Lydia Krabbendam

Lydia Krabbendam
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam | VU · Department of Educational Neuropsychology

About

330
Publications
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Publications

Publications (330)
Article
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Academic motivation represents a psychoeducational construct that is associated with the academic success of youth. For some immigrant youth, however, their academic motivation may be affected by the various challenges that they face during their settlement in a culturally diverse school that promotes different self-construal values and practices....
Article
Full-text available
Individuals with autism increasingly enroll in universities, but researchers know little about how their study progresses over time towards degree completion. This exploratory population study uses structural equation modeling to examine patterns in study progression and degree completion of bachelor’s students with autism spectrum disorder ( n = 1...
Article
During adolescence, major changes in brain mechanisms take place and differentiated representations of both the self and of others are developed. Although studies have investigated the neural mechanisms of self- and other-referential processing in adolescents, the development of these mechanisms remain largely unaddressed. Here, we report a three-y...
Article
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Previous research showed mixed evidence on how violent video game exposure (VVGE) may affect empathy for pain in the brain. This study applied an event-related potentials (ERPs) approach to improve understanding of how habitual and short-term violent gameplay may affect empathy for pain brain responses. Fifty-eight male participants with different...
Article
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Developmental changes during adolescence may make youth susceptible to violent media effects. Two studies with male adolescents (N1 = 241; N2 = 161; aged 12–17) examined how habitual and short-term violent video gaming may affect emotion recognition and inhibitory control. We found that not habitual exposure to violent video games, but to antisocia...
Article
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Objectives: Social contact is known to be beneficial for humans’ mental health. Individuals with psychotic symptoms (PS) tend to show poorer social and interpersonal functioning. However, in this patient population, social contact may be crucial for their mental wellbeing and treatment success. Additionally, closeness of social contact (familiar ve...
Article
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Although good quality housing and a socially cohesive neighborhood are associated with a higher well-being in the general population, housing is a rarely studied topic in autism research. In the present study, we describe the housing situation of a large sample of adults with autism and mostly (above) average intellectual abilities (n = 1429; 17 to...
Chapter
Trust is essential for establishing and maintaining cooperative behaviors between individuals and institutions in a wide variety of social, economic, and political contexts. This book explores trust through the lens of neurobiology, focusing on empirical, methodological, and theoretical aspects. Written by a distinguished group of researchers from...
Article
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Nature is considered to have restorative qualities that can potentially improve psychotherapy success. However, little is known about how clients experience nature during psychotherapy. The research aim of this phenomenological qualitative study was to study how clients experience nature during individual outpatient psychotherapy that took place wh...
Article
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In order to think and talk about time, people often use the ego- or time-moving representation. In the ego-moving representation, the self travels through a temporal landscape, leaving past events behind and approaching future events; in the time-moving representation, the self is stationary and temporal events pass by. Several studies contest to t...
Article
Objectives: Psychosis is characterized by paranoid delusions, social withdrawal, and distrust towards others. Trust is essential for successful social interactions. It remains unknown which aspects of social functioning are associated with reduced trust in psychosis. Therefore, we investigated the association between social behaviour, trust, and i...
Article
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Viewing nature has restorative qualities that might help people cope with their personal struggles. Three lab experiments (N = 506) studied whether environment (nature vs. built) influences cognitive coping with psychological distress. Psychological distress was induced with an autobiographical recall task about serious regret, whereafter participa...
Article
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Past research has linked honor to a higher tendency for retaliation. A common method is to compare groups that are either low or high in honor. While effective, this does not account for within-group variation, nor isolate honor as a distinct construct from alternative differences between groups that might affect the outcome. In the current study w...
Preprint
Early adolescence may be an important period for developing sensitivity to uncooperative behavior. With this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we examined longitudinal changes in trusting behavior and their neural correlates in regions of interest (ROIs) selected a priori: the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), dorsal anterior cingulate co...
