Maja Horst

Maja Horst
Technical University of Denmark | DTU · Department of Management Engineering

About

38
Publications
5,117
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
912
Citations
Citations since 2016
14 Research Items
640 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
Full-text available
Gene-editing technology, such as CRISPR/Cas9, holds great promise for the advancement of science and many useful applications technology. This foundational technology enables modification of the genetic structure of any living organisms with unprecedented precision. Yet, in order to enhance its potential for societal benefit, it is necessary to ada...
Article
Scientists face increasing demands to integrate practices of ‘responsibility’ into their working lives. In this paper, we explore these developments by discussing findings from a research project that investigated how publically funded scientists perceived and practiced responsibility. We show that, though the scientists in this study mostly viewed...
Research
Full-text available
STAGE was an eight country thematic network whose aims were to develop and refine a heuristic model of science and technology governance in Europe. Its approach has been one of iteration between, on the one hand, conceptual overview and synthesis, taking account of work under FP4, wherever possible parallel work under FP5 and the wider literature,...
Chapter
Science communication can take many forms. It may involve universities trying to promote their brand, harried parents taking their families to a science event, efforts to enable laypeople to participate in science policymaking, researchers giving public lectures at learned institutions, or social media storms around scientists’ public missteps. Sci...
Chapter
In 2015, former biochemist Richard Grant wrote a blog post in the Guardian’s online science section. Titled ‘Scientists or beancounters: who decides what’s best for UK science?’1 it discussed changes underway in UK higher education funding. The UK government, Grant wrote, had called in management consultants McKinsey to advise on how best to cut th...
Chapter
The previous chapter focused on scientists as actors in public communication. We argued that we should not view scientists solely as individuals but instead see them as acting as representatives of different collectives. But scientists are not the only, and maybe not even the primary, actors within contemporary science communication. This is, as we...
Chapter
Much research on science communication has focused on scientists as the disseminators of scientific knowledge. There’s an implicit sense that it is individual scientists who are the important actors in science communication—those who define its practice, and whose experiences and opinions we need to better understand. Just as Rae Goodell’s seminal...
Chapter
Cultures are not stable. The way in which science is communicated, and science and society are expected to relate, is not static but continually developing. This book is about giving a snapshot of the richness of contemporary science communication, but, more than that, it is about equipping us, as scholars and students of science communication, to...
Chapter
Science communication is important in modern knowledge societies. Many societies around the world now expect scientific knowledge and technological development to be at the core of economic growth and welfare and hope that science will find solutions to challenges such as climate change and scarcity of energy, food, and water. Such expectations imp...
Chapter
In July 2013, the UK government released a press release about its earmarking of an extra £60 million for research in synthetic biology. This, the release said, would help ensure that the UK ‘remains at the forefront of synthetic biology’, and quoted a speech by the Minister for Universities and Science. Synthetic biology was an important technolog...
Chapter
Science communication, we have argued, is not only about how scientific knowledge travels between individuals and groups (science and society, scientists and laypeople, experts and audiences). It is also about organisations, identities, spaces, emotions, careers, futures, and many other aspects of the cultures we live in. Science communication is t...
Article
This book describes current practices in science communication, from citizen science to Twitter storms, and celebrates this diversity through case studies and examples. However, the authors also reflect on how scholars and practitioners can gain better insight into science communication through new analytical methods and perspectives. From science...
Chapter
This is a story from a few years back—from 2005, to be exact—but one that might still ring true for some forms of science communication. It dates from the height of UK interest in public engagement with science. Science cafes, panel debates, and dialogue events were popping up all over. This particular event was held in a bar in central London; par...
Book
Full-text available
Stengler, E. (2015) Studying Science Communication. Bristol: Science Communication Unit. ISBN 9781860435225 We recommend you cite the published version. The publisher's URL is:
Article
This article reports findings from an interview study with group leaders and principal investigators in Denmark, the United Kingdom and the United States. Taking as our starting point current interest in the need to enhance ‘responsible research and innovation’, we suggest that these debates can be developed through attention to the talk and practi...
Article
This chapter explores the notion of responsible innovation (RI) as it is currently being imagined in policy and governance practice. It does this in the context of three different countries: The UK, US and Denmark. We ask how RI is being constituted within policy discussion. What is it understood as being? What kinds of actors are implicated in it?...
Article
Society's expectations for an increased role in science agenda setting and greater returns on public science investments shift university management practices. Entrepreneurial university, new public management, and sociology of science literatures inform the changing expectations about the roles and norms that govern university management and scien...
Chapter
