Luz Boyero

Luz Boyero
Universidad del País Vasco / Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea | UPV/EHU · Plant Biology and Ecology, Stream Ecology Lab

PhD

About

177
Publications
57,820
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4,447
Citations
Citations since 2016
105 Research Items
3030 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220200400600
20162017201820192020202120220200400600

Publications

Publications (177)
Article
Amphibians are declining worldwide due to a combination of stressors such as climate change, invasive species, habitat loss, pollution and emergent diseases. Although their losses are likely to have important ecological consequences on the structure and functioning of freshwater ecosystems, this issue has been scarcely explored. We conducted an exp...
Article
Riparian forests play an important role in stream ecosystems, as they support biodiversity, reduce water erosion, and provide litter that fuels aquatic biota. However, they are affected by great array of anthropogenic threats (e.g., fire, logging, and organic pollution), which alter species composition and their physical structure. Although forest...
Article
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Alder (Alnus glutinosa) and oak (Quercus robur) are dominant tree species in European Atlantic mixed forests, and their leaf litter is a key resource for stream ecosystems. While alder litter has higher nutrient content and palatability than other species and is rapidly processed in the stream by detritivores and microorganisms, oak litter is a tou...
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Aim Leaf litter inputs from riparian vegetation and its decomposition play a key role in energy and nutrient transfer in many stream ecosystems. Instream leaf litter decomposition is driven by both leaf traits and environmental conditions. Therefore, understanding and predicting leaf trait variation under current environmental changes and their put...
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Microbes play a critical role in plant litter decomposition and influence the fate of carbon in rivers and riparian zones. When decomposing low‐nutrient plant litter, microbes acquire nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from the environment (i.e., nutrient immobilization), and this process is potentially sensitive to nutrient loading and changing clima...
Data
This document includes: Supporting Methods, a glossary, seven tables (Tables S1-S7) and three figures (Figures S1-S3)
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Biodiversity loss is altering key ecosystem processes as primary production and decomposition, however, the after-life effects of plant diversity (species-mixing effects) on instream organic matter (litter) decomposition is still under debate. Available evidence of litter species-mixing effect (or the lack of) comes from studies using dominant plan...
Article
Microplastics (MPs) have been recognized as as one of the most ubiquitous environmental pollutants globally. They have been found in all ecosystems studied to date, threatening biological diversity, ecosystem functioning and human health. The present study aimed to elucidate the environmental and anthropogenic drivers of MP dynamics in the whole ca...
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The tiger crab Aegla concepcionensis Schmitt, 1942 (Decapoda, Aeglidae) is a threatened freshwater decapod, endemic of Chile, with significant gaps in knowledge about its biology and ecology. The aim of this work was to contribute to the knowledge of the ecology of A. concepcionensis, through the extension of its known distribution range, recorded...
Article
Biodiversity loss is known to affect the two fundamental and opposite processes controlling carbon and nutrient cycles globally, that is, primary production and decomposition, which are driven by green and brown food web compartments, respectively. However, biodiversity in these two food web compartments has been mostly studied independently, and p...
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Leaf litter decomposition is a key process in stream ecosystems, the rates of which can vary with changes in litter quality or its colonization by microorganisms. Decomposition in streams is increasingly used to compare ecosystem functioning globally, often requiring the distribution of litter across countries. It is important to understand whether...
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Microplastics (MPs), a new class of pollutants that pose a threat to aquatic biodiversity, are of increasing global concern. In tandem, the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) causing the disease chytridiomycosis is emerging worldwide as a major stressor to amphibians. We here assess whether synergies exist between this inf...
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Litter decomposition is an ecological process of key importance for forest headwater stream functioning, with repercussions for the global carbon cycle. The process is directly and indirectly mediated by microbial decomposers, mostly aquatic hyphomycetes, and influenced by environmental and biological factors such as water temperature and litter qu...
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Leaf litter of alder (Alnus glutinosa) is a key resource to detrital stream food webs. Due to its high quality and palatability, it is readily colonised by microorganisms and consumed by detritivores, contributing significantly to carbon and nutrient cycling and to ecosystem functioning. Given that this species has declined due to the spread of the...
Chapter
