Mae Goder-Goldberger

Mae Goder-Goldberger
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev | bgu · Department of Bible, Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies

Doctor of Philosophy

About

45
Publications
15,360
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713
Citations
Citations since 2016
31 Research Items
653 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
Introduction
I do research in prehistory with a focus on lithic technology and human landscape interaction in the Middle and Upper Paleolithic . My current project (PI's are I. Gilead, Ben Gurion University and O. Crouvi, Geological Survey of Israel) aiming to elucidate interaction between landscape evolution and human settlement patterns within the lower Besor basin.
Additional affiliations
January 2015 - February 2016
Weizmann Institute of Science
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2008 - October 2014
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (45)
Article
Full-text available
A series of short successive occupations were revealed at the new Middle Paleolithic site of Emanuel Cave. A date of 191±1 Ka (U/Th) is suggested as a terminus post quem for the archaeological deposits. Despite the ephemeral nature of the site, the lithic assemblage displays two distinct facies; the lower layers with a predominantly laminar nature...
Article
Full-text available
Nubian Levallois cores, now known from sites in eastern Africa, the Nile Valley and Arabia, have been used as a material culture marker for Upper Pleistocene dispersals of hominins out of Africa. The Levantine corridor, being the only land route connecting Africa to Eurasia, has been viewed as a possible dispersal route. We report here on lithic as...
Article
Full-text available
This is a report of results from a cursory survey of several Middle Paleolithic find spots from the Arava, Israel, conducted as part of a broader collaboration between the Dead Sea and Arava Science Center and the Israel Antiquities Authority. A series of find spots were recorded on the eastern flanks of the Zehiha hills and on the northern terrace...
Chapter
The flint assemblage presented here originated in Strata V–II (Table 3.1) and from all areas of EB I habitation (A, B, D, G–M; Area C is part of the Byzantine settlement, and no flint artifacts were recovered from Areas E and F; see AB I).1 Of 3826 flint artifacts collected during excavation, this study focuses on 2647 that were retrieved from clea...
Article
Full-text available
Classification of the Paleolithic into Lower, Middle, and Upper has both chronological and cultural meanings serving as a framework for reconstructing cultural evolution and interpreting behavioral processes. Traditionally, the Middle-to-Upper Paleolithic transition in Eurasia is regarded as a bio-cultural turning point, in which local Neanderthals...
Article
Full-text available
Blinkhorn et al. 1 present a reanalysis of fossil and lithic material from Garrod's 1928 excavation at Shukbah Cave, identifying the presence of Nubian Levallois cores and points in direct association with a Neanderthal molar. The authors argue that this demonstrates the Nubian reduction strategy forms a part of the wider Middle Palaeolithic lithic...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents the results of the salvage excavations at Netzer Sereni in the Mediterranean Coastal Plain of Israel. The site was uncovered within alluvial sand. The sand infills a depression between two aeolianite (kurkar) ridges, where local runoff accumulated probably due to local sand damming, redepositing sandy and clay-rich sediments. Sl...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents the results of the salvage excavations at Netzer Sereni in the Mediterranean Coastal Plain of Israel. The site was uncovered within alluvial sand. The sand infills a depression between two aeolianite (kurkar) ridges, where local runoff accumulated probably due to local sand damming, redepositing sandy and clay-rich sediments. Sl...
Article
Significance The Initial Upper Paleolithic (IUP) marks a distinct cultural change possibly related to Homo sapiens dispersals into Eurasia. New radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence dates from the recent excavations at Boker Tachtit, Negev, Israel, show that the IUP starts as early as around 50,000 y ago, and the later IUP phase dates t...
Book
Full-text available
The late Pleistocene (~75,000-15,000 years ago) is a key period for the prehistory of the Nile Valley. The climatic fluctuations documented during this period have led human populations to adapt to a changing Nile. In particular, major environmental changes in the Nile headwaters, such as the desiccation of some major eastern African lakes, influen...
Chapter
Full-text available
During the late Pleistocene several events of technological diffusion, possibly due to human dispersals are recorded in the lithic assemblages of eastern Africa, the Nile Valley and the southern Levant. Most notable is the spread/diffusion of the Nubian technology associated with MIS 5. Evidence of contact between eastern Africa and the Nile valley...
Article
Manot Cave contains important human fossils and archaeological assemblages related to the origin and dispersal of anatomically modern humans and the Upper Paleolithic period. This record is divided between an elevated in situ occupation area and a connecting talus. We, thus, investigated the interplay between the accumulation of the sediments and t...
Article
Situated at the crossroads of Africa and Eurasia, the Levant is a crucial region for understanding the origins and spread of Upper Paleolithic (UP) traditions associated with the spread of modern humans. Of the two local Early Upper Paleolithic technocomplexes, the Ahmarian and the Levantine Aurignacian, the latter appears to be unique in the endem...
Article
