Manson Cheuk-Man Fong

Manson Cheuk-Man Fong
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University | PolyU · Department of Chinese and Bilingual Studies

PhD in Electronic Engineering (CUHK)

About

23
Publications
2,793
Reads
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264
Citations
Introduction
Brain ageing is a main driving force behind the individual differences in language and cognition. My research aims to understand this link by means of s/fMRI and EEG. Currently, I am working on several topics: (1) semantic cognition; (2) brain age estimation; and (3) subcortical language functions.
Education
August 2011 - November 2015
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Field of study
  • Electronic Engineering
September 2006 - November 2008

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Clustering and switching are hypothesised to reflect the automatic and controlled components in category fluency, respectively, but how they are associated with cognitive functions has not been fully elucidated, due to several uncertainties. (1) The conventional scoring method that segregates responses by semantic categories could not optimally dis...
Article
Full-text available
The inhibition deficit hypothesis (IDH) proposed that individual differences in inhibitory control is an underlying reason for age-related language decline. This study examined whether the hypothesis holds within the domain of lexico-semantic retrieval. Sixty-six older adults aged 60–79 were tested in a semantic fluency task comprising 16 categorie...
Article
Full-text available
The loss of complexity in ageing hypothesis (LOCH) has found support from EEG studies, most of which adopted signal-domain complexity measures. The present study adopted the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) to measure complexity from a nonlinear dynamical systems perspective. A total of 144 participants were included and divided into young, young-ol...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, foreign language learning (FLL) has been proposed as a possible cognitive intervention for older adults. However, the brain network and cognitive functions underlying FLL has remained largely unconfirmed in older adults. In particular, older and younger adults have markedly different cognitive profile—while older adults tend to exh...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies on the comprehension of code-switched sentences often neglected the code-switching habit of the specific community, so that the processing difficulty might not have resulted from the change in language but from unnatural switching. This study explores the processing cost of habitual and nonhabitual code-switching. Thirty-one young...
Presentation
Full-text available
Many older adults are self-discouraged from learning a new language because of the age-related cognitive decline, especially in memory. However, verbal knowledge (Christensen, 2001; Park, 2002) and inductive reasoning (Schaie, 2005) were found to be relatively intact. In the current study, an experimental language teaching program for older adults...
Poster
Full-text available
While it is now generally agreed that age does not prevent one to learn a foreign language, the decrease in working memory in old age is well-documented and would undoubtedly affect the efficiency of learning. In our study, fifteen cognitively normal older adults (mean age = 69.28, education = 5.87 years, MoCA = 24.6) participated in a 12-class ele...
Poster
Full-text available
In ERP studies on conflict processing, performance monitoring and error processing have been studied with two response-locked components, error-related negativity (ERN) and error positivity (Pe). However, their correct-related counterparts—the correct-related negativity (CRN) and correct positivity (Pc)—have not received similar attention. In parti...
Poster
Full-text available
One of the unique features of Hong Kong Cantonese that set it apart from other varieties of Cantonese is the dense Cantonese-English code-mixing (Leung & Li, 2020). Previous studies on the comprehension of code-mixing suggested that it was cognitively demanding (Macnamara & Kushnir, 1971), as the readers/listeners would not know when to prepare for...
Poster
Full-text available
Bilingual speakers frequently juggle two languages that are co-active during language processing. Switching back and forth between two languages, therefore incurs great cognitive cost. Whether language switching is particularly less or more effortful in certain bilinguals remains unclear (Van Hell et al., 2015). The present study zooms into triling...
Article
Receptive and expressive speech problems in dementia (e.g., difficulty in understanding complex concepts, incoherent speech) have been well‐documented. Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT) is a neurologic music therapy technique that was first developed to assist speech recovery in patients with post‐stroke aphasia. While this combination of music and...
Article
Full-text available
Aims and Objectives Bilinguals reportedly perform better in tasks that require the suppression of interference because of the constant practice in linguistic inhibition. However, previous literature was largely based on comparisons of pure monolinguals and balanced bilinguals. Those in between the two extremes were rarely examined. This project aim...
