Mahee Gilbert-Ouimet

Mahee Gilbert-Ouimet
Université du Québec à Rimouski UQAR | uqar · Département des Sciences Infirmières

PhD

About

54
Publications
11,149
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631
Citations
Introduction
I am associate professor at the Université du Québec à Rimouski (UQAR). I am the chairholder of the Canada research chair in sex and gender in occupational health. I specialize in examining the adverse effects of psychosocial stressors at work on mental and cardiometamolic health. I am also a sex and gender expert.
Additional affiliations
September 2007 - present
Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec
Position
  • Project Manager

Publications

Publications (54)
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Psychosocial stressors at work have been identified as significant risk factors for several mental and physical health problems. These stressors must be compensated by psychosocial resources to prevent or reduce adverse effects on health. Questionnaires measuring these stressors and resources already exist, but none integrate digital str...
Article
Full-text available
Moral injuries can occur when perpetrating, failing to prevent, or bearing witness to acts that transgress deeply held moral beliefs and expectations. The COVID-19 crisis highlighted the fact that psychosocial stressors at work, such as high emotional demands, are placing Canadian healthcare workers at risk of moral injuries. Evidence linking psych...
Article
Objective: Recent research identified that workplace factors play a role in the development of diabetes mellitus (DM). This study examines the longitudinal association of work-related overqualification with the incidence of DM over a 14-year follow-up period. Methods: We used data from the 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey linked to the Onta...
Article
Full-text available
Population-based strategies targeting modifiable risk factors are needed to improve the prevention of hypertension. Long working hours have been linked to high blood pressure (BP), but more longitudinal research is required. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of long working hours (≥41 h/week) on ambulatory BP mean over a 2.5-yea...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Cost studies appear sporadically in the scientific literature and are rarely revised unless drastic technological advancements occur. However, health technologies and medical guidelines evolve over time. It is unclear if these changes render obsolete prior estimates. We examined this issue in a cost study in the context of patients' fi...
Article
Objectives Previous studies on the effect of low social support at work on blood pressure showed mixed results. Few previous studies have used ambulatory blood pressure and examined whether the effect of low social support at work vary among men and women. The aim of this study was to examine the association between low social support at work, ambu...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to synthesize the available data on prospective associations between work-related stressors and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) among adult workers, according to the demand-control-support (DCS) and the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) models. Method: We searched for prospective...
Article
Background Chronic low-grade inflammation has been associated with high risk of several chronic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, depression, and dementia. As low-grade inflammation could be present long before the apparition of the disease, identifying modifiable risk factors could allow to act upstream. Psychosocial stressors at...
Article
Objectives Psychosocial stressors at work have been proposed as modifiable risk factors for mild cognitive impairment (MCI). This study aimed to evaluate the effect of cumulative exposure to psychosocial stressors at work on cognitive function. Methods This study was conducted among 9188 white-collar workers recruited in 1991–1993 (T1), with follo...
Article
Objectives: To assess the effectiveness of a workplace intervention reducing psychosocial stressors at work in lowering blood pressure and hypertension prevalence. Methods: The study design was a quasi-experimental pre-post study with an intervention group and a control group. Post-intervention measurements were collected 6 and 36 months after t...
Article
Background Evidence from prospective studies has suggested that long working hours are associated with incident coronary heart disease (CHD) events. However, no previous study has examined whether long working hours are associated with an increased risk of recurrent CHD events among patients returning to work after a first myocardial infarction (MI...
Article
Objective: The American Diabetes Association recently called for research on social and environmental determinants of diabetes to intensify primary prevention. Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that frequent and modifiable psychosocial stressors at work might contribute to the development of diabetes, but more prospective studies are needed...
Article
Objectives This study assesses the validity of a self-reported mental health problem (MHP) diagnosis as the reason for a work absence of 5 days or more compared with a physician-certified MHP diagnosis related to the same work absence. The potential modifying effect of absence duration on validity is also examined. Methods A total of 709 participa...
Article
By 2050, an estimated 152 million people will be living with dementia. Prospective studies suggest that exposure to psychosocial stressors at work could be associated with a higher risk of mild cognitive impairment or dementia, but the evidence is still not clear. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of cumulative exposure to psychosocial stress...
