Magdalena Migalska

Magdalena Migalska
Jagiellonian University | UJ · Institute of Environmental Sciences

PhD

About

18
Publications
2,179
Reads
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299
Citations
Citations since 2016
15 Research Items
290 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
Introduction
My scientific interests concern evolutionary biology and immunogenetics, especially evolution of the host-parasite interactions and evolution of the vertebrate immune system. Now, the core focus of my research is to test optimality hypothesis in evolution of copy number of Major Histocompatibility Complex genes (MHC).
Additional affiliations
May 2022 - October 2022
The University of Edinburgh
Position
  • visiting researcher
January 2018 - July 2018
University of Cambridge
Position
  • Intern
January 2014 - December 2017
Adam Mickiewicz University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
January 2014 - June 2019
Adam Mickiewicz University
Field of study
  • Evolutionary Biology
October 2011 - October 2013
Jagiellonian University
Field of study
  • Biotechnology
October 2008 - June 2011
Jagiellonian University
Field of study
  • Biotechnology

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encode proteins that initiate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of foreign antigens to T cells. The high polymorphism found at these genes, thought to be promoted and maintained by pathogen-mediated selection, contrasts with the limited number of MHC loci found in most vertebrates. Altho...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, immune repertoire profiling with high-throughput sequencing (HTS) has advanced our understanding of adaptive immunity. However, fast progress in the field applied mostly to human and mouse research, with only few studies devoted to other model vertebrates. We present the first in-depth characterization of the T-cell receptor (TCR)...
Article
Characterisation of highly duplicated genes, such as genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), where multiple loci often co-amplify, has until recently been hindered by insufficient read depths per amplicon. Here we used ultra-deep Illumina sequencing to resolve genotypes at exon 3 of MHC class I genes in the sedge warbler (Acrocephalus...
Article
Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are revolutionizing the fields of biology and medicine as powerful tools for amplicon sequencing (AS). Using combinations of primers and barcodes, it is possible to sequence targeted genomic regions with deep coverage for hundreds, even thousands, of individuals in a single experiment. This is extremely...
Article
Pathogens are one of the main forces driving the evolution and maintenance of the highly polymorphic genes of the vertebrate major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Although MHC proteins are crucial in pathogen recognition, it is still poorly understood how pathogen‐mediated selection promotes and maintains MHC diversity, and especially so in host...
Article
Full-text available
Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encode proteins crucial for adaptive immunity of vertebrates. Negative frequency‐dependent selection (NFDS), resulting from adaptation of parasites to common MHC types, has been hypothesized to maintain high, functionally relevant polymorphism of MHC, but demonstration of this relationship has remained e...
Article
Full-text available
Proteins encoded by Antigen Processing Genes (APGs) provide MHC class I (MHC-I) with antigenic peptides. In mammals, polymorphic multigenic MHC-I family is served by monomorphic APGs, whereas in certain non-mammalian species both MHC-I and APGs are polymorphic and coevolve within stable haplotypes. Coevolution was suggested as an ancestral gnathost...
Chapter
AmpliSAS and AmpliHLA are web server tools for automatic genotyping of MHC genes from high-throughput sequencing data. AmpliSAS is designed specifically to analyze amplicon sequencing data from non-model species and it is able to perform de-novo genotyping without any previous knowledge of the reference alleles. AmpliHLA is a human-specific version...
Preprint
In recent years, immune repertoire profiling with high-throughput sequencing (HTS) has advanced our understanding of adaptive immunity. However, fast progress in the field applied mostly to human and mouse research, with only few studies devoted to other model vertebrates. We present the first in-depth characterization of the TCRβ repertoire in a n...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Recent work suggests that gene duplications may play an important role in the evolution of immunity genes. Passerine birds, and in particular Sylvioidea warblers, have highly duplicated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, which are key in immunity, compared to other vertebrates. However, reasons for this high MHC gene copy num...
Article
The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a central role in the adaptive immune response and is the most polymorphic gene family in vertebrates. Although high-throughput sequencing has increasingly been used for genotyping families of co-amplifying MHC genes, its potential to facilitate early steps in the characterisation of MHC variation in...
Article
The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a central role in the adaptive immune response and is the most polymorphic gene family in vertebrates. Although high-throughput sequencing has increasingly been used for genotyping families of co-amplifying MHC genes, its potential to facilitate early steps in the characterisation of MHC variation in...
Article
Full-text available
In evolutionary studies, blood parasites in avian populations are commonly used as a model of host–parasite interactions. The effect of mixed infections on avian hosts has recently drawn more interest, but the effects of infection with multiple blood parasites and specific parasite lineages are poorly known. A protocol for reliable detection and qu...
Article
Full-text available
SUMMARY We characterized partial sequences of 18S rDNA from sedge warblers infected with a parasite described previously as Hepatozoon kabeeni. Prevalence was 47% in sampled birds. We detected 3 parasite haplotypes in 62 sequenced samples from infected animals. In phylogenetic analyses, 2 of the putative Hepatozoon haplotypes closely resembled Lank...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The complexity of the vertebrate immune system evolved mainly in response to the pressure from pathogens. However, to fully understand structure and function of this system, we also need to consider evolutionary trade-offs constraining its development. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC), molecules necessary for the initiation of the adaptive immune response, are a perfect example of this duality. Co-evolutionary dynamics between hosts and pathogens generate and maintain huge allelic polymorphism of MHC. Yet, individuals possess only a few, functional MHC loci, thus can accommodate only a fraction of the adaptive diversity present at the population level. A T-cell receptor (TCR) depletion hypothesis posits this limitation could be an evolutionary trade-off between pathogen recognition and self-tolerance. However, results of my previous project challenged the generality of this long-standing hypothesis, by revealing an unexpected difference between the two MHC classes: MHC class I, that presents intracellular pathogens to cytotoxic, CD8+ T cells; and MHC class II , that presents extracellular pathogens to helper, CD4+ T cells. High diversity of MHC class I, but not of MHC class II, correlated with a smaller total TCR repertoire in bank voles. The proposed project aims to explain the observed disparity, by examining how an increased diversity of a particular MHC class influences both counts and TCR repertoire size of the responding T cell subset (i.e., CD8+, CD4+ and Treg CD4+Foxp3+). The project will also incorporate a concept of context-dependence of the costs of immunity into the TCR depletion hypothesis, by testing for interactions between MHC diversity and sex.
Project
Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), coding for proteins involved in parasite recognition in vertebrates, but also playing a role in mate choice and social interactions, are a paradigm for the maintenance of adaptive polymorphism. However, our understanding of the evolution of the number of expressed MHC molecules is only rudimentary. The first aim of the project is to test the crucial prediction of the optimality hypothesis (Nowak et al. 1992), which poses that increased parasite recognition capacity associated with expressing many MHC molecules is counterbalanced by the simultaneous decline in T-cell repertoire. This prediction will be tested in the bank vole Clethrionomys glareolus, a species showing extensive inter-individual variation in the number of classical MHC genes expressed. The second aim of the project is to explore, by means of computer simulations, alternative mechanisms potentially shaping the number of expressed MHC genes, including mate choice and constraints on the evolution of proteins expressed by pathogens.