‘Responsible development’ has risen to become a key normative framework for nanotechnology. The technology’s governance landscape is fundamentally structured through a discourse of responsibility, in which political tools such as public engagement, voluntary reporting and soft law are mobilised so as to enable innovation. To call for responsibility...
Article
Full-text available
This article employs the Foucauldian notion of ‘political rationality’ to map discussions and ideals about the responsibility of science toward society. By constructing and analyzing an archive of 263 journal papers, four political rationalities were identified: the Demarcation rationality, which aims to exclude the social from the scientific produ...
Conference Paper
While there is a large academic and policy literature on the need to increase the social responsibility of science, less is known about the translation of these calls into practice. Drawing from empirical studies of how scientists and research managers interpret and translate calls for responsibility into practice, this paper demonstrates large gap...
Article
Departing from experiences at a recent conference on Science in Dialogue, the paper reflects on the significance of the closure of the Danish Board of Technology as a government funded institution. It is argued that the lack of active support from the Danish public might be an unanticipated consequence of the Board's successful institutionalisation...
Article
Social and political interest in science regularly prompts scientists to assume the role of public spokesperson. The article investigates this role of representing science as both speaking on behalf of science and symbolically standing for science and its organizations. With inspiration from the field of organizational communication, it is argued t...
Article
Developments within 3D digital modelling are often heralded as a much needed solution to problems of information loss and communication difficulties within the building industry. Despite the abundance of technical possibilities for innovation, however, there is currently no standardized, widely used digital model that solves these problems. Rather,...
Chapter
This chapter provides an introduction to the Danish landscape of science communication, which is built on a deeply rooted culture of equality and anti-elitism. Within this cultural tradition, citizens have a moral right to question the testimony of authorities and to counter it with their own experiences of ordinary life. The tradition is described...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores how virtual worlds are rhetorically constructed as obvious, innovative spaces for communication about architecture. It is argued that the marketization of an innovative use of new media platforms happens in early phases of the innovation processes, and the success of new media technologies such as virtual worlds hinges on the...
Article
Characterised by a shift from a diffusion to a deliberation model of science communication, the past decades have witnessed a proliferation of science communication formats. In order to better understand the complexity and novelty of these formats, we propose a ‘model of emergence’ that conceptualises science communication as an event in which the...
Article
In 2007 a social scientist and a designer created a spatial installation to communicate social science research about the regulation of emerging science and technology. The rationale behind the experiment was to improve scientific knowledge production by making the researcher sensitive to new forms of reactions and objections. Based on an account o...
Article
Full-text available
Developments in biotechnology have sparked off a number of social controversies during the past decades and it has been common to understand public debate as a necessary prerequisite for the ability to deal with these controversies. This is particularly true in the case of Denmark, where public debate has been taking place for more than 25 years; t...
Article
Full-text available
In response to the recent troubled history of risk-related technological development in Europe, one institutional reaction has been to advocate public deliberation as a means of achieving broad societal consensus over socio-scientific futures. We focus on 'consensusing' and the expectation of consensus, and consider both their roots and their perfo...
Article
Drawing on case studies from the STAGE research network, this article explores a possible new 'European mode' of scientific governance associated with participation and deliberation. The article presents a typology of governance styles: discretionary, corporatist, educational, market, agonistic and deliberative. Despite a widespread interest in del...
Article
Full-text available
Maja Horsts artikel argumenterer for, at forskningskommunikation kan have en positiv indflydelse på selve forskningsprocessen, således at den viden, der produceres bliver bedre eller mere socialt robust, fordi den udsættes for indvendinger, modsigelser eller andre reaktioner. For at udnytte dette potentiale må man forstå forskningskommunikation som...
Article
After an extensive period of public controversy, the Danish parliament legalised stem cell research on ‘spare’ embryos in 2003. This paper argues that this legalisation was dependent on a perception of acceptability among the public and explores how public debate can serve a ‘performatory function’ in establishing such a situation of perceived legi...
Chapter
Controversies about science and technology are often understood as problems of poor communication between science and society. Based on the academic tradition of studies in the public understanding of science, the chapter identifies three different models for the communicative relationship between science and its publics (the model of diffusion, th...
Article
Full-text available
The article combines a criticism of public understanding of science (PUS) with the sociology of expectations to examine how particular expectations toward scientific progress have performative effects for the construction of publics as citizens of science. By analyzing a particular controversy about gene therapy in Denmark, the article demonstrates...
Article
Full-text available
The 1998 announcement by American researcher Richard Seed that he intended to clone a human person for reproductive reasons created a large amount of journalistic attention and controversy in the Danish mass media. Developing a theoretical framework inspired by Bruno Latour, this paper analyzes the mass mediated articulation of this announcement as...

Network

Cited By