Luke Greenacre

Luke Greenacre
Monash University (Australia)

PhD

About

40
Publications
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568
Citations

Publications

Publications (40)
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates the relationship between distribution and market share across various consumer packaged goods (CPG) categories and specific stock keeping units (SKUs). The study identifies product-related characteristics that result in substantive deviations above or below market shares predicted by the distribution – market share relations...
Article
Full-text available
This research presents a retail analytics application which uses machine learning (ML) to identify and predict under- and overperforming consumer packaged goods (CPGs) using retail scanner data. Essential to measuring market performance at the SKU level is the relationship between distribution and market share (the velocity curve). We validate that...
Article
A new form of conditional welfare through income management is being trialled in Australia, dubbed the “Cashless Debit Card”. It aims to reduce gambling, alcohol and illegal drug use to address social pathologies related to crime and welfare. Routinely collected data from government were used to assess if the targeted reductions arose. Store sales...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The effectiveness of healthy food promotion on food and beverage sales in real-world food retail settings has been shown in randomised trials. The effectiveness of restrictions on the promotion of unhealthy food is, however, less clear. We aimed to assess the effect of restricted unhealthy food promotion, specifically those items contr...
Article
Background How food is promoted in food retail settings impacts population diet. Foods high in sugar, fat and/or salt are promoted by retailers to attract impulse purchases. To combat the high burden of chronic disease and associated conditions confronting society we examined the impact of restricted retail merchandising (promotion and visibility)...
Article
Purpose This study aims to independently test the predictive validity of the Persuasion Principles Index (PPI) for video advertisements for low-involvement products with a measure of in-market sales effectiveness. This study follows the inaugural test conducted by Armstrong et al. (2016) for print advertisements for high-involvement utilitarian pro...
Article
Purpose It is well known that certain payment methods, such as credit and debit cards, can increase consumer spending. For many low income consumers, who cannot typically increase their spend, the relationship between payment method and spending has not been empirically examined. Using grocery store sales data, this research takes advantage of the...
Preprint
BACKGROUND Discretionary food and beverages (products high in high in saturated fat, added sugars and salt) are detrimental to a healthy diet. Nevertheless, they provide 42% of total energy and account for 53% of food and beverage expenditure for remote living Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, contributing to the excessive burden o...
Article
Background: Discretionary food and beverages (products high in saturated fat, added sugars, and salt) are detrimental to a healthy diet. Nevertheless, they provide 42% of total energy and account for 53% of food and beverage expenditure for remote living Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, contributing to the excessive burden of chr...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose This paper examines the impact of purchasing occasion on product value indicators for a selection of Australian and New Zealand branded wines as evaluated by consumers. Value indicators were defined as conspicuous or inconspicuous. Conspicuous indicators include corporate advertising, such as the vineyard, region or brand, and are consider...
Article
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Price elasticity is a widely used measure of consumers’ willingness or ability to pay for goods and services. This research examines the price elasticity of high-priced brands. We define high-priced brands as those that sell at or above the price point at which consumers begin to consider that product to be luxurious or premium in the category (Kap...
Article
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This paper describes the patterns discovered in fruit and vegetable buying behaviour in the United States and India. Using claimed buying data obtained from online questionnaires we compare the patterns against those found extensively in consumer goods categories across the world. This study analyses consumer loyalty with Double Jeopardy, consumer...
Article
Self-reference is a fundamental aspect of the learning process; all students use themselves as a model to understand others and the things around them. In this paper, we consider how self-reference as a learning technique leads students to unconsciously use themselves as a model for target segments in marketing plans. As many business teachers have...
Article
Full-text available
Marketers' intuitions about the sales effectiveness of advertisements Advertisements vary enormously in their sales effectiveness, so choosing the more effective creative executions to air is an important marketing task. Such decisions are often made intuitively. This study assesses the intuitive predictions of a global sample of marketers regardin...
Article
Horizontal centrality bias has been found to influence what products consumers pay attention to and what products they choose to purchase. Such bias offers substantial competitive advantage to brands that know about it and display their products so as to capitalize on it. Atalay et al. (2012) identified the key components of this horizontal central...
Article
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Framing a decision as a rejection can lead consumers to form different preferences than they would if that same decision were framed as a choice. These differences in preferences are called preference reversals. This paper extends research in this area, using a sequence of five studies to show that framing can change both mean preference and prefer...
Article
The assumption in the literature that the transition to tertiary studies occurs within the first year has not been tested. This study investigates the timing of the transition by comparing the experiences of domestic students from rural (n = 7) and urban (n = 8) secondary schools, using an ecological framework. Semi-structured interviews of student...
Conference Paper
Sampling respondents from online sources is now a common research practice. With the increase in internet use across the globe, it is possible to source respondents from multiple countries. This leads to questions concerning the suitability of these samples for cross-national research. Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (MTurk) is a now common source of part...
Article
Full-text available
Traditional country-of-origin strategy in international marketing uses a country-image halo to cue beliefs about the country's products. With expansive trade globalization, domestic consumers are likely to have experience with foreign products but know little of the products' origin country. Thus, equally important as traditional theory is the ques...
