Manuel Arbelo

Manuel Arbelo
Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria | ULPGC · Instituto Universitario de Sanidad Animal y Seguridad Alimentaria (IUSA)

Associate Professor. DVM. PhD. Dipl ECZM (Wildlife Population Health).

About

154
Publications
46,569
Reads
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2,491
Citations
Citations since 2016
80 Research Items
1513 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
Additional affiliations
January 2018 - present
Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
February 2014 - January 2018
Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
June 2012 - August 2012
Zoological Society of London
Position
  • Invited researcher
Education
October 1999 - September 2007
Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria
Field of study
  • Pathology and causes of death of stranded cetaceans in the Canary Islands
September 1992 - September 1999
Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria
Field of study
  • Veterinary School

Publications

Publications (154)
Article
Full-text available
Dolphins play a key role in marine food webs as predators of mid-trophic-level consumers. Because of their mobility and relatively long life span, they can be used as indicators of large-scale changes in the ecosystem. In this study, we calculated the trophic position (TP) of 5 dolphin species from the Canary, Madeira and Azores Islands using bulk...
Article
Full-text available
Neuromelanin (NM) is a dark polymer pigment that is located mostly in the human substantia nigra, and in the locus ceruleus, referred to as “the blue spot”. NM increases linearly with age, and has been described mainly in the human brain; however, it also occurs in the neurons of monkeys, horses, giraffes, cattle, sheep, goats, dogs, rats, and even...
Article
Full-text available
Nearly two decades ago, pathologic examination results suggested that acoustic factors, such as mid-frequency active naval military sonar (MFAS) could be the cause of acute decompression-like sickness in stranded beaked whales. Acute systemic gas embolism in these whales was reported together with enigmatic cystic liver lesions (CLL), characterized...
Article
Full-text available
Cetaceans are mammals that underwent a series of evolutionary adaptations to live in the aquatic environment, including morphological modifications of various anatomical structures of the skeleton and their bone mineral density (BMD); there are few studies on the latter. BMD is related to the radiodensity measured through computed tomography (CT) i...
Poster
Full-text available
Abstract: Estimating cetacean interactions with fishery activities is challenging (Kuiken, 1996; Moore et al., 2013). Bycatch is responsible for thousands of cetacean deaths per year globally (Young & Iudicello, 2007; Dolman & Moore, 2017). This study updates the data on fishery interaction in stranded cetaceans in the Canary Islands, from the last...
Article
Full-text available
Herpesviruses are causative agents of meningitis and encephalitis in cetaceans, which are among the main leading known natural causes of death in these species. Brain samples from 103 stranded cetaceans were retrospectively screened for the presence of herpesvirus DNA in the brain. Molecular detection of Cetacean Morbillivirus was performed in HV p...
Article
Full-text available
Considerable information has been gained over the last few decades on several disease processes afflicting free-ranging cetaceans from a pathologist's point of view. Nonetheless, there is still a dearth of studies on the hearts of these species. For this reason, we aimed to improve our understanding of cardiac histological lesions occurring in free...
Article
Full-text available
A retrospective survey for detecting the cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) was carried out in beaked whales (BWs) stranded in the Canary Islands (1999–2017). CeMV is responsible for causing worldwide epizootic events with the highest mass die-offs in cetaceans, although the epidemic status of the Canarian Archipelago seems to be that of an endemic situ...
Article
Full-text available
Harmful algal blooms (HABs) have been increasingly recorded over the last decades and much work has linked these events to multiple oceanographic and climate disturbances. HABs can affect ecosystems either as events that affect dissolved oxygen, clog fish gills, or smother corals or through the production of biotoxins which affect living marine res...
Article
Full-text available
We report the pathologic features of nocardiosis in five free-ranging delphinids from the Canary Islands and Andalusia, namely four striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and one bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). All animals had a multiorgan (disseminated) pattern of infection involving suppurative to pyogranulomatous and thromboembolic le...
Article
Full-text available
Cetacean brain sampling may be an arduous task due to the difficulty of collecting and histologically preparing such rare and large specimens. Thus, one of the main challenges of working with cetaceans’ brains is to establish a valid methodology for an optimal manipulation and fixation of the brain tissue, which allows the samples to be viable for...
Article
The gastrointestinal contents of twelve individuals from six odontocete species that stranded between 2018 and 2019 in the Macaronesian Region (Eastern North Atlantic) were examined for the presence of marine debris. In addition, concentrations of eleven organic persistent contaminants (nonylphenols, bisphenols, phthalates and pesticides) were anal...
Article
Full-text available
The monitoring of herpesvirus infection provides useful information when assessing marine mammals' health. This paper shows the prevalence of herpesvirus infection (80.85%) in 47 cetaceans stranded on the coast of the Valencian Community, Spain. Of the 966 tissues evaluated, 121 tested positive when employing nested-PCR (12.53%). The largest propor...