Article
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Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) and schizophrenia spectrum conditions (SSC) are both characterized by changes in social-cognitive functioning. Less is known about the overlap and the differences in social-cognitive functioning when comparing individuals with subclinical levels of ASC and SSC, while studies in non-clinical samples have the benefit...
Article
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Introduction Social feedback can influence cognitive control during adolescence, particularly if provided by peers. The main aim of this study was to investigate if feedback given by liked or disliked peers differentially influenced adolescents' cognitive control. The second aim was to investigate if these effects could be linked to the participant...
Article
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Mentalizing is an important aspect of social cognition and people vary in their ability to mentalize. Despite initial evidence that mentalizing continues to develop throughout adolescence, it is unclear which neural mechanisms underlie individual variability in mentalizing ability in adolescents. Interactions within and between the default-mode net...
Chapter
Epidemiological studies suggest that the observed association between urbanicity and psychosis may be explained in part by social deprivation, reduced social capital affecting cohesion and trust, and minority group and ethnic density effects, which in turn may represent aspects of “social defeat.” In addition, urbanicity is also associated with pol...
Article
Important adolescents’ career-related decisions might be influenced by their beliefs about malleability of intelligence and learning (mindset). We combined quantitative and qualitative data to provide in-depth insights in the beliefs that 13- and 14-year olds hold about learning and intelligence, the factors influencing these beliefs, and the conse...
Article
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Early‐onset psychosis disorders are serious mental disorders arising before the age of 18 years. Here, we investigate the largest neuroimaging dataset, to date, of patients with early‐onset psychosis and healthy controls for differences in intracranial and subcortical brain volumes. The sample included 263 patients with early‐onset psychosis (mean...
Article
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Peer preference among classmates is a highly influential factor in children’s social development and not being preferred by peers has long-term consequences for children’s developmental outcomes. However, little is known about how a history of low peer preference during primary school is associated with neural responses to a new social exclusion ex...
Article
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Previous research suggests that individuals from individualistic and collectivistic cultures, due to different construal of the self and social groups, might have different emotional experiences and attenuate their emotional experiences differently across situations. The current research investigates the influence of these cultural orientations spe...
Article
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Background: Autistic individuals' enrollment in universities is increasing, but we know little about their study progress over time. Many of them have poor degree completion in comparison to students with other disabilities. However, longitudinal studies on study progression over time of autistic students (AS) in comparison to their peers are absen...
Article
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During adolescence, self-concept develops profoundly, accompanied by major changes in hormone levels. Self-evaluations become more complex, and peers and their opinions increasingly salient. Neuroimaging studies have investigated self- and other-related processing in adolescents, however, the influence of similarity of peers on these processes is s...
Article
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Background Psychosis is associated with profound problems in interpersonal functioning. One of the key elements of social relationships is trust. Previous research has shown that patients with psychotic disorders display reduced trust in others. Reduced trust may lead to paranoid ideation and (as a consequence) to social withdrawal. Patients with p...
Preprint
Being able to adapt one’s trust behavior is essential for social relationships. In the current fMRI study, we first examined adolescents’ ability to adapt trust behavior and the neural mechanisms of trust. Second, we examined developmental differences by comparing young and late adolescents. Third, we examined how positions in a friendship network,...
Preprint
Assessing the trustworthiness of others to learn who you can and cannot trust is important for social relationships. During early adolescence, the social environment becomes increasingly complex. The number and nature of one’s friendships may help to shape, and may be facilitated by, adequate trust behavior. In the current fMRI study, we investigat...
Article
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This study examined the sex-specific developmental trajectories of sharing behavior in the Dictator Game with an anonymous other, best friend, and disliked peer and associations with peer likeability and peer dislikeability in 1,108 children (50.5% boys) followed annually across grades 2–6 (ages 8–12) of elementary school. Results showed that shari...
Article
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Building knowledge schemas that organize information and guide future learning is of great importance in everyday life. Such knowledge building is suggested to occur through reinstatement of prior knowledge during new learning, yielding integration of new with old memories supported by the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and medial temporal lobe (M...
