Lydia McLean

Lydia McLean
University of Canterbury | UC · School of Biological Sciences

About

2
Publications
182
Reads
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10
Citations
Citations since 2016
2 Research Items
10 Citations
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Introduction
I am currently a PhD student at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. My research surrounds the conservation of New Zealand's mountain parrot, the kea (Nestor notabilis). I conduct behavioural tests alongside stable isotope analysis of kea tissues to understand how diet and behaviour are associated with mortality risk during pest control operations.

Publications

Publications (2)
Article
Full-text available
New Zealand pest control operations commonly deploy toxic sodium fluoroacetate (1080) baits to control introduced mammalian predators and protect vulnerable native fauna, yet the highly intelligent kea (Nestor notabilis) is at risk of mortality following ingestion of toxic baits intended for their protection. We tested the retention of conditioned...
Article
It is useful to gauge the relative importance of different values that are placed on Antarctica, in order to advance the communication of Antarctic science as well as to facilitate decisions regarding the management of human activity, in particular surrounding climate change. This study investigates the values ascribed to Antarctica by its research...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I am preparing feather samples for stable isotope analysis and as part of the cleaning regime they must be soaked in 2:1 chloroform:methanol solution for 24h to remove oils and surface contaminants. Some of the feathers were unintentionally placed in plastic falcon tubes instead of glass, and the tubes have become slightly misshapen.
Will the feather samples now be contaminated by the plastic? Is it possible to re-soak them in fresh solution to remove any residue, or should I discard these samples?
Thanks for your advice.

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