Article
Introduction: This study examines the separate and combined relationships between occupational physical activity (characterized by nonaerobic activities such as heavy lifting and prolonged standing) and leisure time physical activity on future diabetes incidence. Methods: Data from Ontario respondents aged 35–74 years from the 2003 Canadian Communi...
Article
This overview of systematic reviews (SR) aims to determine how the potential confounding and/or mediating effects of lifestyle habits were taken into consideration in SR examining the job strain effect on cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence. Thirteen SR were identified. Lifestyle habits were often considered as confounders (n = 8). Authors repor...
Article
Objectives To examine the relationship between job strain and incident myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure in a representative population of men and women in Ontario, Canada, over a 15-year period.MethodsA total of 14,508 respondents having provided responses to either the 2000/2001, 2002, or 2003 cycles of the Canadian Community Hea...
Article
Objectives Women have a higher incidence of mental health problems compared with men. Psychosocial stressors at work are associated with mental health problems. However, few prospective studies have examined the association between these stressors and objectively measured outcomes of mental health. Moreover, evidence regarding potential differences...
Article
Importance Mental health problems are associated with considerable occupational, medical, social, and economic burdens. Psychosocial stressors at work have been associated with a higher risk of mental disorders, but the risk of sickness absence due to a diagnosed mental disorder, indicating a more severe condition, has never been investigated in a...
Article
Objective To determine the number of latent body mass index (BMI) trajectories from 1994 to 2010 among working Canadians and their association with concurrent trajectories in work environment exposures. Methods Data of employed individuals from the longitudinal Canadian National Population Health Survey were used. Group-based trajectory modelling...
Article
Previous studies on the effect of long working hours on blood pressure have shown inconsistent results. Mixed findings could be attributable to limitations related to blood pressure measurement and the lack of consideration of masked hypertension. The objective was to determine whether individuals who work long hours have a higher prevalence of mas...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Depression is a common and disabling health problem that contributes to an important social and economic burden, particularly among the working age population. The deleterious effect of psychosocial work factors on depression has been documented. However, the most recent systematic reviews had restrictive eligibility criteria and, sinc...
Article
Background: Psychological distress is a strong and independent predictor of major depression. Assuming multiple roles (such as being both a mother and an employee) under stressful conditions may lead to psychological distress. This study evaluated, for the first time, the longitudinal effect of the simultaneous exposure to psychosocial work stress...
Article
To determine whether white-collar workers treated for hypertension who are exposed to psychosocial stressors at work have a higher prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension than unexposed workers, this study conducted three waves of data collection over a 5-year period (repeated cross-sectional design). The study sample was composed of 464 white-coll...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose of Review Psychosocial stressors at work from the demand-latitude and effort-reward imbalance models are adverse exposures affecting about 20–25% of workers in industrialized countries. This review aims to summarize evidence on the effect of these stressors on blood pressure (BP). Recent Findings Three systematic reviews have recently docu...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Mental health problems (MHPs) are frequent and disabling and are the first or second leading cause of certified sickness absences from work in industrialised countries. They are generally long lasting and generate a considerable human and socioeconomic burden. The deleterious effect of adverse psychosocial work factors on MHP has been...
Article
Background This study aimed to determine the number of latent smoking trajectories among Canadians employed in the workforce over a 16-year period, and if latent trajectories in dimensions of the physical and psychosocial work environment were associated with specific smoking trajectories. Methods We studied 5461 employed adults from the longitudi...
Article
Aims: Masked hypertension may affect up to 30% of the general population and is associated with a high cardiovascular disease risk. No previous study has examined the incidence of masked hypertension and its risk factors. The study aim was to determine the incidence of masked hypertension and to examine its related risk factors. Methods: This is...
Conference Paper
Objective: Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of mortality worldwide accounting for 17.7 million deaths per year. Mental health problems (MHP) are the fi rst cause of disability worldwide. Their prevalence, long duration and high risk of recurrence place a considerable burden on health and social care systems and important producti...
Article
Full-text available
Objective According to the International Diabetes Federation, the most important challenge for prevention is now to identify social and environmental modifiable risk factors of diabetes. In this regard, long work hours have recently been linked with diabetes, but more high-quality prospective studies are needed. We evaluated the relationship betwee...