Article
Twenty-first century urbanization poses increasing challenges for mental health. Epidemiological studies have shown that mental health problems often accumulate in urban areas, compared to rural areas, and suggested possible underlying causes associated with the social and physical urban environments. Emerging work indicates complex urban effects t...
Article
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The number of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) entering Universities is growing. Recent studies show an increased understanding of students with ASD in higher education. Yet, current research generally relies on small samples, lacks information about student characteristics prior to enrollment, and does not compare students with ASD to...
Article
Patients with a disorder in the schizophrenia spectrum (SZ) demonstrate impairments in reward learning. A reduced sensitivity to social reward may impede social beyond non-social reward learning mechanisms. The aim of the current study was to investigate social and non-social reward learning in SZ by means of two interactive game-theoretical invest...
Preprint
Collectivistic orientation, which entails interdependent self-construal and concern for interpersonal harmony and social adjustment, has been suggested to be associated with detecting emotional expressions that signal social threat than individualistic orientation, which entails independent self-construal. The present research tested if this detect...
Preprint
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How efficiently one can take the perspective of another might be influenced by individualism (I) and collectivism (C), characterized by whether the self is construed as independent or interdependent. Collectivism can be associated with more accurate and faster inference of others’ mental states because of heightened attention to others’ perspective...
Article
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In chronic psychosis, reduced trust is associated with a neural insensitivity to social reward and reduced theory of mind (ToM). Here we investigate whether these mechanisms could underlie emerging social impairments in early psychosis. Twenty-two participants with early psychosis and 25 controls (male, 13-19 years) participated in two interactive...
Article
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Research from cultural and social psychology has identified a central role of self-construal, or the way one views themselves in relation to others, in social cognition. Accordingly, it is plausible that self-construal plays an instrumental role in important aspects of decision-making relating to fairness considerations. Prior research has shown th...
Article
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Objective Elevated prevalence of non-affective psychotic disorders is often found in densely populated areas. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigates if reduced trust, a component of impaired social functioning in patients with psychotic disorder, is associated with urban upbringing. Methods In total, 39 patients (22 first ep...
Preprint
Full-text available
Building consistent knowledge schemas that organize information and guide future learning is of great importance in everyday life. Such knowledge building is suggested to occur through reinstatement of prior knowledge during new learning in stimulus-specific brain regions. This process is proposed to yield integration of new with old memories, supp...
Article
Full-text available
Background Trust and reciprocity toward others have often been found to increase from childhood to adulthood. Gender differences in these social behaviors have been reported in adults. While adolescence is a key-period of change in social behavior, gender differences in trust and reciprocity during this developmental stage have rarely been investig...
Article
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Background: Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share genetic liability, and some structural brain abnormalities are common to both conditions. First-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia (FDRs-SZ) show similar brain abnormalities to patients, albeit with smaller effect sizes. Imaging findings in first-degree relatives of patients with bi...
Article
Full-text available
Peer preference among classmates is a highly influential factor in children’s social development and not being preferred by peers has long-term consequences for children’s developmental outcomes. However, little is known about how a history of low peer preference during primary school is associated with neural responses to a new social exclusion ex...
Article
Background In chronic psychosis, the loss of trust towards others is associated with a neural insensitivity to social reward and reduced theory of mind (ToM). The aim of this study was to investigate whether these mechanisms are already present in early psychosis. Methods Twenty-two participants with early psychosis and 25 controls (male, 13–19 ye...
Article
Background Elevated incidence rates of non-affective psychosis and psychotic symptoms in densely populated urban areas have been reported by many epidemiological studies. It has been proposed that social characteristics of the urban environment underlie the association with the development of psychotic disorders. Individuals at risk for psychosis m...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past decade, important insights have been obtained into the neurocognitive development during adolescence. To better understand how these neuroscientific insights impact the real world, we investigated how neuroscience has shaped public perceptions of the “teenage brain” and if these perceptions influence adolescent behavior. When asking t...