Article
Full-text available
The N2 component is a well-known neural correlate of conflict monitoring (CM), being more negative in the presence of conflicting information in visual conflict tasks. However, whether to-be-ignored auditory distractors can introduce additional conflict remains unknown. In the present work, subjects performed a visual (V) and audiovisual (AV) versi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
How vowels are organized cortically has previously been studied using auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), one focus of which is to determine whether perceptual distance could be inferred using AEP components. The present study extends this line of research by adopting a machine-learning framework to classify evoked responses to four synthetic mid-vo...
Article
Full-text available
Sinograms (i.e., Chinese characters) are usually composed of radicals which do not correspond to phonemes; instead, some radicals can occur as freestanding sinograms and have their own pronunciations. Previous research has demonstrated that the pronunciations of both radicals and sinograms are activated in reading low-frequency sinograms. However,...
Article
Full-text available
The P300 speller is a standard paradigm for brain--computer interfacing (BCI) based on electroencephalography (EEG). It exploits the fact that the user's selective attention to a target stimulus among a random sequence of stimuli enhances the magnitude of the P300 evoked potential. The present study questions the necessity of using random sequences...
Article
A visual speller is a brain–computer interface that empowers users with limited motor functionality to input text into a computer by measuring their electroencephalographic responses to visual stimuli. Most prior research on visual spellers has focused on input of alphabetic text. Adapting a speller for other types of segmental or syllabic script i...
Article
The widespread use of modern-day electronic devices with Chinese text input functionalities has allowed Chinese to be typewritten and exchanged at an unprecedented rate. To serve these growing needs, continuous efforts have been made to improve the performance of Chinese input methods, which come in three main types: root-based, stroke-based and so...
Article
We argue that the S=1/2 kagome antiferromagnet undergoes a quantum phase transition when the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya coupling is increased. For D < D-c the system is in a moment-free phase, and for D>D-c the system develops antiferromagnetic long-range order. The quantum critical point is found to be D-c similar or equal to 0.1J using exact diagonali...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Hello everyone,
In my experimental linguistics research, I would like to evaluate how an interaction effect is influenced by additional predictors.
To be precise, suppose there are 10 questions in my experiment. The dependent variable is the number of correct responses a subject produced (N) during either the first or second half of the response period of each question. In modelling the data, I treat Half (first/second) as a factor, and there are also three demographic variables (age, education, gender) and 3 cognitive predictors (denoted as CP1, CP2, & CP3).
Here are the two models involved, in the notation of the lme4 package:
Null: N ~ Age + Education + Gender + Half + Half:Age + (1|Subject) + (1|Question)
Alternative: N ~ Age + Education + Gender + Half + Half:Age + CP1 + CP2 + CP3 + (1|Subject) + (1|Question)
Hypothesis: The Half:Age interaction (i.e., the age-related differences in the number of correct responses across the two halves) can be accounted for by the three cognitive variables.
So, I anticipate that, upon adding the 3 cognitive predictors, the Half:Age interaction would be significantly reduced, if not vanished altogether.
I'm using glmer (rather than lmer) to fit the model, due to the "counts" nature of the dependent variable. The lme4 package would output the beta (i.e., the regression coefficient), the std. error, and the p-value for each model.
Question: In my analysis, the beta associated with Half:Age is reduced from 0.012 to 0.006 after CP1-CP3 were included as predictors. I've considered using Welch's t-test (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welch%27s_t-test) to examine whether the beta has significantly reduced. Plugging in the beta & the SEs into the formula, I found that the reduction in the beta was very close to being significant. However, Welch's t-test is for independent samples with unequal variances. Is there a more suitable test for this purpose?
Thanks a lot in advance!

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This project aims to clarify the functional connections of medial temporal lobe structures that strongly contribute to L2 learning success during adulthood.
Project
This project aims to investigate the age-related neural reorganization that underlies the changes in semantic ability across the adult lifespan, by clarifying the behavioral and neural consequences of the changing functional connectivities (RSFCs) in the left frontotemporal network.