Maggie R Jones

Maggie R Jones
U.S. Census Bureau · Center for Administrative Records Research and Applications

PhD

About

17
Publications
3,476
Reads
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520
Citations
Citations since 2016
9 Research Items
516 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
Additional affiliations
July 2012 - present
U.S. Census Bureau
Position
  • Economist
Description
  • My research involves using survey data linked with tax data from the IRS to answer interesting economic questions about taxes, transfers, wages, and income.
Education
September 2007 - May 2012
Cornell University
Field of study
  • Policy Analysis and Management

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
We examine the impact of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act on the income rank of American Indian (AI) reservation residents. We assemble a panel dataset at the individual level for tax filers residing on AI reservations in 1989. We examine the effect of casino operations and cash distribution payments (from casino revenues) on the income-rank evolut...
Article
Using confidential-use, individual-level Internal Revenue Service and US Census data, we follow the earnings of Hispanics and Asians between the ages of 18-45 with panel data that spans the years 2005-2014. These two groups represent the largest immigration flows in recent years. We examine the impact that labor market entrants and new immigrant ar...
Article
Full-text available
We study the sources of racial disparities in income using anonymized longitudinal data covering nearly the entire U.S. population from 1989 to 2015. We document three results. First, black Americans and American Indians have much lower rates of upward mobility and higher rates of downward mobility than whites, leading to persistent disparities acr...
Article
Using unique linked data, we examine income inequality and mobility across racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Our data encompass the universe of income tax filers in the United States for the period 2000–2014, matched with individual-level race and ethnicity information from multiple censuses and American Community Survey data. We docum...
Article
Full-text available
The literature on the self-employed hypothesizes two different paths to self-employment. On the one hand, self-employment is associated with entrepreneurship and a motivation to pursue an opportunity. On the other hand, previous research indicates that people also become self-employed because of limited opportunities in the wage sector. Using a uni...
Poster
Full-text available
Using race and ethnicity data derived from multiple Censuses and ACS files, linked at the person level to Form 1040 tax data, we analyze income inequality by race and ethnic group in the U.S. from 2000 to 2014.
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, I examine the impact of the Great Recession on Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) eligibility. Because the EITC is structurally tied to earnings, the direction of this impact is not immediately obvious. Families who experience complete job loss for an entire tax year lose eligibility, while those experiencing underemployment (part-year...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines a method of tax avoidance not previously studied: the sort-ing of dependent children among related filers who have "doubled up" in a household for economic reasons. Using the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Eco-nomic Supplement (CPS ASEC) linked with 1040 data from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), we examine house...
Article
Research examining parental reports of children's living arrangements has often relied on information about legally ordered custody agreements following divorce. This analysis used data from matched pairs of parents (N = 1,156) in the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study who live apart to compare mother and father reports of their child's res...
Data
Full-text available
This paper examines the response of workers, in terms of hours worked, to the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). Several studies have consis-tently found that receipt of the EITC induces single women with dependent children to enter the labor market. These same studies, however, did not find the expected negative impact of EITC receipt on number of h...

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