Magdalena Blanz

Magdalena Blanz
University of Vienna | UniWien · Vienna Institute for Archaeological Science

PhD MChem

About

10
Publications
1,466
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45
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Introduction
I am an archaeological chemist using stable isotope ratio and trace element analyses of archaeological and modern samples to answer questions about our past. Currently I am researching the spread of animal husbandry from the Mediterranean to southeast Europe in the Neolithic. For my PhD I studied past uses of seaweeds, focusing on seaweed as food, animal fodder and fertiliser in North Atlantic Islands. I am particularly interested in method development.

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Ratios of barium and strontium concentrations in skeletal samples (e.g. in the logarithmic form lg(Ba/Sr)), are a possible alternative or supplementary marker to stable carbon isotope ratios (δ¹³C) for identification of marine food consumption. Previous studies have compared lg(Ba/Sr) values between different species of animals with differing diets...
Article
Knowledge of the uptake and fate of mercury (Hg) compounds in biota is important in understanding the global cycling of Hg and its transfer pathways through food chains. In this study, we analysed total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in 117 livers of Scottish birds of prey that were found across Scotland and submitted for po...
Article
Full-text available
Traditional crofting in Scotland used Bere barley fertilised with seaweed. Bere has known abilities to cope with the marginal, high pH soils without inorganic fertiliser addition. The objective of this study was to assess whether Bere productivity is specifically enhanced when fertilised with seaweed. We grew Bere genotypes in field and glasshouse...
Article
Seaweed consumption by wild, feral and domesticated animals in coastal areas world-wide is currently likely widely underestimated. Seaweed consumption on the Orkney Islands by domesticated animals has become an established part of the archaeological literature, but the extent of seaweed consumption elsewhere is still largely unknown in archaeologic...
Article
Fertilisation with animal manure has been shown to affect crop chemical and isotopic composition, indicating that if manuring effects are not taken into account, there is a risk of overestimating consumer trophic levels in palaeodietary studies. The effect of fertilisation with seaweed, a common fertiliser in the past in coastal areas, has been the...
Article
This paper presents a combination of elemental and isotopic spatial distribution imaging with near-infrared hyperspectral imaging (NIR-HSI) to evaluate the diagenetic status of skeletal remains. The aim is to assess how areas with biogenic n(⁸⁷Sr)/n(⁸⁶Sr) isotope-amount ratios may be identified in bone material, an important recorder complementary...
Article
Evaluating the extent of an individual's exposure to arsenic, (potentially) indicative of proximity to smelting activities, poisoning, or dietary history, has proven difficult in archaeological contexts due to uncertainties surrounding how arsenic biogenically accumulates in the tissues commonly found at archaeological sites such as bone and tooth,...
Article
Red opaque glasses of two different sites in central Germany, a medieval glassworks in Glashütten, Taunus Mountains, and an early modern glassworks in Wieda, Harz Mountains, were analysed with regard to their optical appearance. By scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, metallic copper nanoparticles were identified as a conspicuous con...

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