Macall Gordon

Macall Gordon
Antioch University Seattle · Department of Psychology

Master of Arts
Researching congruence between popular sleep advice and research; effect of temperament on sleep training outcomes

About

9
Publications
13,718
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
0
Citations
Introduction
My work focuses on the intersection of popular parenting advice about infant sleep and underlying research. A related research thread is the impact of an alert/intense/sensitve temperament on sleep and parenting.
Additional affiliations
April 2017 - present
Maven Clinic
Position
  • Consultant
Description
  • Maven is an online women's healthcare portal. I consult with parents about their child's sleep.
October 2008 - December 2008
Gottman Institute
Position
  • Research Assistant
July 2008 - present
Antioch University Seattle
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • Teach Introduction to Research Methods to all graduate counseling students in the Mental Health Counseling, Marriage & Family Therapy, Art Therapy, and Drama Therapy tracks.
Education
September 2002 - May 2007
Antioch University Seattle
Field of study
  • Applied Psychology - Infant Mental Health
September 1979 - June 1983
Stanford University
Field of study
  • Human Biology

Publications

Publications (9)
Poster
Full-text available
(NOTE: This research is currently being updated to reflect research since 2007 and will be presented Summer of 2022 -- See separate listing for this poster). ABSTRACT: The most empirically supported and endorsed approaches to preventing or ameliorating infant sleep problems involve various forms of extinction (crying it out). This approach is wide...
Poster
Full-text available
Approximately 10% of infants can be classified as difficult (Thomas & Chess, 1977) (also irritable, fussy, temperamentally frustrated, or unsettled). Such terms refer to a constellation of traits related to difficulties with self-regulation and heightened reactivity resulting from low sensory thresholds and higher levels of emotional intensity (Rot...
Poster
Full-text available
While studies have been conducted to ascertain the experience of parenting a gifted child post-identification, less is known about the experience prior to identification, particularly in infancy. Many psychologists and psychiatrists traditionally equate giftedness with high IQ. However, giftedness is no longer seen in a unitary manner and confined...
Poster
Full-text available
Research and parenting advice consistently endorse the use of extinction to improve sleep in infants as young as 2- to 4-months and further submits that the intervention is fast, effective, and without side effects. Parents are told that crying will be worst on the first night and will quickly be extinguished in 3-4 nights. While it is understood t...
Poster
This research reviews the literature on the use of extinction for sleep in infants with a special focus on parenting advice endorsing the preventive use of extinction in infants under six months. The paper compares claims in popular advice to existing research to evaluate the congruence of advice with research and real-world parenting practice.
Poster
Full-text available
This poster provides information for clinicians about normative sleep development and easy strategies that they can offer to mothers with postpartum mood challenges. Information is developmentally-focused and considers the whole family system.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
For parents and professionals, “sleeping through the night” has grown in both importance and urgency as a necessary benchmark for infant as young as 3- to 6-months of age. Contemporary research contends that failure to establish unbroken nighttime sleep by 6-months of age may result in poor daytime behavior, family stress, and sleep problems in the...
Poster
Full-text available
Three important questions are covered in this poster: • Does nightwaking that involves parental attention invariably constitute a sleep problem for children and parents? • Does a paradigm of independent, self-settling infant sleep patterns represent a solution or an added stressor? • Are children’s nighttime behaviors and parental sleep interventio...
Poster
Full-text available
Background: At one time, sleep deprivation was synonymous with early parenting. Today, “sleeping through the night” has grown in importance and urgency and parents increasingly turn to the popular media for guidance (Simpson, 1997). Such sources, however, can be inconsistent and even inaccurate in matters concerning child health and development (Im...

Network

Projects

Projects (6)
Project
Parents of young children in the U.S. can be at risk for burnout. Children who are temperamentally more intense, sensitive, persistent, and engaged require more from their parents. It is likely that burnout among these parents is even more prevalent. Some research has looked at the child's personality factors as contributory to outcomes; however, an examination of how temperament might influence burnout, especially among mothers has not been examined.
Project
To assess the effectiveness of parental fading (gradual withdrawal of active soothing behavior before sleep) versus graduated extinction to improve sleep onset and nightwaking in 6-month-old infants. Two intervention groups will be compared to a sleep hygiene info-only control group and a non-intervention control group.
Project
Approximately 10% of infants can be classified as difficult (Thomas & Chess, 1977) (also irritable, fussy, temperamentally frustrated, or unsettled). Such terms refer to a constellation of traits related to difficulties with self-regulation and heightened reactivity resulting from low sensory thresholds and higher levels of emotional intensity (Rothbart, 2011). Temperamentally difficult infants typically have eating and/or sleeping problems (Novosad et al., 1999), are more reactive, and less able to calm down without assistance (Calkins et al., 2002). As a result, parents experience higher rates of stress (e.g. Oddi et al., 2013), depression, and anxiety (e.g. Britton, 2011). Popular parenting discourse has identified various positive aspects of a challenging temperament. These constructions (e.g. active/alert, Budd, 2003; highly sensitive, Aron, 2002; high needs, Sears & Sears, 1996; spirited, Kurcinka, 1999) highlight both the challenge and the potential value of difficult traits. While parents of temperamentally-intense children report significant problems with sleep, self-soothing, and tantrum behaviors, they also report high levels of alertness, perceptiveness, empathy, and precocious verbal and/or motor ability (Kurcinka, 2011). Are there, then, potential “upsides” of difficult infant temperament that have been overlooked by the existing focus on risk factors?