Manami Sato

Manami Sato
Okinawa International University · Department of British and American Language and Culture

Ph.D

About

11
Publications
1,289
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69
Citations
Citations since 2016
6 Research Items
55 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022024681012
2016201720182019202020212022024681012
2016201720182019202020212022024681012
2016201720182019202020212022024681012
Introduction

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
When comprehending (Japanese) null-subject sentences, people mentally simulate the linguistically depicted events without adopting a particular point-of-view (i.e., perspective) (Sato & Bergen, 2013). The present study examined whether a sense of agency (SoA), measured by the Sense of Agency Scale (Asai et al., 2009), predicts individual preference...
Article
Full-text available
The literature of Ryukyuan languages has made various claims, including: “this language is not intelligible to that (neighboring) language/dialect,” “fluent speakers are 60 years old or above,” or “younger generations are Japanese monolingual or understand the local language but do not speak it” (Pellard & Shimoji 2010, Takubo 2013, among others)....
Article
Full-text available
The embodied cognition hypothesis postulates that human cognition is fundamentally grounded in our experience of interacting with the physical world (Barsalou in Behav Brain Sci 22:577–609, 1999). Research has shown bi-directional associations between physical action and the processes of understanding language: language comprehension seems to activ...
Article
Full-text available
Syntactic properties such as word orders are a major factor determining the difficulty of a sentence. In SO-type languages where the subject (S) precedes the object (O) in canonical word order, there is clear evidence that the SO word order is preferred over the OS word order. We investigate to what extent this SO bias is maintained even in typolog...
Article
Full-text available
In many languages with subject-before-object as a syntactically basic word order, transitive sentences in which the subject precedes the object have been reported to have a processing advantage over those in which the subject follows the object in sentence comprehension. Three sources can be considered to account for this advantage, namely, syntact...
Article
We report on two experiments that ask when and under what linguistic conditions comprehenders construct detailed shape representations of mentioned objects, and whether these can change over the course of a sentence when new information contradicts earlier expectations. We used Japanese because the verb-final word order of Japanese presented a reve...
Article
Language comprehenders can mentally simulate perceptual and motor features of scenes they hear or read about (Barsalou, 1999; Glenberg & Kaschak, 2002; Zwaan, Stanfield, & Yaxley, 2002). Recent research shows that these simulations adopt a particular perspective (Borghi, Glenberg, & Kaschak, 2004; Brunyé, Ditman, Mahoney, Augustyn, & Taylor, 2009)....

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