Lynn K Perry

Lynn K Perry
University of Miami | UM · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

54
Publications
10,881
Reads
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888
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2012 - July 2015
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
August 2012
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Field of study
  • Psychology
August 2006 - July 2012
University of Iowa
Field of study
  • Psychology
August 2002 - May 2006
Indiana University Bloomington
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (54)
Article
Children with hearing loss often attend inclusive preschool classrooms aimed at improving their spoken language skills. Although preschool classrooms are fertile environments for vocal interaction with peers, little is known about the dyadic processes that influence children's speech to one another and foster their language abilities and how these...
Article
Full-text available
When a caregiver names objects dominating a child’s view, the association between object and name is unambiguous and children are more likely to learn the object’s name. Children also learn to name things other than solid objects, including nonsolid substances like applesauce. However, it is unknown how caregivers structure linguistic and explorato...
Article
Assessment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) relies on expert clinician observation and judgment, but objective measurement tools have the potential to provide additional information on ASD symptom severity. Diagnostic evaluations for ASD typically include the autism diagnostic observation schedule (ADOS‐2), a semi‐structured assessment composed of...
Article
Full-text available
Current models of COVID-19 transmission predict infection from reported or assumed interactions. Here we leverage high-resolution observations of interaction to simulate infectious processes. Ultra-Wide Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems were employed to track the real-time physical movements and directional orientation of children and t...
Chapter
Audio-visual recording and location tracking produce enormous quantities of digital data with which researchers can document children's everyday interactions in naturalistic settings and assessment contexts. Machine learning and other computational approaches can produce replicable, automated measurements of these big behavioral data. The economies...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic, and the resulting closure of daycare centers worldwide, led to unprecedented changes in children’s learning environments. This period of increased time at home with caregivers, with limited access to external sources (e.g., daycares) provides a unique opportunity to examine the associations between the caregiver-child activit...
Article
Over half of US children are enrolled in preschools, where the quantity and quality of language input from teachers are likely to affect children's language development. Leveraging repeated objective measurements, we examined the rate per minute and phonemic diversity of child and teacher speech-related vocalizations in preschool classrooms and the...
Preprint
Full-text available
Current models of COVID-19 transmission predict infection from reported or assumed interactions. Here we leverage high-resolution observations of interaction to simulate infectious processes. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems were employed to track the real-time physical movements and directional orientation of children and their teache...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose Although children with hearing loss (HL) can benefit from cochlear implants (CIs) and hearing aids (HAs), they often show language delays. Moreover, little is known about the mechanisms by which children with HL learn words. One mechanism by which typically hearing (TH) children learn words is by acquiring word learning biases such as the “...
Article
Children's preschool experiences have consequences for development. However, it is not clear how children's real‐time interactions with peers affect their language development; nor is it clear whether these processes differ between children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and two other groups of children, those with general developmental delays...
Article
One cue that may facilitate children's word learning is iconicity, or the correspondence between a word's form and meaning. Some have even proposed that iconicity in the early lexicon may serve to help children learn how to learn words, supporting the acquisition of even noniconic, or arbitrary, word–referent associations. However, this proposal re...
Preprint
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic, and the resulting closure of daycare centers worldwide, led to unprecedented changes in children’s learning environments. This period of increased time at home with caregivers, with limited access to external sources (e.g., daycares) provides a unique opportunity to examine the associations between the caregiver-child activit...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background. Atypicalities in social approach are thought to be characteristic of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but few studies have quantified the social movement of children with ASD using objective measures. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new method—computational modeling of radio frequency identification (RFID) child...
Article
Images depict specific objects (e.g., a specific dog), yet are named with categorical labels (e.g., "dog"). We examined how semantic representations activated by images may be influenced by implicit labelling. Participants saw images of familiar objects and generated words associated with each image while undergoing transcranial direct current stim...
Article
Full-text available
Long-term literacy outcomes for children with hearing loss, particularly those with severe-to-profound deafness who are fitted with cochlear implants (CIs) lag behind those of children with normal hearing (NH). The causes for these long-term deficits are not fully clear, though differences in auditory access between children who use CIs and those w...
