Maëva Gabrielli

Maëva Gabrielli
University of Ferrara | UNIFE · Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnologies

Doctor of Philosophy

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6
Publications
2,361
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50
Citations

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Full-text available
Chromosomal organization is relatively stable among avian species, especially with regards to sex chromosomes. Members of the large Sylvioidea clade however have a pair of neo-sex chromosomes which is unique to this clade and originate from a parallel translocation of a region of the ancestral 4A chromosome on both W and Z chromosomes. Here, we too...
Article
Full-text available
Reconstructing past events of hybridization and population size changes are required to understand speciation mechanisms and current patterns of genetic diversity, and ultimately contribute to species' conservation. Sea turtles are ancient species currently facing anthropogenic threats including climate change, fisheries, and illegal hunting. Five...
Article
The presence of congeneric taxa on the same island suggests the possibility of in situ divergence, but can also result from multiple colonizations of previously diverged lineages. Here, using genome-wide data from a large population sample, we test the hypothesis that intra-island divergence explains the occurrence of four geographical forms meetin...
Preprint
Full-text available
Chromosomal organization is relatively stable among avian species, especially for sex chromosomes. Sylvioidea species, however, harbor a unique pair of neo-sex chromosomes, originating from a parallel translocation of a region of the ancestral 4A chromosome on both W and Z chromosomes. In this study, we took advantage of this unusual event to study...
Article
Assessing the relative contributions of immigration and diversification into the buildup of species diversity is key to understanding the role of historical processes in driving biogeographical and diversification patterns in species-rich regions. Here, we investigated how colonization, in situ speciation, and extinction history may have generated...

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