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Maciej Telszewski

Maciej Telszewski
International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP) · Institute of Oceanology of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IO PAN)

PhD

About

46
Publications
23,724
Reads
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3,445
Citations
Citations since 2016
18 Research Items
2846 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
Introduction
As the IOCCP Project Director I develop program priorities and coordinate the highly diverse set of ocean carbon activities (e.g. ocean acidification, repeat hydrography, underway pCO2 observations, surface and interior ocean synthesis activities, data products, standards and methods) through extensive coordination and dialogue with the scientific community via national and international organizations, scientific steering committees, scientific workshops, and expert meetings.
Additional affiliations
April 2012 - present
International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP)
Position
  • Managing Director
April 2012 - April 2015
Institute of Oceanology Polish Academy of Sciences
Position
  • Professor
January 2011 - March 2012
International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP)
Position
  • Managing Director
Education
January 2006 - October 2009
University of East Anglia
Field of study
  • Marine Biogeochemistry
October 1999 - August 2005
University of Gdansk
Field of study
  • Physical Oceanography

Publications

Publications (46)
Working Paper
Full-text available
The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) is a synthesis of quality-controlled fCO2 (fugacity of carbon dioxide) values for the global surface oceans and coastal seas with regular updates. Version 3 of SOCAT has 14.5 million fCO2 values from 3646 data sets covering the years 1957 to 2014. This latest version has an additional 4.4 million fCO2 values rela...
Article
Air-sea CO2 fluxes over the Pacific Ocean are known to be characterized by coherent large-scale structures that reflect not only ocean subduction and upwelling patterns, but also the combined effects of wind-driven gas exchange and biology. On the largest scales, a large net CO influx into the extratropics is associated with a robust seasonal cycle...
Article
Full-text available
The oceans are a major sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Historically, observations have been too sparse to allow accurate tracking of changes in rates of CO2 uptake over ocean basins, so little is known about how these vary. Here, we show observations indicating substantial variability in the CO2 uptake by the North Atlantic on time scale...
Article
Full-text available
Here we present monthly, basin-wide maps of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) for the North Atlantic on a 1� latitude by 1� longitude grid for years 2004 through 2006 inclusive. The maps have been computed using a neural network technique which reconstructs the non-linear relationships between three biogeochemical parameters and marine...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we outline the need for a coordinated international effort toward the building of an open-access Global Ocean Oxygen Database and ATlas (GO2DAT) complying with the FAIR principles (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable).
Article
Full-text available
The ocean is mitigating global warming by absorbing large amounts of excess carbon dioxide from human activities. To quantify and monitor the ocean carbon sink, we need a state-of-the-art data resource that makes data submission and retrieval machine-compatible and efficient.
Technical Report
Full-text available
Full report available from https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000376708.locale=en doi:10.25607/h0gj-pq41
Article
Full-text available
Multidisciplinary ocean observing activities provide critical ocean information to satisfy ever-changing socioeconomic needs and require coordinated implementation. The upper oxycline (transition between high and low oxygen waters) is fundamentally important for the ecosystem structure and can be a useful proxy for multiple observing objectives con...
Article
Full-text available
Early-career scientists came together recently to learn to use a suite of ocean biogeochemical sensors, with the goal of closing the knowledge gap between ocean technology and potential end users.
Article
Full-text available
The Global Ocean Data Analysis Project (GLODAP) is a synthesis effort providing regular compilations of surface to bottom ocean biogeochemical data, with an emphasis on seawater inorganic carbon chemistry and related variables determined through chemical analysis of water samples. This update of GLODAPv2, v2.2019, adds data from 116 cruises to the...
Article
Full-text available
The Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) and its partners have worked together over the past decade to break down barriers between open-ocean and coastal observing, between scientific disciplines, and between operational and research institutions. Here we discuss some GOOS successes and challenges from the past decade, and present ideas for moving...
Article
Full-text available
The Surface Ocean CO2 NETwork (SOCONET) and atmospheric Marine Boundary Layer (MBL) CO2 measurements from ships and buoys focus on the operational aspects of measurements of CO2 in both the ocean surface and atmospheric MBLs. The goal is to provide accurate pCO2 data to within 2 micro atmosphere (μatm) for surface ocean and 0.2 parts per million (p...