Article
Full-text available
The present study validates a new procedure that combines continuous measures of proximity (Ubisense) and vocalization (LENA) into measures of peer social interaction. The data were collected from 4 boys and 5 girls (ages 2–3 at the outset) on 8 separate days (3–4 hours per day) over the course of an academic year. Teacher reports of friendship wer...
Article
Purpose The particular statistical approach researchers choose is intimately connected to the way they conceptualize their questions, which, in turn, can influence the conclusions they draw. One particularly salient area in which statistics influence our conclusions is in the context of atypical development. Traditional statistical approaches such...
Article
Full-text available
Human observations can only capture a portion of ongoing classroom social activity, and are not ideal for understanding how children’s interactions are spatially structured. Here we demonstrate how social interaction can be investigated by modeling automated continuous measurements of children’s location and movement using a commercial system based...
Presentation
Full-text available
A new methodology for continuous measurement of classroom interactions
Article
The goal of science is to advance our understanding of particular phenomena. However, in the field of development, the phenomena of interest are complex, multifaceted, and change over time. Here, we use three decades of research on the shape bias to argue that while replication is clearly an important part of the scientific process, integration acr...
Article
Full-text available
Children from low SES backgrounds hear, on average, fewer words at home than those from high SES backgrounds. This word gap is associated with widening achievement differences in children’s language abilities and school readiness. However relatively little is known about adult and child speech in childcare settings, in which approximately 30% of Am...
Data
The relationship between time and the number of vocalizations children heard from their peers (log per hour averages). Error bands represent standard error of the mean. Each point represents 1 recording day for 1 child. (PDF)
Data
The relationship between children’s vocalizations and conversational turns (A) and peer vocalizations (B). All vocalizations and turn-taking values are log per hour averages. Error bands represent standard error of the mean. Each point represents 1 recording day for 1 child. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
Some spoken words are iconic, exhibiting a resemblance between form and meaning. We used native speaker ratings to assess the iconicity of 3001 English words, analyzing their iconicity in relation to part-of-speech differences and differences between the sensory domain they relate to (sight, sound, touch, taste and smell). First, we replicated prev...
Article
Iconicity - the correspondence between form and meaning - may help young children learn to use new words. Early-learned words are higher in iconicity than later learned words. However, it remains unclear what role iconicity may play in actual language use. Here, we ask whether iconicity relates not just to the age at which words are acquired, but a...
Article
Unfamiliar speech—spoken in a familiar language but with an accent different from the listener’s—is known to increase comprehension difficulty. However, there is evidence of listeners’ rapid adaptation to unfamiliar accents (although perhaps not to the level of familiar accents). This paradox might emerge from prior focus on isolated word perceptio...
Article
Distinguishing members from non-members of some categories can be accomplished by identifying one or several diagnostic features (e.g. zebra-stripes are diagnostic of zebras). Other categories lack diagnostic features (e.g. dogs). Consequently, distinguishing members from non-members requires attending to many correlated dimensions. Interestingly,...
Article
When a toddler knows a word, what does she actually know? Many categories have multiple relevant properties; for example, shape and color are relevant to membership in the category banana. How do toddlers prioritize these properties when recognizing familiar words, and are there systematic differences among children? In this study, toddlers viewed...
Article
Full-text available
The current study investigated the role of spatial distance in word learning. Two-year-old children saw three novel objects named while the objects were either in close proximity to each other or spatially separated. Children were then tested on their retention for the name-object associations. Keeping the objects spatially separated from each othe...
Article
Full-text available
Signed languages exhibit iconicity (resemblance between form and meaning) across their vocabulary, and many non-Indo-European spoken languages feature sizable classes of iconic words known as ideophones. In comparison, Indo-European languages like English and Spanish are believed to be arbitrary outside of a small number of onomatopoeic words. In t...
