Madeleine Greig

Madeleine Greig
University of British Columbia - Okanagan | UBC Okanagan · School of Nursing

About

12
Publications
4,943
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
277
Citations
Citations since 2016
12 Research Items
276 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
Introduction

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
More students than ever are electing to take part in international practicums from health-related disciplines. With the goal of better understanding the moral experiences and ethical implications of global health practicums (GHPs), the purpose of this Interpretive Descriptive study was to examine the moral uncertainty of nursing students from one u...
Article
Full-text available
Nurses play a central role in Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD) in Canada. However, we know little about nurses’ experiences with this new end-of-life option. The purpose of this study was to explore how nurses construct good nursing practice in the context of MAiD. This was a qualitative interview study using Interpretive Description. Fifty-nine...
Article
Full-text available
Aims and Objectives To describes nurses’ moral experiences with MAiD in the Canadian context. Background Nurses perform important roles in MAiD in Canada and do so within a unique context in which MAiD is provided through healthcare services and where accessibility is an important principle. International literature indicates that participating in...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD) was legalized in Canada in June, 2016. The Canadian government's decision to legislate assisted dying, an approach that requires a high degree of obligation, precision, and delegation, has resulted in unique challenges for health care and for nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to better u...
Article
Full-text available
In June 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada struck down the Criminal Code's prohibition on assisted death. Just over a year later, the federal government crafted legislation to entrench medical assistance in dying (MAiD), the term used in Canada in place of physician‐assisted death. Notably, Canada became the first country to allow nurse practitioner...
Article
Full-text available
With the advent of legalized medical assistance in dying [MAiD] in Canada in 2016, nursing is facing intriguing new ethical and theoretical challenges. Among them is the concept of conscientious objection, which was built into the legislation as a safeguard to protect the rights of healthcare workers who feel they cannot participate in something th...
Article
Full-text available
The conceptualization of assisted death as an act performed by physicians has resulted in a lack of attention to nurses' roles and experiences with the processes that surround an assisted death. In this article, we synthesize evidence from 6 articles focusing on the experiences of 55 nurses from Canada, Belgium, and the Netherlands, with relevant e...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Medical Assistance in Dying, also known as euthanasia or assisted suicide, is expanding internationally. Canada is the first country to permit Nurse Practitioners to provide euthanasia. These developments highlight the need for nurses to reflect upon the moral and ethical issues that euthanasia presents for nursing practice. Purpose:...
Article
Full-text available
Canada's legalization of Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD) in 2016 has had important implications for nursing regulators. Evidence indicates that registered nurses perform key roles in ensuring high-quality care for patients receiving MAiD. Further, Canada is the first country to recognize nurse practitioners as MAiD assessors and providers. The p...
Article
Background: Nurses and nursing care providers provide the most direct care to patients at end of life. Yet, evidence indicates that many feel ill-prepared for the complexity of palliative care. Objective: To review the resources required to ensure adequate education, training, and mentorship for nurses and nursing care providers who care for Can...
Article
Full-text available
Background A compassionate community approach to palliative care provides important rationale for building community-based hospice volunteer capacity. In this project, we piloted one such capacity-building model in which volunteers and a nurse partnered to provide navigation support beginning in the early palliative phase for adults living in commu...
Article
There is a growing body of evidence investigating chaplaincy services. The purpose of this scoping review was to examine the empirical literature specific to the role of chaplaincy within health care published since 2009. Electronic searches of four databases were conducted in August 2015. After screening, 48 studies were retained and reviewed. Fou...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
For adults living with serious illness, aging in place is key to quality of life but without adequate support can result in heavy symptom burden and social isolation. Older adults may not be aware of health and social resources available in their communities, so we have developed an innovative model to provide navigation services. In this person-centered approach, trained volunteer navigators advocate, facilitate community connections, coordinate access to services/resources, and promote active engagement of older adults with their community (Nav-CARE: Navigation - Connecting, Accessing, Resourcing, and Engaging). Our team is now in the process of adapting, implementing, and evaluating the Nav-CARE model in communities across Canada.