Maja Mielke

Maja Mielke
University of Antwerp | UA · Department of Biology

Master of Science

About

8
Publications
2,877
Reads
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87
Citations
Citations since 2017
8 Research Items
87 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230510152025
20172018201920202021202220230510152025
Introduction
Maja Mielke does research in functional morphology, currently studying the biomechanics of the beak in songbirds.
Additional affiliations
February 2020 - July 2022
University of Antwerp
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Biomechanics of the beak in songbirds
July 2017 - April 2018
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Position
  • Master's Student
Description
  • Bone Microstructure in Finite Element Modeling: The Functional Role of Trabeculae in the Femoral Head of Sciurus vulgaris
October 2016 - May 2018
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Position
  • Master's Student
Description
  • Trabecular architecture in the sciuromorph femoral head: allometry and functional adaptation
Education
October 2014 - April 2018
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Field of study
  • Organismic Biology and Evolution
October 2011 - December 2014
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Field of study
  • Biophysics

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Full-text available
Background Sciuromorpha (squirrels and close relatives) are diverse in terms of body size and locomotor behavior. Individual species are specialized to perform climbing, gliding or digging behavior, the latter being the result of multiple independent evolutionary acquisitions. Each lifestyle involves characteristic loading patterns acting on the bo...
Article
Full-text available
In arboreal habitats, animals encounter substrates of varying inclinations. Consequently, the external loads acting on the limb bones during arboreal locomotion are diverse in terms of magnitude and orientation. It is not well understood how limb bones are adapted to a broad range of loading directions and which functional role is adopted by the tr...
Article
Full-text available
Digitization of video recordings often requires the laborious procedure of manually clicking points of interest on individual video frames. Here, we present progressive tracking, a procedure that facilitates manual digitization of markerless videos. In contrast to existing software, it allows the user to follow points of interest with a cursor in t...
Article
Full-text available
Many songbird species rely on seeds as a primary food source and the process of picking up, positioning, cracking, dehusking, and swallowing seeds is one of the most sophisticated tasks of the beak. Still, we lack understanding about how granivorous songbirds move their beak during the different phases of seed processing. In this study, we used mul...
Article
The skull of a woodpecker is hypothesized to serve as a shock absorber that minimizes the harmful deceleration of its brain upon impact into trees1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and has inspired the engineering of shock-absorbing materials12, 13, 14, 15 and tools, such as helmets.¹⁶ However, this hypothesis remains paradoxical since any absorptio...
Article
Full-text available
The RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) has broad antiviral activity inducing translational shutdown of viral and cellular genes and is therefore targeted by various viral proteins to facilitate pathogen propagation. The pleiotropic NS1 protein of influenza A virus acts as silencer of PKR activation and ensures high-level viral replication and virul...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The goal is to investigate how the cranial system of songbirds generates complex 3D movements during feeding. Three species with different beak size and bite force will be compared in order to explore how beak morphology affects feeding biomechanics. This will help us under understand the biomechanical basis of the force-velocity trade-off in beak movement. Intermediate steps will be: 1) Analysis of the kinematics of the beak/cranium during feeding via high speed (X-ray) videography 2) Mechanical testing of cranial muscles and ligaments 3) Generating a multi-body dynamics model of the musculoskeletal system of the songbird cranium