Article
Although young children can map a novel name to a novel object, it remains unclear what they actually remember about objects when they initially make such a name–object association. In the current study we investigated (1) what children remembered after they were initially introduced to name–object associations and (2) how their vocabulary size and...
Article
Full-text available
In order to make sense of the “blooming, buzzing, confusion” of a world where no two objects or events are ever exactly identical, infants form categories of perceptually distinct items that can be treated equivalently. The study of categorization often arises from one of two motivations: (1) to examine the mechanisms by which infants learn to trea...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Scholars have documented substantial classes of iconic vocabulary in many non-Indo-European languages. In comparison, Indo-European languages like English are assumed to be arbitrary outside of a small number of onomatopoeic words. In three experiments, we asked English speakers to rate the iconicity of words from the MacArthur-Bates Communicative...
Article
Human concepts differ in their dimensionality. Some, like green-things, require representing one dimension while abstracting over many others. Others, like bird, have higher dimensionality due to numerous category-relevant properties (feathers, two-legs). Converging evidence points to the importance of verbal labels for forming low-dimensional cate...
Article
We examine developmental interactions between context, exploration, and word learning. Infants show an understanding of how nonsolid substances are categorized that does not reliably transfer to learning how these categories are named in laboratory tasks. We argue that what infants learn about naming nonsolid substances is contextually bound - most...
Article
Full-text available
Questions about the relationship between language and thought have long fascinated psychologists, philosophers, and the general public. One specific question is the extent to which verbal labels causally impact cognitive processes—how does calling an object by a particular name influence the way people categorize it; how does knowing words for ment...
Article
Full-text available
Humans and objects, and thus social interactions about objects, exist within space. Words direct listeners' attention to specific regions of space. Thus, a strong correspondence exists between where one looks, one's bodily orientation, and what one sees. This leads to further correspondence with what one remembers. Here, we present data suggesting...
Article
Full-text available
Children acquire attentional biases that help them generalize novel words to novel objects. Researchers have proposed that these biases arise from regularities in the early noun vocabulary children learn and suggest that the specifics of the biases should be tied to the specifics of individual children's vocabularies. However, evidence supporting t...
Article
Full-text available
Research suggests that variability of exemplars supports successful object categorization; however, the scope of variability's support at the level of higher-order generalization remains unexplored. Using a longitudinal study, we examined the role of exemplar variability in first- and second-order generalization in the context of nominal-category l...
Article
This study investigated how young children's increasingly flexible use of spatial reference frames enables accurate search for hidden objects by using a task that 3-year-olds have been shown to perform with great accuracy and 2-year-olds have been shown to perform inaccurately. Children watched as an object was rolled down a ramp, behind a panel of...
Article
Though we agree with their argument that language is shaped by domain-general learning processes, Christiansen & Chater (C&C) neglect to detail how the development of these processes shapes language change. We discuss a number of examples that show how developmental processes at multiple levels and timescales are critical to understanding the origi...
Article
Recent research has shown that 2-year-olds fail at a task that ostensibly only requires the ability to understand that solid objects cannot pass through other solid objects. Two experiments were conducted in which 2- and 3-year-olds judged the stopping point of an object as it moved at varying speeds along a path and behind an occluder, stopping at...
Article
Full-text available
The debate on perceptual versus conceptual accounts of children's categorization is still very much at the forefront of recent work in early noun generalization. We examined the integration of perceptual and conceptual information in two experiments with 3-and 4-year-old children that use naming tasks previously claimed by Bloom and Markson (1998)...
Article
Full-text available
We investigate experimentally how children's increasingly flexible use of reference frames enables accurate search for hidden objects. Children watch as an object is rolled down a ramp, behind a panel of doors, and stops at a barrier visible above the doors. Prior studies have found that 3-year-olds can accurately retrieve the object but that 2-yea...
Article
Full-text available
Researchers have proposed that learning names of individual words and categories leads an individual child to develop a general word learning bias. However, evidence to date comes from studies of group means rather than individuals. The current study tests the prediction that the statistics of an individual child's vocabulary are closely related to...

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