Madeleine Wyatt

Madeleine Wyatt
University of Kent | KENT · Kent Business School

BSc, MSc & PhD Psychology

About

11
Publications
4,437
Reads
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154
Citations
Introduction
I'm a Chartered Occupational Psychologist and lecturer in Human Resource Management (HRM) and Organisational Behaviour at the University of Kent. My research examines diversity and the role of informal and political behaviour in the workplace. I also conduct research with local and national politicians to examine political performance from an organisational psychology perspective.
Additional affiliations
October 2011 - present
University of Kent
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) employees appear to experience more difficulty reaching senior leadership positions than their white counterparts. Using Eagly and Carli’s (2007) metaphor of the labyrinth our aim was to give voice to black and minority ethnic managers who have successfully achieved senior management roles, and compare their leadersh...
Article
Full-text available
This study conceptualizes politicians as political workers. It describes a multimethod study with two aims: (1) to determine whether politicians share a latent mental model of performance in political roles and (2) to test hypothesized relationships between politician self-rated characteristics (i.e., extroversion, neuroticism, conscientiousness, M...
Article
Full-text available
Effective selection tools are important for identifying high caliber employees in SMEs, yet few SMEs use tools created using ‘best practice’ methodology. Selection literature tends to focus on large organizations and is conceptual rather than empirical; which may make it difficult for SMEs to use a best practice approach. This article addresses thi...
Preprint
Political candidate personality and electoral success in a British General Election. Self-rated political skill and political efficacy prior to election campaign as predictors of candidate electoral performance.
Chapter
Full-text available
Democracy was forged in the furnaces of oppression, whether combatting tyranny or affirming the rights of the individual. As democracy is under threat in many parts of the world, there has never been a more urgent need to understand political thoughts and behaviours. This lucid and accessible book brings together a global group of scholars from psy...
Article
Full-text available
Integrating Social/Political Influence Theory with the Theory of Planned Behavior, we argue that personal resources (i.e., political skill, self‐efficacy) enable political candidates to form more ambitious campaign intentions, and thus perform better in elections. We tested this model with a sample of political candidates (N = 225) campaigning in a...
Article
This inductive study extends scholarship on gender, feedback and leadership by drawing on a large naturalistic data set of 1057 narrative developmental feedback comments to 146 political leaders in the UK. We used automated topic modeling, a novel methodology, to identify 12 underlying topics within developmental feedback, and complemented this wit...
Article
Full-text available
Are the traits preferred by voters also associated with success in political office? Drawing on the ascription-actuality trait theory of leadership the present study examines whether traits ascribed to politicians predict leadership outcomes differently to the actual traits they possess. We collected self-ratings of politicians' personality (N = 13...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper is part of a wider project that investigates how organisational and individual factors within the workplace contribute to social class differences and inequality. In doing so, it examines the relative impact of objective and subjective indicators of social class on explicit (e.g. salary, occupational status, promotions) and implicit (e.g...
Article
Full-text available
In 1882 Robert Louis Stevenson commented that 'Politics is perhaps the only profession for which no preparation is deemed necessary', and today it seems that his comments still hold. Despite a wealth of understanding in work psychology about how to train and support people in work roles, very few efforts have been made to apply this knowledge to po...

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