Malik OEDIN

Malik OEDIN
Province Nord de la Nouvelle-Calédonie · Service Impact Environnemental et Conservation

PhD Population Biology and Ecology
Interested by bats, working on the assessment of hunting and predation by Felis catus on their populations.

About

12
Publications
3,344
Reads
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42
Citations
Introduction
New Caledonian researcher working on the management of two flying fox species exploited in New Caledonia, Pteropus ornatus and tonganus. In particular, he is assessing the population dynamics and the impact of hunting and feral cats. Also studying the spatial ecology of these species. Interested in all bats in general and all island wildlife
Additional affiliations
October 2016 - November 2016
Institut de Recherche pour le Developement et Institut Agronomique néo-Calédonien
Position
  • Volunteer Engineer
May 2016 - July 2016
Institut Agronomique néo-Calédonien
Position
  • Research Assistant
November 2015 - April 2016
Institut Agronomique néo-Calédonien
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Analysis of the flying foxes population monitoring data in the Northern Province of New Caledonia. - Work on analysis of population trend on short time steps
Education
September 2014 - September 2015
Université de Poitiers
Field of study
  • Master 2 Profesionnel Génie Ecologique
September 2013 - June 2014
Université de Poitiers
Field of study
  • Master 1 Ecologie et Biologie des Populations option Ecologie appliquée
February 2010 - September 2012
University of New Caledonia
Field of study
  • Licence Sciences de la Vie, de la Terre et de l'Environnement

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Leptospirosis is a bacterial zoonosis that occurs in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. Chiroptera are known to be a formidable reservoir of zoonotic pathogens, including leptospires. The epidemiology of leptospirosis in bats in the Pacific Islands is poorly known, both in terms of prevalence and in terms of the bacterial strains involved....
Article
Hunting is a major threat to many species of wildlife. However, managing hunting systems to ensure their sustainability requires a thorough demographic knowledge about the impact of hunting. Here we develop a framework integrating ecological, modelling and sociological data to achieve a sustainability assessment of flying-fox hunting in New Caledon...
Poster
Full-text available
The impact of invasive predators on bats is still widely unknown, and generally not considered in bat conservation strategies. A recent literature review has shown that cats, Felis catus, in all their forms (domestic, stray or feral) prey upon many bat species far more frequently than is generally supposed including largest species (Pteropodids). H...
Article
Full-text available
Pacific Island bats are utterly fascinating, yet under threat and overlooked. Meet 4 species https://theconversation.com/pacific-island-bats-are-utterly-fascinating-yet-under-threat-and-overlooked-meet-4-species-165765 Paci c Island bats are utterly fascinating, yet under threat and overlooked. Meet 4 species
Thesis
Full-text available
Habitat degradation, invasive species and overexploitation are currently the three main threats to biodiversity. Here we present a study on the population status of two sympatric flying fox species, Pteropus ornatus (endemic) and P. tonganus (native), and the impact of hunting and predation by the feral cat Felis catus in New Caledonia. The study o...
Article
en • Cats Felis catus, in all their forms (domestic, free‐roaming/stray and feral), have been identified as a major global threat to biodiversity, especially birds and small mammals. However, there has been little previous consideration of the extent and impact of predation of bats by cats, or of whether specific characteristics make certain speci...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive feral cats threaten biodiversity at a global scale. Mitigating feral cat impacts and reducing their populations has therefore become a global conservation priority, especially on islands housing high endemic biodiversity. The New Caledonian archipelago is a biodiversity hotspot showing outstanding terrestrial species richness and endemism....
Article
Background Hemotropic mycoplasmas, previously classified in the genus Eperythrozoon, have been reported as causing human infections in Brazil, China, Japan and Spain. Methods In 2017, we detected DNA from “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemohominis” in the blood of a Melanesian patient from New Caledonia presenting with febrile splenomegaly,weight loss, l...
Article
Full-text available
Assessing population trends and their underlying factors is critical to propose efficient conservation actions. This assessment can be particularly challenging when dealing with highly mobile, shy and nocturnal animals such as flying-foxes. Here we investigated the dynamics of hunted populations of Pteropus ornatus and P. tonganus in the Northern P...
Poster
Full-text available
Understanding the spatial and temporal dynamic of a population and its underlying factors is critical to propose efficient conservation actions. This is all the more true since conservationists are dealing with highly mobile and vulnerable animals such as flying-foxes. In New Caledonia (South Pacific), ongoing studies are conducted on spatial ecolo...
Poster
Full-text available
Flying foxes in the Pacific are species with high ecological and/or cultural issues Nevertheless, flying foxes are often the largest native frugivorous and nectarivorous in islands and also possess the highest capacity of movement which suggests a high potential for seed dispersal and pollination Bats are the only terrestrial native mammals of the...
Poster
Full-text available
La viabilité des espèces gibiers endémiques dans les milieux insulaires représente un challenge pour les biologistes de la conservation, en particulier lorsqu'il est nécessaire de préserver les populations d'espèces exploitées à un niveau permettant de perpétuer les prélèvements associés à la culture et aux coutumes locales. C'est le cas de nombreu...