Article
Full-text available
A successful integrated ocean acidification (OA) observing network must include (1) scientists and technicians from a range of disciplines from physics to chemistry to biology to technology development; (2) government, private, and intergovernmental support; (3) regional cohorts working together on regionally specific issues; (4) publicly accessibl...
Article
Full-text available
The oceans play a key role in global issues such as climate change, food security, and human health. Given their vast dimensions and internal complexity, efficient monitoring and predicting of the planet’s ocean must be a collaborative effort of both regional and global scale. A first and foremost requirement for such collaborative ocean observing...
Article
Full-text available
The oceans play a key role in global issues such as climate change, food security, and human health. Given their vast dimensions and internal complexity, efficient monitoring and predicting of the planet's ocean must be a collaborative effort of both regional and global scale. A first and foremost requirement for such collaborative ocean observing...
Article
Full-text available
The Global Ocean Data Analysis Project (GLODAP) is a synthesis effort providing regular compilations of surface to bottom ocean biogeochemical data, with an emphasis on seawater inorganic carbon 40 chemistry and related variables determined through chemical analysis of water samples. This update of GLODAPv2, v2.2019, adds data from 116 cruises to t...
Article
Full-text available
Beneath the waves, oxygen disappears As plastic waste pollutes the oceans and fish stocks decline, unseen below the surface another problem grows: deoxygenation. Breitburg et al. review the evidence for the downward trajectory of oxygen levels in increasing areas of the open ocean and coastal waters. Rising nutrient loads coupled with climate chang...
Article
Full-text available
The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) is a synthesis of quality-controlled fCO2 (fugacity of carbon dioxide) values for the global surface oceans and coastal seas with regular updates. Version 3 of SOCAT has 14.7 million fCO2 values from 3646 data sets covering the years 1957 to 2014. This latest version has an additional 4.6 million fCO2 values rela...
Article
The accumulation of carbon within the Weddell Gyre, and its exchanges across the gyre boundaries are investigated with three recent full-depth oceanographic sections enclosing this climatically-important region. The combination of carbon measurements with ocean circulation transport estimates from a box inverse analysis reveal that deep water trans...
Article
Monthly maps of sea surface nutrient (phosphate, nitrate and silicate) concentrations were produced for the North Pacific (10–60°N, 120°E–90°W) for the years 2001 to 2010 using a self-organizing map trained with temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-a concentration and mixed layer depth. Nutrient sampling was carried out mainly by ships of opportunity...
Article
Full-text available
A feed-forward neural network is used to create a monthly climatology of the sea surface fugacity of CO 2 (fCO 2) on a 18 3 18 spatial resolution. Using 127 880 data points from 1990 to 2011 in the track-gridded database of the Surface Ocean CO 2 Atlas version 2.0 (Bakker et al.), the model yields a global mean fCO 2 increase rate of 1.50 matm yr 2...
Article
Full-text available
The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT), an activity of the international marine carbon research community, provides access to synthesis and gridded fCO2 (fugacity of carbon dioxide) products for the surface oceans. Version 2 of SOCAT is an update of the previous release (version 1) with more data (increased from 6.3 million to 10.1 million surface wat...
Article
Full-text available
The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT), an activity of the international marine carbon research community, provides access to synthesis and gridded fCO2 (fugacity of carbon dioxide) products for the surface oceans. Version 2 of SOCAT is an update of the previous release (version 1) with more data (increased from 6.3 million to 10.1 million surface wat...
Article
Full-text available
This study produced maps of the partial pressure of oceanic carbon dioxide (pCO2sea) in the North Pacific on a 0.25° latitude × 0.25° longitude grid from 2002 to 2008. The pCO2sea values were estimated by using a self-organizing map neural network technique to explain the non-linear relationships between observed pCO2sea data and four oceanic param...
Article
Full-text available
The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) is an effort by the international marine carbon research community. It aims to improve access to carbon dioxide measurements in the surface oceans by regular releases of quality controlled and fully documented synthesis and gridded fCO2 (fugacity of carbon dioxide) products. SOCAT version 2 presented here extends...
Article
Full-text available
As a response to public demand for a welldocumented, quality controlled, publically available, global surface ocean carbon dioxide (CO2) data set, the international marine carbon science community developed the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT). The first SOCAT product is a collection of 6.3 million quality controlled surface CO2 data from the global...
Article
Full-text available