Conference Paper
Introduction Work-life balance (WLB) refers to the harmonisation of one’s professional and personal roles. A growing body of research suggests that this conflict may be associated with various mental and physical health problems. An increasing number of organisations are implementing measures to promote WLB, but the effects of these on workers’ hea...
Article
Objectives: Stress is an important factor affecting the health of working population. While work exposures are determinants of levels of work and life stress, we do not know whether similar or different exposures are related to stress levels for men and women. This study aimed to formally examine male/female differences in the relationships betwee...
Article
Background It is unclear how psychosocial working conditions influence future alcohol consumption. Using group-based trajectory modelling, this study aimed to determine: the number of latent alcohol consumption trajectories over 16 years in a representative sample of the Canadian workforce; the association between psychosocial working conditions an...
Article
Full-text available
While a growing body of research is examining the impacts of prolonged occupational sitting on cardiovascular and other health risk factors, relatively little work examined the effects of occupational standing. The objectives of this paper were to examine the relationship between occupations that require predominantly sitting, and those that requir...
Article
Hypertension is an important risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of death worldwide. Adverse effects of psychosocial factors at work might increase the risk of masked hypertension, but evidences are still scarce. The objective of this study is then to determine whether adverse psychosocial work factors from the effort-reward i...
Article
We examined the association between effort-reward imbalance (ERI) exposure at work and unsuccessfully treated hypertension among white-collar workers from a large cohort in Quebec City, Canada. The study used a repeated cross sectional design involving three waves of data collection (2000-09). The study sample was composed of 474 workers treated fo...
Article
Full-text available
Background Mental health problems (MHP) are the leading cause of disability worldwide. The inverse association between socioeconomic position (SEP) and MHP has been well documented. There is prospective evidence that factors from the work environment, including adverse psychosocial work factors, could contribute to the development of MHP including...
Article
Objective: Accumulating evidence shows that psychosocial work factors of the demand-control and effort-reward imbalance models may contribute to increase blood pressure (BP). Women are more likely to be exposed to these psychosocial factors than men. Moreover, women spend twice as much time per week performing family responsibilities than men. Thi...
Article
Objectives Psychological distress is a strong predictor of major depression. Accumulating evidences show that psychosocial work factors (i.e. work stressors) of the demand-control and effort-reward imbalance models may contribute to the development of mental health problems. Women are more likely to be exposed to these psychosocial work factors tha...
Chapter
Workplace interventions aiming to improve work environment characteristics, including psychosocial work factors, have been widely recommended to improve workers’ health. This chapter presents: (i) evidences regarding the effects of interventions aiming to reduce adverse psychosocial work factors and related health problems, (ii) quality criteria re...
Article
To describe the changes implemented as part of a workplace psychosocial intervention. The intervention was conducted in a public organization employing 1630 white-collar workers. The intervention was defined as all changes implemented to reduce adverse psychosocial work factors. A logbook was held to describe the changes implemented in the interven...
Article
Full-text available
This study aimed to investigate the association between employees' perceptions of their exposure to an organizational-level occupational health intervention and its psychosocial outcomes. Participants were employees of an insurance firm (N = 1084) in Quebec, Canada. The intervention was designed to reduce adverse psychosocial work factors (high psy...
Article
Full-text available
A growing body of research has investigated the adverse effects of psychosocial work factors on blood pressure (BP) elevation. There is now a clear need for an up-to-date, critical synthesis of reliable findings on this topic. This systematic review aimed to evaluate the adverse effects of psychosocial work factors of both the demand-control-suppor...
Article
To determine whether men and women with repeated ERI exposure have increased BP means or higher hypertension incidence over a 3-year follow-up. To examine the potential modifying effect of age and overcommitment. The study cohort was composed of 1,595 white-collar workers (629 men and 966 women) assessed at baseline and 3-year follow-up. Ambulatory...
Article
To compare employees' and managers' perceptions of implemented changes in an organizational-level workplace intervention. Nine departments participated in an intervention aimed at reducing adverse psychosocial work environment factors. On the basis of a prior risk evaluation, department managers were responsible for decisions and implementation of...
Article
Full-text available
Organizations are facing ever-stiffer competition in the current globalized economy, and employees are consequently being exposed to increasingly adverse psychosocial work factors. Psychosocial work factors, also called psychosocial stressors, refer to all organizational factors and interpersonal relationships in the workplace that may affect worke...