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Understanding ecological patterns and processes at the global scale is becoming increasingly important in view of the rapid pace of environmental change and consequent impacts on ecosystems. This chapter reviews current knowledge about how plant litter decomposition—a key stream ecosystem process—and its major biotic and abiotic drivers vary global...
Chapter
Terrestrial litter that decomposes in streams is critical to carbon and nutrient fluxes and aquatic food web dynamics. Litter dynamics is influenced by biogeochemical, morphological, environmental and climatic factors, making it challenging to understand how these factors relate to each other and to litter decomposition across different spatial sca...
Chapter
A key or keystone species is defined as a species with disproportionately large effects on the ecosystem relative to its abundance. In freshwater ecology it is often used with a bottom-up perspective, to refer to riparian plant species whose litter resources are of particular importance for invertebrate communities and ecosystem processes. This inc...
Chapter
The decomposition of plant litter of terrestrial origin is a key process for the functioning of many stream ecosystems with notable relevance for global biogeochemical cycles. The process has received much attention in the literature but, since the iconic paper of Kaushik and Hynes (1971), we lack a comprehensive review of its patterns of variation...
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Anthropogenic impacts on freshwater ecosystems cause critical losses of biodiversity that can in turn impair key processes such as decomposition and nutrient cycling. Forest streams are mainly subsidized by terrestrial organic detritus, so their functioning and conservation status can be altered by changes in forest biodiversity and composition, pa...
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The relationship between detritivore diversity and decomposition can provide information on how biogeochemical cycles are affected by ongoing rates of extinction, but such evidence has come mostly from local studies and microcosm experiments. We conducted a globally distributed experiment (38 streams across 23 countries in 6 continents) using stand...
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Several studies have examined the transmission dynamics of the novel COVID-19 disease in different parts of the world. Some have reported relationships with various environmental variables, suggesting that spread of the disease is enhanced in colder and drier climates. However, evidence is still scarce and mostly limited to a few countries, particu...
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Freshwater organisms are often sensitive to pesticides, but their sensitivity varies across different taxa and with pesticide type and action mode, as shown by multiple acute toxicity tests. Such variability hampers predictions about how freshwater ecosystems may be altered by pesticide toxicity, which is especially critical for under-studied areas...
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Understanding which factors affect the process of leaf litter decomposition is crucial if we are to predict changes in the functioning of stream ecosystems as a result of human activities. One major activity with known consequences on streams is agriculture, which is of particular concern in tropical regions, where forests are being rapidly replace...
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Running waters contribute substantially to global carbon fluxes through decomposition of terrestrial plant litter by aquatic microorganisms and detritivores. Diversity of this litter may influence instream decomposition globally in ways that are not yet understood. We investigated latitudinal differences in decomposition of litter mixtures of low a...
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Running waters contribute substantially to global carbon fluxes through decomposition of terrestrial plant litter by aquatic microorganisms and detritivores. Diversity of this litter may influence instream decomposition globally in ways that are not yet understood. We investigated latitudinal differences in decomposition of litter mixtures of low a...
Article
Forest wetlands are biodiversity hotspots that perform functions of vital ecological importance, but they are among the world's most threatened ecosystems. Due to their high diversity of habitats and species, the study of their benthic macroinvertebrate communities is challenging, and there is no consensus on which sampling methods allow a better r...
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Extreme temperature events have increased in intensity, duration and frequency in the last century, with potential consequences on organisms and ecosystems. In many streams, leaf litter of terrestrial origin is a key resource for microorganisms and some detritivores, and its decomposition has a main role on ecosystem functioning and is often used a...
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Plant biodiversity loss in riparian forests is known to alter key stream ecosystem processes such as leaf litter decomposition. One potential mechanism mediating this biodiversity–decomposition relationship is the increased variability of plant functional traits at higher levels of biodiversity, providing more varied resources for decomposers and t...
Book
With almost 90% of terrestrial plant material entering the detrital pool, the processing of this significant carbon source is a critical ecosystem function to understand. Riverine ecosystems are estimated to receive, process and transport nearly 1.9 Pg of terrestrial carbon per year globally, highlighting the focus many freshwater ecologists have o...