A well-documented, publicly available, global data set of surface ocean carbon dioxide (CO2) parameters has been called for by international groups for nearly two decades. The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) project was initiated by the international marine carbon science community in 2007 with the aim of providing a comprehensive, publicly availab...
Article
Full-text available
Air-sea CO2 fluxes over the Pacific Ocean are known to be characterized by coherent large-scale structures that reflect not only ocean subduction and upwelling patterns, but also the combined effects of wind-driven gas exchange and biology. On the largest scales, a large net CO2 influx into the extra-tropics is associated with a robust seasonal cyc...
Article
Shipboard biogeochemical time series represent one of the most valuable tools scientists have to quantify marine elemental fluxes and associated biogeochemical processes and to understand their links to changing climate. They provide the long, temporally resolved data sets needed to characterize ocean climate, biogeochemistry, and ecosystem variabi...
Article
Full-text available
As a response to public demand for a well-documented, quality controlled, publically available, global surface ocean carbon dioxide (CO2) data set, the international marine carbon science community developed the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT). The first SOCAT product is a collection of 6.3 million quality controlled surface CO2 data from the globa...
Article
Full-text available
Net oceanic uptake of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) reduces global warming but also leads to ocean acidification [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), 2007]. Understanding and predicting changes in the ocean carbon sink are critical to assessments of future climate change. Surface water CO2 measurements suggest large year-to-...
Article
The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas is now publicly available. It consists of a quality controlled global synthesis data set of surface ocean CO2 data, as well as a gridded product of monthly means.
Article
Full-text available
Some dominant spatial and temporal structures of the North Pacific air-sea CO 2 fluxes in response to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) are identified in four data products from four independent sources: an assimilated CO 2 flux product, two forward model so-lutions, and a gridded pCO 2 dataset constructed with a neural network approach. The 5...
Article
Full-text available
Here we present monthly, basin-wide maps of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) for the North Atlantic on a 1° latitude by 1° longitude grid for years 2004 through 2006 inclusive, constructed using a neural network technique which reconstructs the non-linear relationships between 3 biogeochemical parameters and marine pCO2. A self organiz...
Article
Full-text available
As part of the U. K. contribution to the international Surface Ocean-Lower Atmosphere Study, a series of three related projects-DOGEE, SEASAW, and HiWASE-undertook experimental studies of the processes controlling the physical exchange of gases and sea spray aerosol at the sea surface. The studies share a common goal: to reduce the high degree of u...
Article
Full-text available
The primary instrumentation that deals with the problems of parameterizing the physical exchange of gases and aerosol at the air-sea interface has been described while some additional details of measurement systems and techniques have been provided. The measurement systems being discussed include the autoflux, wave measurements, aerosol measurement...
Article
This document is a supplement to “Physical Exchanges at the Air–Sea Interface: UK–SOLAS Field Measurements,” by Ian M. Brooks, Margaret J. Yelland, Robert C. Upstill-Goddard, Philip D. Nightingale, Steve Archer, Eric d’Asaro, Rachael Beale, Cory Beatty, Byron Blomquist, A. Anthony Bloom, Barbara J. Brooks, John Cluderay, David Coles, John Dacey, Mi...

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Projects (3)
Project
Mission ICOS RI: To enable research to understand the greenhouse gas (GHG) budgets and perturbations Provides the long-term observations required to understand the present state and predict future behaviour of the global carbon cycle and GHG emissions Technological developments and implementations, related to GHGs, will be promoted by the linking of research, education and innovation ICOS aim to provide an accurate tool to independently measure, calculate and model European nations emissions of GHG. An independent tool is important to make sure that European nations follow up the Paris agreement The first objectives To provide effective access to a single and coherent data set to facilitate research into multi-scale analysis of GHG emissions and sinks, and the processes that determine their strength Aims to establish a template for the future development of similar integrated and operative GHG observation networks also outside Europe The second objectives To provide vital information for current evaluation and future forecast of regional budgets of greenhouse gas sources and sinks, their human and natural drivers, and the controlling mechanisms Detect changes in regional greenhouse gas fluxes, early warning of negative developments and the response of natural fluxes to extreme climate events To reduce uncertainties in Earth System models and their predictions
Project
The IOCCP promotes the development of a global network of ocean carbon observations for research through technical coordination and communication services, international agreements on standards and methods, and advocacy and links to the global observing systems.