Magdalena Matyjek

Magdalena Matyjek
University Pompeu Fabra | UPF · Center of Brain and Cognition (CBC)

MSCA EUTOPIA-SIF COFUND Postdoc Fellow

About

20
Publications
13,992
Reads
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25
Citations
Introduction
Social neuropsychologist and experimental psychologist with MSc in Cognitive Science | working on social cognition in neurotypicals and autism | EEG - ERPs, eye tracking - pupillometry
Additional affiliations
October 2021 - present
University Pompeu Fabra
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2016 - present
Jagiellonian University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • EEG study. Founded by National Science Centre grant awarded to dr. M. Senderecka: Influ- ence of emotions on perception, response inhibition, and error monitoring: ERP analysis (2016-2019)
December 2015 - September 2016
Jagiellonian University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Eye tracking study. Funded by National Science Centre grant awarded to prof. A. Chuderski: Chasing the homunculus of self-control: Mechanisms of goal selection and application (2011-2016).
Education
October 2016 - September 2019
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Field of study
  • Neuropsychology
October 2013 - July 2015
Jagiellonian University
Field of study
  • Cognitive Science
October 2010 - June 2013
Jagiellonian University
Field of study
  • Cognitive Science

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
This study aimed to discover predictors of subjective and objective difficulty in emotion perception from dynamic facial expressions. We used a multidimensional emotion perception framework, in which observers rated the perceived emotion along a number of dimensions instead of choosing from traditionally-used discrete categories of emotions. Data w...
Thesis
Full-text available
Belohnungen sind im Leben des Menschen von enormer Bedeutung. Es wurde vermutet, dass die zentralen sozialen Schwierigkeiten bei Autismus-Spektrum-Störungen (ASS) auf eine verminderte Reaktionsfähigkeit auf spezifische soziale Belohnungen zurückzuführen sein könnten. Die Literatur zu diesem Thema ist jedoch nicht schlüssig. Diese Dissertation umfas...
Preprint
Atypicalities in processing of social rewards have been suggested to lie at the root of social difficulties in autism spectrum conditions (ASC). While evidence for atypical reward function in ASC is mounting, it remains unclear whether it manifests specifically in hypo- or hyper-responsiveness, and whether it appears only in the social domain or mo...
Preprint
In recent years, academia has been facing a mental health crisis affecting especially early career researchers (ECRs). Moreover, the COVID-19 pandemic has posed an unprecedented burden for the mental health of many individuals. In this study we conducted an online survey aiming to investigate how ECRs, specifically doctoral students, evaluate their...
Article
Full-text available
Observing familiar (known, recognisable) and socially relevant (personally important) faces elicits activation in the brain’s reward circuit. Although smiling faces are often used as social rewards in research, it is firstly unclear whether familiarity and social relevance modulate the processing of faces differently, and secondly whether this proc...
Article
Full-text available
Prior affective and social knowledge about other individuals has been shown to modulate perception of their faces and gaze‐related attentional processes. However, it remains unclear whether emotionally charged knowledge acquired through interactive social learning also modulates face processing and attentional control. Thus, the aim of this study w...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the growing emphasis on embedding interactive social paradigms in the field of cognitive and affective neuroscience, the impact of socially induced emotions on cognition remains widely unknown. The aim of the present study was to fill this gap by testing whether facial stimuli whose emotional valence was acquired through social learning in...
Article
Full-text available
Social rewards are a broad and heterogeneous set of stimuli including for instance smiling faces, gestures, or praise. They have been widely investigated in cognitive and social neuroscience as well as psychology. Research often contrasts the neural processing of social rewards with non-social ones, with the aim to demonstrate the privileged and un...
Article
Full-text available
Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have been linked to aberrant reward processing, but it remains unclear whether it is a general dysfunction or limited to social stimuli, and whether it affects both phases of reward processing, namely anticipation and reception. We used event-related brain potentials and a population-based approach to investigate re...
Article
Full-text available
Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have been linked to aberrant reward processing, but it remains unclear whether it is a general dysfunction or limited to social stimuli, and whether it affects both phases of reward processing, namely anticipation and reception. We used event-related brain potentials and a population-based approach to investigate re...
Preprint
Social rewards are a broad and heterogeneous set of stimuli, which have been widely investigated in cognitive and social neuroscience/psychology. Research often contrasts the neural processing of social rewards with non-social ones, with the aim to demonstrate the privileged and unique nature of social rewards or to examine shared neural processing...
Article
Full-text available
The present study had three main objectives. First, we aimed to evaluate whether short-duration affective states induced by negative and positive words can lead to increased error-monitoring activity relative to a neutral task condition. Second, we intended to determine whether such an enhancement is limited to words of specific valence or is a gen...
Poster
Full-text available
Theory of Mind (ToM) is the ability to attribute mental states to others and oneself. It has been suggested that deficiencies in this ability may be the core reason for impaired social interactions in Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC). Recent investigations have proposed a two-fold mechanism of ascribing mental states to cognitive agents, recognisin...
Poster
Full-text available
Multistability refers to the brain’s ability to switch between several alternative interpretations (percepts) of perceived ambiguous objects (e.g., seeing a duck or a rabbit in the rabbit-duck illusion). Previous eye-tracking studies investigating this phenomenon are inconsistent. While studies on the perception of ambiguous 3D objects (mainly usin...
Poster
Full-text available
Cognitive science, the interdisciplinary study of the mind, has recently turned towards examining social interactions in natural environments. One often neglected aspect, however, is the relationship between emotions and the processing of eye cues. This motivated us to conduct a study investigating the influences of emotions on the perception of so...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
English: Human social environment requires an ability to display and detect intentions and different mental states in others. Nonverbal communication covers a number of elements, among which face and eyes are of a great importance. Surprisingly, the relations between them remain neglected, usually reduced to their co- occurrence and not their mutua...
Poster
Full-text available
The aim of the study was to investigate elements of human social behaviour, namely relations between emotional cues displayed by a performing agent and observers’ visual attention to her face or gestures, in a natural setting, in order to maximise environmental validity. Our intention in this study was to contribute to the emerging research framewo...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Are autistic traits linked to abnormal sensitivity to rewards? If so, is this limited to social domain (smiles, gestures, etc), or manifested more broadly (monetary rewards, food, informative feedback)? We use event-related brain potentials, pupillary responses and behavioural measurements to shed light on reward responsiveness in connection to autistic traits.