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Abstract Plant litter decomposition is a key ecosystem process that can be altered by global changes such as biodiversity loss. These effects can be particularly important in detritus-based ecosystems, such as headwater streams, which are mainly fuelled by allochthonous plant litter inputs. However, experiments examining effects of plant diversity...
Chapter
Many stream invertebrates consume substantial amounts of plant litter at some time during their life cycle and thus play a key role in plant litter decomposition. These litter-consuming invertebrates include mainly shredders, a functional feeding group defined by their ability to shred litter, but also some scrapers, leaf miners, wood borers, and g...
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The expansion of agriculture is particularly worrying in tropical regions of the world, where native forests are being replaced by crops at alarming rates, with severe consequences for biodiversity and ecosystems. However, there is little information about the potential effects of agriculture on the functioning of tropical streams, which is essenti...
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Fungicides can reach streams through runoff or adhered to leaf litter, and have the potential to adversely affect processes such as litter decomposition and associated communities. This study investigated the effects of chlorothalonil, a widely used fungicide, on litter decomposition, detritivorous invertebrates (larvae of the insect Sericostoma py...
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Salmon fish farms utilize 20–30 t yr-1 salt (NaCl) to prevent and control fungal infections; increasing salinity has potentially adverse effects on freshwater biodiversity and ecosystem functions and services. We studied the effects of fish-farm effluents on benthic macroinvertebrate communities in a northern Patagonian stream (Chile), where the aq...
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The marine ecosystem of the Chilean Patagonia is considered structurally and functionally unique, because it is the transition area between the Antarctic climate and the more temperate Pacific region. However, due to its remoteness, there is little information about Patagonian marine biodiversity, which is a problem in the face of the increasing an...
Article
Microplastics (MPs) are contaminants of increasing concern due to their abundance, ubiquity and persistence over time. However, knowledge about MP distribution in fresh waters and their effects on freshwater organisms is still scarce, and there is virtually no information about their potential influence on ecosystem functioning. We used a microcosm...
Article
Extreme temperatures have increased in intensity, duration and frequency in the last century, with potential consequences on key ecological processes such as organic matter breakdown. Many stream ecosystems are fueled by the breakdown of terrestrial leaf litter, which is exposed to atmospheric conditions for certain periods of time before entering...
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Full-text available
Flexible management of exploited invasive species is needed when population control is unfeasible to avoid societal opposition and legal setbacks. Conservation conflicts arise frequently in the management of non-native invasive species (NIS) when such species provide socioeconomic benefits and have negative environmental impacts (van Wilgen & Rich...
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Amphibian larvae are known to display defensive behavior in response to water borne chemical cues from aquatic predators that they recognize as a threat, either innately or via learning. Such potential for adaptive behavioral plasticity may increase population resilience in montane habitats, where many unique amphibian assemblages have suffered fro...
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An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
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Streams draining forested landscapes are fuelled by terrestrial plant litter, which can be transported downstream or retained and broken down locally. However, fluxes of plant litter in streams can vary at multiple spatio‐temporal scales, affecting the availability of this key resource in heterotrophic stream food webs. To explore this question we...
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Emerging infectious diseases are increasingly recognized as a severe threat to wildlife. Chytridiomycosis, caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is considered one of the most important causes for the decline of amphibian populations worldwide. Identifying potential biological reservoirs and characterizing the role they can play in pathogen...
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Full-text available
Tropical forests are declining at unprecedented rates in favour of agriculture, and streams can be severely impacted due to effects of multiple stressors that have rarely been considered together in tropical studies. We studied the effects of multiple stressors associated with agricultural practices (pesticide toxicity, nutrient enrichment and habi...
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Full-text available
Biodiversity loss is occurring globally at unprecedented rates, altering the functioning of the Earth's ecosystems. Multiple processes are often key components of ecosystem functioning, but it is unclear how biodiversity loss affects ecosystem multifunctionality (i.e., the ability of ecosystems to maintain multiple processes simultaneously). This i...