Magdalena Zabek

Magdalena Zabek
Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, WA · Invasive Species

PhD

About

10
Publications
2,405
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41
Citations
Introduction
My research focus is on how environmental conditions influence population dynamics of wild and feral animals (particularly equids), and what this implies for conservation and/or management planning. As a photographer and documentary film-maker, my passion is to capture on camera the behavior and social interactions of studied animals.

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Understanding population dynamics of invasive species is crucial for the development of management strategies. Feral horses (Equus caballus) are a growing problem in the Tuan–Toolara State Forest (TTSF), a coniferous plantation in south-eastern Queensland, Australia. The population dynamics of the TTSF feral horses was not known. Therefore, the stu...
Article
Full-text available
Context. Feral horses are a growing problem in Australia, despite implementation of management strategies. The incidence of horse sightings and horse-associated vehicle collisions within the Tuan and Toolara State Forest (TTSF), a coniferous plantation in south-eastern Queensland, has increased in the past decade, indicating an increase in populati...
Thesis
Feral horses (Equus caballus) in Australia are a growing problem despite implementation of management strategies. The increasing number of feral horses within the Tuan and Toolara State Forest (TTSF), a coniferous plantation on the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, and particularly near major public roads, has been recognised as a problem in the last dec...
Article
The study of any wild animal’s home range requires the collection of spatio-temporal data, obtained independently of climatic conditions or time of day. This can be achieved by the attachment of global positioning system (GPS) data loggers, which, in large species, is best achieved by remote immobilisation. Feral horses (Equus caballus) usually occ...
Conference Paper
Despite numerous concerns raised by government agencies, private landholders, and the general public on feral horse (Equus caballus) presence in the Australian ecosystems, there is lack of collective solutions on the management of this overabundant species. It has been proposed that successful management of feral horses in the Australian landscape...
Conference Paper
Toolara State Forest is the largest exotic commercial pine plantation of a size of 880 km2, located in Queensland, Australia. Due to an abundant supply of resources, there has been a considerable increase in the population of feral horses (Equus caballus), which is facing an increased risk of overpopulation. In other areas of Australia, significant...
Article
Despite ongoing projects involving the breeding and release of equids into semi-wild and wild environments, insufficient information is available in the literature that describes strategies used by equids to adapt and survive in a novel environment. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of naïve, feral Equus caballus (horse) mares to cope...
Article
(Full article is in Polish. Magdalena Depa is my maiden name). An entire population of 213 horses starting in three-day events in Poland in 1999 was investigated, taking into account their breed. Three hundred forty five starts of the analysed horses in the Official International and Polish competitions and 223 starts in the Young Horse Championshi...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Black-footed rock wallaby (Petrogale lateralis MacDonnell Ranges race) have contracted dramatically in range and abundance over the past 80 years. As a result of this ongoing decline, they are considered one of South Australia's most endangered mammal species. The aim of my work is to reverse the decline and restore the population to their former range.