M. Morgan Taylor

M. Morgan Taylor
University of Pennsylvania | UP · Department of Neuroscience

BA

About

12
Publications
909
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352
Citations
Additional affiliations
June 2012 - present
University of Pennsylvania
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2008 - June 2011
Yale University
Position
  • Technician

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Inhibition in thalamorecipient layer 4 simple cells of primary visual cortex is believed to play important roles in establishing visual response properties and integrating visual inputs across their receptive fields (RFs). Simple cell RFs are characterized by nonoverlapping, spatially restricted subregions in which visual stimuli can either increas...
Article
Seminal studies of the thalamocortical circuit in the visual system of the cat have been central to our understanding of sensory encoding. However, thalamocortical synaptic properties remain poorly understood. We used paired recordings, in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and primary visual cortex (V1), to provide the first in vivo characteriza...
Article
[Hubel and Wiesel's (1962)][1] hierarchical model of simple and complex cell receptive fields (RFs) has shaped our understanding of the structure and function of the primary visual cortex (V1). They proposed that the characteristic elongated ON or OFF subregions of simple-cell RFs are constructed
Article
Full-text available
Signaling through GABA(A) receptors controls neural progenitor cell (NPC) development in vitro and is altered in schizophrenic and autistic individuals. However, the in vivo function of GABA(A) signaling on neural stem cell proliferation, and ultimately neurogenesis, remains unknown. To examine GABA(A) function in vivo, we electroporated plasmids e...
Article
Full-text available
Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating and currently incurable neurodevelopmental disease that primarily affects females. RTT is caused by loss of the X-linked gene methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 ( MECP2 ). The resulting decreases in MeCP2 protein levels lead to symptoms such as developmental regression
Article
Full-text available
Neurological symptoms in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and associated brain lesions are thought to arise from abnormal embryonic neurogenesis due to inherited mutations in Tsc1 or Tsc2. Neurogenesis persists postnatally in the human subventricular zone (SVZ) where slow-growing tumors containing Tsc-mutant cells are generated in TSC patients. How...
Article
Adult neurogenesis occurs in two privileged microenvironments, the hippocampal subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone (SVZ) along the lateral ventricle. This review focuses on accumulating evidence suggesting that the activity of specific brain regions or bodily states influences SVZ cell proliferation and neurogenesis. N...
Article
  To identify specific genetic pathways showing altered expression in peripheral blood of depressed subjects with bipolar disorder (BPD).   Illumina Sentrix BeadChip (Human-6v2) microarrays containing >48,000 transcript probes were used to measure levels of gene expression in peripheral blood from 20 depressed subjects with BPD and in 15 healthy co...
Article
It is well established that cerebellar granule cell precursors (GCPs) initially derive from progenitors in the rhombic lip of the embryonic cerebellar primordium. GCPs proliferate and migrate tangentially across the cerebellum to form the external granule cell layer (EGL) in late embryogenesis and early postnatal development. It is unclear whether...
Article
Evidence from a variety of sources suggests that structural alterations in the brain, including neurogenesis, may play a role in both the pathogenesis of mood disorders and the mechanism of action of antidepressants. Previous studies have implicated both the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), and the phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K)-A...
Article
In the neurogenic subventricular zone (SVZ), glial fibrillary acidic protein astrocyte-like cells (called SVZ astrocytes) generate GABA-containing neuroblasts generating olfactory bulb interneurons. GABA controls the number of proliferative SVZ astrocytes through GABAA receptors (GABAARs) suggesting that it may control the production of immature ne...

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