Article
Understanding how bicultural and monocultural individuals are oriented toward the cultures they come into frequent contact with can increase insights into their adaptation and well-being. Previous research has shown a relation between culture and mental state reading in the form of the cultural in-group effect, which is defined as the advantage in...
Article
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Purpose of review: Epidemiological studies associate city living with an elevated psychosis risk. Urban (social/economic) stress and exposure to environmental toxins, pollution or disease agents have been proposed to underlie this association. This review provides an update on the recent evidence (May 2017 - November 2018). Recent findings: Of 6...
Article
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Background: Psychosis is characterized by problems in social functioning and trust, the assumed glue to positive social relations. But what helps building trust? A prime candidate could be social mindfulness: the ability and willingness to see and consider another person’s needs and wishes during social decision making. We investigated whether firs...
Article
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Modern neuroscience research, including neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), has provided valuable insights that advanced our understanding of brain development and learning processes significantly. However, there is a lively discussion about whether and how these insights can be meaningful to the educationa...
Article
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In everyday life and in education, we continuously build and structure our knowledge. Successful knowledge construction is suggested to happen through reactivation of previously learned information during new learning. This reactivation is presumed to lead to integration of old and new memories and strengthen long-term retention. Additionally, cong...
Article
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Adolescents’ defending of peers who are being bullied—or peer defending—was recently found to be a heterogeneous behavioral construct. The present study investigated individual differences in adolescents’ motivations for executing these indirect, direct, and hybrid defending behaviors. In line with the literature on bullying as goal‐directed strate...
Data
Table S1. Correlations between all study variables for children in cohort 1, separately for boys and girls. Table S2. Correlations between all study variables for children in cohort 2, separately for boys and girls. Table S3. Correlations between all study variables for children in cohort 3, separately for boys and girls.
Article
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Background The impact of childhood antisocial behaviour on future maladaptation has been acknowledged. Risk‐taking has been associated with antisocial behaviour in adolescents and adults, but its association with childhood antisocial behaviour is understudied. In this study, we explored the association of children's risk‐taking with antisocial beha...
Article
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Prior research has shown an elevation in autism traits and diagnoses in individuals seen for gender related consultation and in participants self-identifying as transgender. To investigate this relationship between autism and gender identity from a new angle, we compared the self-reported autism traits and sensory differences between participants w...
Article
Background Psychosis is characterized by problems in social functioning that exist well before illness onset, and in individuals at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis. Trust is an essential element for social interactions that is impaired in psychosis. In the trust game, chronic patients showed reduced baseline trust, impaired response to posit...
Article
Full-text available
Adolescence is a period characterised by increases in risk-taking. This behaviour has been associated with an imbalance in the integration of the networks involved in cognitive control and motivational processes. We examined whether the influence of emotional cues on cognitive control differs between adolescents who show high or low levels of risk-...
Article
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Cognitive biases, negative affect and negative self-esteem are associated with paranoia in people with psychotic disorders. Metacognitive group training (MCT) aims to target these biases although research has shown mixed results. Our objective was to establish the effect of MCT on paranoid ideation in patients with recent onset psychosis in a power...
Article
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Successful social relationships require a consideration of a partner's thoughts and intentions. This aspect of social life is captured in the social mindfulness paradigm (SoMi task), in which participants make decisions that either limit or preserve options for their interaction partner's subsequent choice. Here we investigated the neural correlate...
Article
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The pedagogical beliefs (e.g., beliefs or “mindsets” concerning the malleability of intelligence) that teachers hold may have a far-reaching impact on their teaching behavior. In general, two basic mindsets can be distinguished with regard to the malleability of intelligence: fixed (entity) and growth (incremental). In this article, we present two...
Article
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This study investigated whether individualism and collectivism (IC) at country, individual, and situational level influence how quickly and accurately people can infer mental states (i.e. theory of mind, or ToM), indexed by accuracy and reaction time in a ToM task. We hypothesized that collectivism (having an interdependent self and valuing group c...