Luke Connolly

Luke Connolly
University of Plymouth | UoP · School of Health Professions

PhD

About

19
Publications
11,583
Reads
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273
Citations

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Background: Perceptual responses (affect, enjoyment and perceived exertion) and exercise performance (running speed) during self-paced continuous running are dependent on environmental setting (treadmill vs overground), but these observations remain unclear during interval exercise. We examined the running speed, affect, enjoyment, and perceived ex...
Preprint
BACKGROUND Understanding and assessing patients’ body movements is essential for physical rehabilitation but is challenging in video-consultations as clinicians are frequently unable to see the whole patient or see the patient performing specific movements. OBJECTIVE The objective of this exploratory study was to assess readily available technolog...
Article
Background Understanding and assessing patients’ body movements is essential for physical rehabilitation but is challenging in video consultations, as clinicians are frequently unable to see the whole patient or observe the patient as they perform specific movements. Objective The objective of this exploratory study was to assess the use of readil...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate whether aerobic training (AT) or resistance training (RT) is most effective in terms of improving lower limb physical function and perceived fatigue in persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). Data sources: Nine databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, PEDro, SPORTdiscus, PsycIN...
Article
Background : The short-term benefits of exercise in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) are well established. To sustain benefits exercise needs to continue long-term. Despite important clinical implications, no systematic reviews have synthesized evidence on adherence and drop-out in MS exercise interventions. Objectives : 1) To summarize reporte...
Article
Full-text available
PurposeThis study tested the hypothesis that a novel, audio-visual-directed, home-based exercise training intervention would be effective at improving cardiometabolic health and mental well-being in inactive premenopausal women.Methods Twenty-four inactive premenopausal women (39 ± 10 years) were randomly assigned to an audio-visual-directed exerci...
Poster
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
We examined the effects of 16 weeks of football training and dietary advice on blood glucose control and health status in 55‐ to 70‐year‐old women and men with prediabetes. Fifty participants with prediabetes (age; 61 ± 6 years, BMI; 29.6 ± 4.7; VO2max 22.3 ± 5.7 mL·min⁻¹·kg⁻¹) were randomized into a football and dietary advice group (F+D; n = 27)...
Article
A diet rich in vegetables is known to provide cardioprotection. However, it is unclear how the consumption of different vegetables might interact to influence vascular health. This study tested the hypothesis that nitrate-rich vegetable consumption would lower systolic blood pressure but that this effect would be abolished when nitrate-rich and thi...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: To compare the effects of self-paced high-intensity interval and continuous cycle training on health markers in premenopausal women. Methods: Forty-five inactive females were randomised to a high-intensity interval training (HIIT; n = 15), continuous training (CT; n = 15) or an inactive control (CON; n = 15) group. HIIT performed 5 × 5...
Article
Full-text available
The health benefits of playing football and the importance of exercise and social contact for healthy ageing are well established, but few older adults in the UK take enough exercise. Football is popular, flexible in format and draws players into engrossing, effortful and social exercise, but the physical demands of play at full speed may make it u...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: We tested the hypothesis that low-volume high-intensity swimming has a larger impact on insulin sensitivity and glucose control than high-volume low-intensity swimming in inactive premenopausal women with mild hypertension. Methods: Sixty-two untrained premenopausal women were randomised to an inactive control (n = 20; CON), a high-inte...
Article
Full-text available
We aimed to study whether short-duration vibration exercise or football sessions of two different durations acutely changed plasma markers of bone turnover and muscle strain. Inactive premenopausal women ( n=56 ) were randomized to complete a single bout of short (FG15) or long duration (FG60) small sided football or low magnitude whole body vibrat...
Article
Full-text available
The hypothesis that the adaptive capacity is higher in human upper- than lower-body skeletal muscle was tested. Furthermore, the hypothesis that more pronounced adaptations in upper-body musculature can be achieved by 'low-volume high-intensity' as compared to 'high-volume low-intensity' exercise training was evaluated. A group of sedentary premeno...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose The present study investigated the effects of 16 weeks of small-volume, small-sided soccer training (soccer group (SG) n = 13) and oscillating whole-body vibration training (vibration group (VG) n = 17) on body composition, aerobic fitness and muscle PCr kinetics in healthy inactive premenopausal women in comparison with an inactive control...
Article
Full-text available
To examine the physical capacity and physiological response to the Yo-Yo Intermittent Endurance level 2 test (IE2) for untrained individuals and trained male soccer players, and to investigate the determinants of intense intermittent exercise performance. Thirty-four healthy untrained males (UTR) and fifteen age-matched trained soccer players (TR)...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I have been using Biorad equipment and my target proteins are CS, PFK and FXYD1.
The contents of the sample buffer (which we have used many times with no problems) are Tris Base, DTT, SDS, Glycerol and Bromphenol blue.
The gel we are using is Bio-Rad Criterion TGX Stain-Free Precast Gel 4-15%.
The transfer buffer we prepare includes Tris-base, glycin, SDS, ethanol and DDH2O (we have used two different batches of this transfer buffer with the same smeared results.
The running phase seems to work normally and the process terminated before the blue dye reaches the bottom of the gel.
As we are working with many samples and running/transferring 5 gels/membranes at one time, we have cut the gels so CS, PFK and FXYD1 samples are on the same membrane when transferred. We use two transfer machines connected to a Bio-Rad PowerPac Basic Power Supply. It should be noted that an error code appears and displays short circuit error and I am awaiting a response from Bio-Rad with troubleshooting this problem.
However, after the transfer, the markers we use (All Blue and Dual Colour) tend to look smeared and once we have finished blocking and adding antibodies, the pictures provided using the Bio-Rad chemidoc look even worse (please find example for PFK attached).
If the sample buffer is made incorrectly (e.g. too much Tris Base used in relation to other contents), how much of an effect could this have on the results?

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Improving cognition in people with Progressive Multiple Sclerosis: A Multi-Arm, Randomized, Blinded, Sham-Controlled Trial of Cognitive Rehabilitation and Aerobic Exercise (CogEx)