Article
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The application of neuroscience methods to analyze and understand preference formation and decision making in marketing tasks has recently gained research attention. The key contribution of this paper is to complement the advancement of traditional consumer research through the investigation of the event-related potentials (ERPs) associated with pr...
Article
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Purpose International brands are expanding their business into emerging markets seeking new consumers for their products. Multiple research studies suggest that there are two key differentiators between developed and emerging markets that managers must take into account. These are that consumers differentiate between local and international brands,...
Article
Advertising creative is widely accepted as critical to advertising success. However, generalizations of what works in applied settings across different conditions are few. The present study replicates the seminal work of Stewart and Furse (1986) who investigated the effect of more than 150 creative devices on several copy-testing measures of advert...
Article
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Double jeopardy is one of the most important empirical patterns of consumer brand purchase behaviour. It asserts that large brands benefit from having more consumers who are also generally more loyal. Traditional methods for detecting double jeopardy patterns in consumer purchasing behaviour rely heavily on the availability of panel data. Although...
Article
Stigmatized ingredients present a problem for manufacturers, as fears surrounding foods limit the range of products the public will accept. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a commonly stigmatized ingredient, despite it being consistently deemed safe for human consumption by experts. This study examined three strategies for correcting the stigmatizatio...
Article
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Best–worst Scaling is one of the dominant measurement approaches in choice experimentation. When employed it provides substantial information on peoples' preferences without making choice tasks prohibitively long. However, one concern with this method is that peoples' selection of a best may not reflect the same preferences as when a worst is selec...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose – The purpose of this article is to use an extended model of self to understand the consumption of music and similar entertainment products. Design/methodology/approach – In-depth interviews using experts within the music field were used to penetrate the private worlds of musical theatre enthusiasts. Multiple qualitative analytic technique...
Article
Purpose Potential students often learn about University offerings through peer communication, in particular, peer Word of Mouth (WOM). Without an ability to predict and influence such WOM, Higher Education managers cannot accommodate it in their marketing strategies. Using a two phase procedure we address this by proposing a method that can be used...
Article
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This paper uses the Economic Market mechanisms and the 4P Marketing Mix as lenses to review the context of UK higher education (HE) and to explore the relationship between the market and marketing disciplines and practice. Four Economic Market mechanisms – autonomy, competition, price and information – are contrasted with the four Ps of marketing:...
Article
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This paper explores how consumers select different peers in their social network when obtaining positive verses negative referrals, and the role of social cues in this selection process. An inductive framework incorporating a mixed method process was employed. Thirty in-depth interviews were used to understand how consumers activate specific peers...
Article
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This article examines whether individuals achieve greater interpersonal influence in peer groups, particularly related to purchasing, when they have greater social self confidence. Literature in this area has only considered the negative effects of low social self confidence on interpersonal influence, neglecting potential positive effects of posit...
Article
This paper compares social network and tribal theory for their fit with the behaviour of real music communities. These theoretical perspectives are attracting considerable attention as researchers and practitioners search for ways to conceptualise, measure, and interact with communities of consumers. The bases for this comparison are how these pers...
Article
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Word-of-Mouth communication is an invaluable source of information for consumers. A comprehensive understanding of the flow of market information through interpersonal networks is therefore of unique theoretical and practical importance. Present Word-of-Mouth research is receiver centric, largely ignoring the role of the information provider as a g...
Article
Choice conjures the idea of a directed selection of a desirable action or object, motivated by internal likes and dislikes, or other such preferences. However, such internal processes are simply the domain of our human physiology. Understanding the physiological processes of decision making across a variety of contexts is a central aim in decision...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Discrete choice experiments have traditionally focused on improving the prediction of static choices that are measured through external reflection and surveys. It is argued that considering the underlying processes of decision making across a variety of contexts may further progress decision research. As a pilot study in this field, this paper expl...
Article
Full-text available
With the increasing prevalence of group work in marketing courses there is a need to consider the impact of students’ social dynamics on both learning and satisfaction outcomes. This article explores one such dynamic at both intra- and intergroup levels. Using data generated from multiple sources, it was identified that students who are actively co...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines a newly created approach to exploring travel motivations, the Travel Career Patterns (TCP) model. Through an analysis of the TCP model, the authors advance travel motivation theory by making three contributions: a refinement of the definition of travel experience; the use and evaluation of essays as a qualitative tool for interp...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines a newly created approach to exploring travel motivations, the Travel Career Patterns (TCP) model. Through an analysis of the TCP model, the authors advance travel motivation theory by making three contributions: a refinement of the definition of travel experience; the use and evaluation of essays as a qualitative tool for interp...