Article
Full-text available
The global whale population has dramatically declined in the past centuries due to anthropogenic abuse, whereas, climate change, ship strikes, entanglements, pollution, and water debris are currently making an enormous impact on the recovery of all whales on the planet. The prostate is recognized as the only male accessory gland in odontocete cetac...
Article
Full-text available
Poxvirus-like lesions are widely used as a potential health indicator in cetaceans, although for this application, corroboration of Poxvirus skin disease is imperative. Aiming to address skin biopsies intrusiveness, a preliminary investigation of a non-invasive skin sampling procedure to molecularly detect CePV-1 in 12 tattoo-like-lesions from two...
Article
Full-text available
Herpesviruses (HVs) (Alpha- and Gammaherpesvirinae subfamilies) have been detected in several species of cetaceans with different pathological implications. However, available information on their presence in beaked whales (BWs) is still scarce. In this study, a total of 55 BWs (35 Ziphius cavirostris and 20 animals belonging to the Mesoplodon genu...
Article
Full-text available
Estimating cetacean interactions with fishery activities is challenging. Bycatch and chronic entanglements are responsible for thousands of cetacean deaths per year globally. This study represents the first systematic approach to the postmortem investigation of fishery interactions in stranded cetaceans in the Canary Islands. We retrospectively stu...
Article
Full-text available
Hypoxia could be a possible risk factor for neurodegenerative alterations in cetaceans’ brain. Among toothed whales, the beaked whales are particularly cryptic and routinely dive deeper than 1,000 m for about one hour in order to hunt squids and fishes. Samples of frontal cerebral and cerebellar cortex were collected from nine animals, representin...
Article
Full-text available
Infectious and inflammatory processes are among the most common causes of central nervous system involvement in stranded cetaceans. Meningitis and encephalitis are among the leading known natural causes of death in stranded cetaceans and may be caused by a wide range of pathogens. This study describes histopathological findings in post-mortembrain...
Article
ABSTRACT: Testicular neoplasms are extensively described and characterized in domestic animals but reports in wildlife species, including marine mammals, are scarce. This case report describes a testicular seminoma in an adult striped dolphin Stenella coeruleoalba stranded along the coasts of the Canary Islands. Post-mortem computerized tomography...
Article
Full-text available
Fat embolism is the mechanical blockage of blood vessels by circulating fat particles. It is frequently related to traumas involving soft tissues and fat-containing bones. Different techniques have been used for decades to demonstrate histologically fat emboli, being the extremely toxic post-fixation with osmium tetroxide one of the most used techn...
Article
Full-text available
Simple Summary: Hearing is arguably the primary sensory and communication channel for cetaceans. The study of diverse physiological and pathological events involving this system, requires standardized and reliable protocols for processing valuable and scarce samples such as the ears of cetaceans. As part of our research, standardized tissue process...
Article
Full-text available
Some modifications in the vascular system of marine mammals provide adaptive advantages for diving. This study analyses the organisation of the aortic wall in dolphins, observing artery changes in volume and blood pressure for diving behaviour. Samples of three aortic segments (ascending, thoracic and abdominal) of three dolphin species were proces...
Article
Full-text available
Aggressive encounters involving cetacean species are widely described in the literature. However, detailed pathological studies regarding lesions produced by these encounters are scarce. From January 2000 to December 2017, 540 cetaceans stranded and were necropsied in the Canary Islands, Spain. Of them, 24 cases of eight species presented social tr...
Article
Full-text available
Capture myopathy (CM), is a syndrome that occurs as the result of the stress during and after capture, handling, restraint, and transport of wild animals. Although CM has been described for many species of cetaceans, characterization of the acute cardiac injury - an important component of this syndrome - are still scarce. In this study, we firstly...
Article
Full-text available
Capture myopathy (CM) is described in wild animals as a metabolic syndrome resulting from the extreme stress suffered during and after capture, handling, restraint, and transport. Although CM has been characterized in many species of cetaceans, descriptions of cardiac injury—an important component of this syndrome, and, according to previous author...
Article
Full-text available
The main objective of wildlife forensic investigation is to recognize pathologic changes and cause of death. Even though it may not always be possible to determine the specific illness and/or etiology, the description and subsequent interpretation of the injuries provide an invaluable understanding of pathology in cetacean post-mortem investigation...
Article
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Background: Brucella spp. isolation is increasingly reported in cetaceans, although associated pathologies, including lesions of the musculoskeletal and nervous systems, are less frequently described. Concerning the nervous system, Brucella sp. infection causing meningitis, meningoencephalitis or meningoencephalomyelitis have been extensively repo...
Article
The prostate is the only male accessory gland in cetaceans. However, little is known about this organ in these species. Anatomical and histological characteristics of the prostate have been described in only a few cetacean species, further, one study reported a high incidence of prostatic pathologies in cetaceans that may impair reproduction. The o...
