Maayan Davidovitz

Maayan Davidovitz
New York University | NYU · Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service

Doctor of Philosophy

About

12
Publications
909
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79
Citations
Citations since 2016
12 Research Items
79 Citations
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Introduction
I am a Postdoctoral Fellow at the New York University Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. My research lies at the intersection of public policy, public administration, policy implementation, street-level bureaucracy, educational policy, and social policy. Website: https://www.maayandavidovitz.com/

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
The literature dealing with representative bureaucracy emphasizes the role that minority street-level bureaucrats may play when, directly and indirectly, they actively represent clients with whom they share a common identity. My study goes further, contributing to the implementation literature, by examining why and how these street-level bureaucrat...
Article
Full-text available
How does the marketization of social service provision impact the practices of street-level bureaucrats (SLBs) towards their clients? To explore this question, we compare the markets for ambulatory long-term care for the elderly in Germany and Israel, which differ in the latitude of choice offered to clients and the intensity of state regulation. B...
Article
This study on the long-term care sectors for the elderly in Germany and Israel shows that in both countries, street-level workers mostly use their discretionary space to move towards clients. Based on 52 semi-structured interviews, we found that this tendency is to a considerable extent a product of organizational influences and orientations. These...
Article
Do street-level bureaucrats exercise discretion to encourage clients’ political participation? If so, how, and in what way is it demonstrated? This study examines these questions empirically through 36 semi-structured in-depth interviews with LGBTQ+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer) teachers in Israel. Findings reveal that these stre...
Article
Full-text available
Which types of clients increase or decrease the trust of street-level bureaucrats (SLBs)? Using interviews and focus groups with two groups of Israeli social service providers--teachers and social workers- --and comparing them, -we develop a theoretical framework for determining the types of clients who evoke and reduce the trust of SLBs. Our findi...
Article
Does political rhetoric play a role in street-level bureaucrats policy implementation? If so, how? We examine this question through in-depth semi-structured interviews with 31 Israeli LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer) teachers. Our findings demonstrate that when politicians express anti-LGBTQ rhetoric that contradicts the ideol...
Article
Trust betrayal is a subjective feeling of a street-level bureaucrat (SLB) that a client acted contrary to expectations, diminishing the former’s belief in the latter’s good intentions. How do SLBs experience a betrayal of trust by clients? How do such betrayals shape the future ways in which SLBs cope with clients? We investigate these questions em...
Article
How do different types of social service providers experience and respond to violent clients? The street-level social service environment is a fertile ground for manifestations of violence by dissatisfied clients. This study examines the violence, verbal and physical, to which street-level bureaucrats are exposed, and the different coping strategie...
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Full-text available
The study explores whether elected officials' involvement in the way street-level bureaucrats implement policy affects social equity. This question is addressed empirically through interviews and focus groups with 84 Israeli educators and social workers. Findings indicate that elected officials involve themselves directly and indirectly in street-l...
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Full-text available
Trust is the “glue” connecting state and society and particularly relevant to how front-line workers, who are the face of public administration vis-à-vis citizens, implement policy. Therefore, it is important to examine how front-line workers’ absence of trust in regulators influences the ways they cope with their clients. Our study investigates th...
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Full-text available
What are the implications of governmental response to crises for street-level implementation? The COVID-19 pandemic presents a unique opportunity to compare the formal role that decision-makers require of street-level bureaucrats (SLBs) during a crisis to normal conditions. Textual analysis of 36 legislative documents and emergency regulations in I...
Article
Full-text available
According to public management literature, trust has a positive influence on behavior. Why, then, do street-level bureaucrats (SLBs) appear to favor clients whom they do not trust, and give less attention to those they do trust? Do organizational conditions play a role in this dynamic? We investigate these issues as they affect Israeli social servi...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
This project's main objective is to understand better street-level bureaucrats' uses of discretionary space in the long-term care sectors for the elderly in Germany and Israel from a comparative perspective.
Project
This project aims to contribute to a comprehensive theoretical understanding of the role played by trust in street-level policy implementation.
Project
This ongoing research project focuses on the issue of street-level bureaucrats and their role in public policy processes. Specifically, I am interested in determining how and why the relationship between managers, frontline workers and clients has changed in an era of markets, managerialism, and choice.