Questions

Questions (4)
Question
Can cats (Felis catus) hear bats? Especially species using echolocation (ultrasounds) ?
Question
I've a map with segment of roads and the speed limit for each segment.
On the other hand I've sample points, sometimes on road sometines no.
I want to estimate the least cost time to go on this points.
Question
I have seen that determination of age by teeth analysis is possible ...
Question
I'm working on Flying-foxes monitoring and I want to know how I can built my protocol of fly-out count.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Fruit bats of the genus Pteropus are commonly harvested across their distribution despite most species are threatened. The goal of this procject, conducted in New Caledonia in partnership with Institut Agronomique de Nouvelle-Calédonie (IAC) and Institut de Recherche et Développement (IRD), is to implement an adaptive management to ensure the sustainability of Pteropus populations (2 main species including one endemic to NC) and the associated traditionnal hunting.
Project
In the South Pacific, the New-Caledonian biodiversity hotspot (Myers et al., 2000) hosts four species of flying foxes, including three endemics (Kirsch et al., 2002). Flying foxes are emblematic species, particularly in the Kanak culture. They are very appreciated as bush meat and are often consumed during major events in the tribes (e.g., yam celebration). Flying foxes can also be constitutive parts of the identity of some clans (e.g., animal totem), or can be used in making their traditional money (Guyard et al., 2014 ; Fossier et al., 2016). Several sources of information seem to indicate a population decline at the scale of New Caledonia, in particular historical camp disappearance and testimonies of the declining trend in the number of flying-foxes according to different players/users of nature (Brescia, 2007 ; Boissenin & Brescia, 2009 ; Boissenin et al., 2017). Given that the traditional Kanak system of hunting of flying foxes has been in place since the arrival of the Melanesians 3000 years ago, without leading to species extinction (current fossil records do not point out bat extinction), the present-day decline of flying foxes suggests that the system’s sustainability has weakened. In the past, flying foxes were hunted for a long time exclusively by the Kanak community as an opportunistic food item, and/or for specific events (customary ceremonies). Today, however, these species are consumed by numerous communities within the country. Increasing use of firearms, insertion of the flying fox hunt into the habits of a broader New Caledonian population, illegal hunting and illegal trade are potential factors leading to the currently observed decline in flying fox populations (Boissenin & Brescia, 2009). Hunting of flying foxes in New Caledonia is regulated and its marketing is prohibited. However these regulations are not always respected and poaching takes place. More surprisingly, study of feral cat diets at the scale of the archipelago highlights a significant consumption of flying foxes by this introduced predator in all forested areas (Palmas et al., 2015). In the current context, the long-term viability of the New Caledonian flying fox populations, subject to increasing harvest, reduction and fragmentation of habitat and predation, and thus the sustainability of the hunting system, is questioned. The knowledge gap concerning flying foxes population dynamics and demography in response to anthropic impacts needs to be closed, so as to promote efficient conservation programs. In order to develop an adaptive management strategy for the conservation of these species in New Caledonia, an approach based on ecological sciences, including demographics, has been chosen, which will be linked with information from the social sciences. Our objectives are to: 1) assess the demographics and population dynamics of flying foxes in New Caledonia; 2) quantify the relative impacts of hunting and introduced predators on flying fox population dynamics and on the viability of these populations over time; and 3) offer management and conservation strategies, through the integration of biological aspects (population dynamics, relative impacts of cats) and human aspects (harvests, practices and traditions). Toward these aims, this work will be based on knowledge already acquired by local research institutes, but will also lead to the acquisition of original data on the biology and the demography of these species. The ultimate goal will be to better understand these species and their usages, in order to establish more sustainable management options in New Caledonia.