Far’ah II is an open-air site in the north western Negev desert (Israel). Previous excavations in the 1970’s revealed a rich, in situ Middle Paleolithic (MP) assemblage composed of flint and limestone artifacts, animal bones and charcoal. Renewed excavation at the site were undertaken in 2017, to re-date it and provide a more accurate constrain to...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The extent that hunter-gatherer societies are found today within marginal eco-systems has often been explained as a result of their displacement from more favorable habitats by agricultural societies. Yet, recent studies have shown that modern hunter-gatherer population density can be correlated with abundance and stability of exploited resources,...
Article
Full-text available
The Besor is the largest drainage basin in the Negev desert encompassing variable landscapes and a range of ecological zones. The dry riverbed, a salient feature in the landscape, has been used for thousands of years as a major route crossing from the central Negev Highlands to the coastal plain. Although the lower Besor drainage basin has been the...
Article
For more than a century, prehistoric research has focused on cave sites and rock shelters, mostly because of good preservation of organic remains associated with stratified anthropogenic layers. Manot Cave in the Western Galilee, Israel offers the possibility of studying prehistoric assemblages in pristine condition because of the collapse of the c...
Article
A well-preserved sequence of Early Upper Paleolithic (EUP) occupations has been revealed in the past decade in Manot Cave, the studies of which shed light on the cultural dynamics and subsistence patterns and paleoenvironment. Most intriguing is the series of overlying Levantine Aurignacian occupation layers, exposed near the entrance to the cave....
Article
The transition from the Middle Paleolithic to the Upper Paleolithic in the Levant represents a major event in human prehistory with regards to the dispersal of modern human populations. Unfortunately, the scarcity of human remains from this period has hampered our ability to study the anatomy of Upper Paleolithic populations. This study describes a...
Chapter
Full-text available
Manot Cave is situated within the Levantine Mediterranean region. The site has an extensive Upper Paleolithic sequence, also manifesting the presence of a Middle Paleolithic occupation. This study will present the Middle Paleolithic assemblage from the cave. One of the Levallois centripetal cores from the assemblage exhibits, what seems to be non-...
Article
Full-text available
The timing of archeological industries in the Levant is central for understanding the spread of modern humans with Upper Paleolithic traditions. We report a high-resolution radiocarbon chronology for Early Upper Paleolithic industries (Early Ahmarian and Levantine Aurignacian) from the newly excavated site of Manot Cave, Israel. The dates confirm t...
Article
The Early Upper Palaeolithic in the Levant plays an important role in understanding the emergence, dispersal, and adaptations of the first Anatomically Modern Human (AMH) populations in the Levant and Europe. The technical exploitation of osseous raw materials, represented by the new concepts applied to the antler working, is recognized as one of s...
Thesis
Abstract Dispersals of anatomically modern humans out of eastern Africa, are reflected in the fossil record of western and northern Africa and the Levant. These dispersals are supported by genetic studies, but difficult to detect in the archaeological material record. The Multiple Dispersal Model (Lahr and Foley 1998), also known as the Biogeograph...
Article
Full-text available
A key event in human evolution is the expansion of modern humans of African origin across Eurasia between 60 and 40 thousand years (kyr) before present (bp), replacing all other forms of hominins. Owing to the scarcity of human fossils from this period, these ancestors of all present-day non-African modern populations remain largely enigmatic. Here...
Article
There is clear evidence of lithic technological variability in Middle Paleolithic (MP) assemblages along the Nile valley and in adjacent desert areas. One of the identified variants is the Khormusan, the type-site of which, Site 1017, is located north of the Nile’s Second Cataract. The industry has two distinctive characteristics that set it apart...
Article
Our ongoing research has revealed that Manot Cave was intensively occupied during the Upper Palaeolithic period. Located within the Mediterranean woodland region and with its multi-layered units and thick archaeological accumulations, Manot Cave has the potential of refining the Levantine Upper Palaeolithic cultural sequence. This is especially tru...
Conference Paper
Digitizing excavation data: Amud Cave is a late Middle Paleolithic site in Israel (68-55 thousand years ago), presenting a stratigraphic sequence of dense human occupations coupled with complex site formation processes, and spatial patterning within coeval deposits throughout the cave. The most recent excavations at the site ended in 1994, prior to...

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Projects

Projects (6)
Project
Leplongeon Alice, Goder-Goldberger Mae & Pleurdeau David (eds) 2020 — Not just a Corridor. Human occupation of the Nile Valley and neighbouring regions between 75,000 and 15,000 years ago. Paris : Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, 364 p. (Natures en Sociétés ; 3). More information about the publication here: http://sciencepress.mnhn.fr/en/collections/natures-en-societes/not-just-a-corridor This publication is one of the outcomes of the workshop organised in Paris at the French National Museum of Natural History (Musée de l'Homme) and Institut de Paléontologie Humain in June 2018, with funding from the Wenner-Gren Foundation and the ANR Project Big Dry. More information about the workshop here: https://notjustacorridor.jimdofree.com/
Project
>Reconstruction of climate and vegetation changes >Impact of humans on the environment >Reveal the agricultural history
Project
UISPP XIX, Meknes 1-6 September 2020 - Session ID 287849 Session is open for abstracts. We look forward to a vibrant discussion relating to the interaction between core and peripheral societies as complementary segments of past settlement systems and their manifestation in the archaeological record.