Lyle Dennis Vorsatz

Lyle Dennis Vorsatz
The University of Hong Kong | HKU · Department of Biology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

10
Publications
1,314
Reads
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34
Citations
Introduction
Currently working on larval biology and physiology, focusing on community compositions in threatened ecosystems, as well as climate change impacts on their larval physiology. Macro- and microplastic accumulation and its effects on mangrove biota and biogeochemistry.
Additional affiliations
January 2010 - November 2016
University of the Western Cape
Position
  • Master's Student
Education
March 2017 - November 2019
January 2015 - November 2016
University of the Western Cape
Field of study
  • Marine Biology
January 2014 - November 2014
University of the Western Cape
Field of study
  • Marine Biology

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Macroinvertebrates that rely on a supply of planktonic larvae for recruitment play a significant role in maintaining productivity in mangrove ecosystems. Thus, identifying the spatial distribution and physiological limitations of invertebrate larval communities within mangroves is important for targeted conservation efforts to maintain population p...
Article
Full-text available
Global temperature increases are predicted to have pronounced negative effects on the metabolic performance of both terrestrial and aquatic organisms. These metabolic effects may be even more pronounced in intertidal organisms that are subject to multiple, abruptly changing abiotic stressors in the land-sea transition zone. Of the available studies...
Article
Plastic ingestion has been widely investigated to understand its adverse harms on fauna, but the role of fauna itself in plastic fragmentation has been rarely addressed. Here, we review and discuss the available experimental results on the role of terrestrial and aquatic macrofauna in plastic biofragmentation and degradation. Recent studies have sh...
Article
The hotspots for mangrove diversity and plastic emissions from rivers overlap in Asia, however very few studies have investigated anthropogenic marine debris (AMD) pollution in these threatened coastal ecosystems. Despite Hong Kong's position at the mouth of the Pearl River, a major source of mismanaged waste in Asia, the mangroves in Hong Kong hav...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the life‐stage specific vulnerability of ectotherms to temperature increases is crucial to accurately predicting the consequences of current and future global climate change. Here, we examined ontogeny‐specific thermal vulnerability of three intertidal, bimodal (i.e., air and water) breathing crabs from tropical and warm temperate lat...
Article
Full-text available
Most marine ectotherms require the successful completion of a biphasic larval stage to recruit into adult populations. Recruitment of larvae into benthic habitats largely depends on biological interactions and favourable environmental conditions such as the inescapable diurnal thermal and tidal exposures. Hence, assessing how different taxa metabol...
Article
Mangroves are regarded as important spawning and settlement grounds as well as nurseries for larvae and juvenile fishes and invertebrates due to the sheltered nature of these ecosystems. The present study examined the spatial and temporal distribution of fish and invertebrate larvae, simultaneously among several microhabitats, within two South Afri...
Article
Full-text available
The structural complexity of mangrove root systems provides multifunctional ecological habitats that enhance ecosystem processes and ensure the provision of services. To date, the ecological implications and roles of these microstructures at fine scales are overlooked. Here, the complexity among the root systems of three mangrove tree species; Rhiz...
Article
Full-text available
The basic biology and ecology of the South African east coast round herring Etrumeus wongratanai was investigated from samples of fish collected between 2013 and 2016. This species is short‐lived and reaches a maximum of 3 years of age, with rapid growth in its first year of life. It reproduces from June to December (austral summer) and condition f...
Article
Full-text available
Stomach content analyses and measurements of gillraker morphology were used to assess the diet and feeding ecology of the East Coast redeye round herring Etrumeus wongratanai and provide data for comparisons with other small pelagic fishes off South Africa. Samples were collected by jigging from a kayak off Scottburgh, KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), over the...

Questions

Questions (3)
Question
Sampled from a mangrove estuary in South Africa
Question
Hi can anyone identify this crab megalopa? caught using light traps in a mangrove on the east coast of South Africa.
Question
Hi
is this the caridean prawn Palaemon pacificus larvae or a paguroid anomuran zooae?
Also, what is the diagnostic feature to seperate them?
The attached photo is of a specimen caught in a light trap in the Umlalazi mangroves in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Microhabitats created by mangrove root systems, burrowing taxa, seagrass beds and tidal creeks all appear to play a critical role in the young life history stages of fish and invertebrates. Globally, and in South Africa, numerous studies have focused on faunal assemblages within these microhabitats, and have mainly been conducted on juvenile fish species. However, comprehensive studies on both fish and invertebrate larvae are lacking. The overall aim of the project is therefore to examine and characterise the role these microhabitats play in the earliest life history stages of invertebrate and marine species occurring in the southernmost geographical limit of mangrove distribution (Eastern Cape, South Africa). The specific aims of the project is to, firstly environmentally characterise such microhabitats where fish and invertebrate larvae are found. Secondly, the project looks to assess the spatio-temporal role microhabitats have on larvae that inhabit them. Thirdly, the project will examine the organismal response of selected key species to evaluate the physiological fitness in relation to those microhabitats. Lastly, the larval assemblages will be compared across microhabitats within the mangrove system.