist and specialist taxa in structuring soil fungal community remains largely unresolved. We hypothesized that generalist fungi, which are adaptable to various environmental conditions, could potentially dominate...
Article
Global change frequently disrupts the connections among species, as well as among species and their environment, before the most obvious impacts can be detected. Therefore, we need to develop a unified conceptual framework that allows us to predict early ecological impacts under changing environments. The concept of coupling, defined as the multipl...
Article
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The colossal project of mapping the microbiome on Earth is rapidly advancing, with a focus on individual microbial groups. However, a global assessment of the associations between predatory protists and their bacterial prey is still missing at a cross-ecosystem level. This knowledge is critical to better understand the importance of top-down links...
Article
Soil microbes, and the proteins they produce, are responsible for a myriad of soil processes which are integral to life on Earth, supporting soil fertility, nutrient fluxes, trace gas emissions, and plant production. However, how and why the composition of soil microbial proteins (the metaproteome) changes across wide gradients of vegetation, clima...
Article
Free‐air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) experiments in terrestrial ecosystems have demonstrated ecological responses of key ecosystem processes to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). However, CO2‐fertilisation responses in field conditions have seldom included methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), particularly in natural and mature forests,...
Article
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1. Land degradation drivers, including loss in vegetation and eutrophication, are expected to impact soil biodiversity and functions in drylands worldwide. Soils contain both common and rare microbial taxa that drive multiple soil functions. Yet, little is known about how these microbial taxa influence the impacts of land degradation drivers on eco...
Article
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Despite their extent and socio‐ecological importance, a comprehensive biogeographical synthesis of drylands is lacking. Here we synthesize the biogeography of key organisms (vascular and non‐vascular vegetation and soil microorganisms), attributes (functional traits, spatial patterns, plant‐plant and plant‐soil interactions) and processes (producti...
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AimsUrban ecosystems comprise a range of habitats that support key ecosystem processes that are fundamental for the functioning of their soils. Relatively little is known about how different types of urban greenspaces and settlement ages influence the functioning of these important environments.Methods We evaluated how four types of urban greenspac...
Article
Plant‐associated microbes play essential roles in nutrient uptake and plant productivity, but their role in driving plant germination, a critical stage in the plant life cycle, is still poorly understood. We used data from a large‐scale, field‐based soil seedbank study to examine the relationship among plants germinating from the seedbank and soil...
Article
Glacier-fed aquatic ecosystems provide habitats for diverse and active bacterial communities. However, the environmental vulnerabilities of co-existing water and sediment bacterial communities in these ecosystems remain unclear. Here, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to investigate co-existing bacterial communities in paired water and sediment sam...
Article
․Lichens play crucial roles in sustaining the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems; however, the diversity and ecological factors associated with lichenized soil fungi remain poorly understood. ․To address this knowledge gap, we used a global field survey including information on fungal sequences of topsoils from 235 terrestrial ecosystems. ․We id...
Article
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AimsWe evaluated the impacts of altered precipitation regimes on multiple aspects of the C cycle, including C fluxes, plant and soil microbial communities, and plant-soil interactions in a south-eastern Australian grassland.Methods Our experimental treatments, operated through an automated system, included: (i) reduced and (ii) increased rainfall a...
Article
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The relationship between biodiversity and biomass has been a long standing debate in ecology. Soil biodiversity and biomass are essential drivers of ecosystem functions. However, unlike plant communities, little is known about how the diversity and biomass of soil microbial communities are interlinked across globally distributed biomes, and how var...