Article
Background: Free-living cetaceans are exposed to a wide variety of stressful situations, including live stranding and interaction with human beings (capture myopathy), vessel strikes, and fishing activities (bycatch), which affect their wellbeing and potentially lead to stress cardiomyopathy (SCMP). Methods: Here, the authors aimed to characterise...
Article
Full-text available
Strikes between vessels and cetaceans have significantly increased worldwide in the last decades. The Canary Islands archipelago is a geographical area with an important overlap of high cetacean diversity and maritime traffic, including high-speed ferries. Sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus), currently listed as a vulnerable species, are severely...
Article
Full-text available
Immunology of marine mammals is a relatively understudied field and its monitoring plays an important role in the individual and group management of these animals, along with an increasing value as an environmental health indicator. This study was aimed at implementing the knowledge on the immune response in cetaceans stranded along the Italian coa...
Data
Western blot analysis was performed by loading 4 μg of human tonsil (Hu), 2.5 ug of striped dolphin (SC) and bottlenose dolphin (TT) cell membrane extract from lymph node onto an 12% SDS polyacrylamide gel. (A) CD5 monoclonal rabbit antibody (Biocare medical, USA product CRM 328) at a dilution of 1:500. (B) CD20 polyclonal rabbit antibody (Thermo S...
Data
Main microscopic findings in prescapular, pulmonary, mediastinal and mesenteric lymph nodes of striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from Canary Islands (Spain) and Italy, and Guiana dolphins (Sotalia guianensis) from Brazil. (DOCX)
Data
Main microscopic findings in the respiratory system of striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from the Canary Islands (Spain) and Italy, and Guiana dolphins (Sotalia guianensis) from Brazil. (DOCX)
Data
Template for recording histopathological findings in the central nervous system, including prosencephalon, mesencephalon and rhombencephalon. (DOCX)
Data
Template for recording histopathological findings in the respiratory system. (DOCX)
Data
Gross and microscopic pathologic findings, and most probable cause(s) of stranding and/or death (COD) in Guiana dolphins (Sotalia guianensis), striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) included in this study. (DOCX)
Data
Main microscopic findings in central nervous system of striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from Canary Islands (Spain) and Italy, and Guiana dolphins (Sotalia guianensis) from Brazil. (DOCX)
Data
Main microscopic findings in spleen of striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from Canary Islands (Spain) and Italy, and Guiana dolphins (Sotalia guianensis) from Brazil. (DOCX)
Data
Bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) brain; Mediosagittal aspect. A) Areas for neuroanatomical sampling (indicated as black rectangles) in striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and bottlenose dolphins from the Canary Islands (Spain). AcL, anterior cerebellar lobe; H, hypothalamus; Hy, hypophysis; Met, metencephalon; My, myelencephalon; OrL, o...
Data
Template for recording histopathological findings in the lymphoid system (lymph nodes, spleen). (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) is a major natural cause of morbidity and mortality in cetaceans worldwide and results in epidemic and endemic fatalities. The pathogenesis of CeMV has not been fully elucidated, and questions remain regarding tissue tropism and the mechanisms of immunosuppression. We compared the histopathologic and viral immunohistoc...
Article
Full-text available
Mass stranding events (MSEs) of beaked whales (BWs) were extremely rare prior to the 1960s but increased markedly after the development of naval mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS). The temporal and spatial associations between atypical BW MSEs and naval exercises were first observed in the Canary Islands, Spain, in the mid-1980s. Further research on...
Article
Full-text available
This study describes the pathologic findings and most probable causes of death (CD) of 224 cetaceans stranded along the coastline of the Canary Islands (Spain) over a 7-year period, 2006–2012. Most probable CD, grouped as pathologic categories (PCs), was identified in 208/224 (92.8%) examined animals. Within natural PCs, those associated with good...
Data
Tissues submitted for microbiological analysis and results from a subset of 224 stranded and necropsied cetaceans. (DOCX)
Data
Main morphologic and etiologic diagnoses in animals included in ‘natural pathology associated with significant loss of nutritional status’. (DOCX)
Data
Main morphologic and etiologic diagnoses in animals included in ‘vessel collision’. (DOCX)
Data
Main morphologic and etiologic diagnoses in animals included in ‘pathology associated with good nutritional status’. (DOCX)
Data
Main morphologic and etiologic diagnoses in animals included in ‘neonatal and perinatal pathology’. (DOCX)
Data
Main morphologic and etiologic diagnoses in animals included in ‘intra- and interspecific traumatic interactions’. (DOCX)
Data
Biological and epidemiological data of 224 stranded and necropsied cetaceans. Sex: female (F), male (M). Age: fetus (F), neonate (N), calf (C), juvenile (Jv), subadult (Sad), adult (Ad). Stranding date (SD; mm/dd/yy). Type of stranding (TS). Stranding location, island (IS): Gran Canaria (GC), Fuerteventura (FT), Lanzarote (LZ), Tenerife (TF), La Go...
Data
Details of immunohistochemical analyses performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections from selected cetacean species, including primary antibody (Ab), manufacturer, clonality, dilution, pretreatment, incubation, secondary Ab, manufacturer, and visualization system. CD: Cluster of differentiation; CK: cytokeratin; GFAP: glial fibril...