Luke Brander

Luke Brander
Brander Environmental Economics

PhD

About

130
Publications
111,575
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Introduction
Luke Brander is an environmental economist with over 20 years experience in applied research. He obtained his Masters degree in Environmental and Resource Economics at University College London (1997-98) and his doctoral degree from the VU University Amsterdam in 2011. Luke works as a freelance researcher based in Amsterdam. His main research interests are in the design of economic instruments to control environmental problems and the valuation of natural capital and ecosystem services.

Publications

Publications (130)
Article
Global climate change is leading to rapid deteriorations of the health and productivity of coral reefs. There is limited research on the associated human welfare implications, particularly in terms of the non-use values that people hold for coral reefs. We examine climate related changes in non-use values of coral health, coral cover, water clarity...
Article
Full-text available
Nature-based solutions (NBS) to climate change and other environmental challenges face a well-documented shortfall in financing and resource allocation. Economic evaluations of NBS that apply stated preference methods increasingly use time contributions instead of the traditionally used monetary contributions, especially in developing countries. Th...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This study provides a global review and summary of the literature on the economic value of marine turtles. It also estimates the value of provisioning services and non-use values provided by marine turtles in the Asia-Pacific — a region characterised by the highest diversity of marine turtles, gravest threats and ongoing population decline.
Article
Full-text available
Developing countries are increasingly impacted by floods, especially in Asia. Traditional flood risk management , using structural measures such as levees, can have negative impacts on the livelihoods of social groups that are more vulnerable. Ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) provides a complementary approach that is potentially more inclusive of g...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The exclusive economic zone of the Cook Islands, nearly 1,960,000 km2 of ocean, is 7,000 times larger than the country’s land area of just 240km2. Coastal and marine resources provide the Government of the Cook Islands, businesses and households with many real and measurable benefits. This report describes, quantifies and, where possible, estimates...
Article
The year 2020 is a critical year for sustainable development policy and practice with the review and renewal of various international commitments including the Sustainable Development Goals, the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Paris Agreement. The post-2020 agenda needs to be informed by more robust analytical approaches that capture the...
Article
Trail running has evolved from a fringe to mainstream activity but is associated with a rise in adverse environmental impacts including trail degradation, littering and disturbance of wildlife. This study explores the preferences of trail running race participants for sustainable use of country parks in Hong Kong. We use a face-to-face survey and d...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Ecosystem Services Valuation Database (ESVD) is a follow-up to the “The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity” (TEEB) database which contained over 1,300 data points from 267 case studies on monetary values of ecosystem services across all biomes. The TEEB database had not been updated since 2010 and naturally many gaps exist across biomes,...
Article
Full-text available
To guide investments in ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) in developing countries, numerous stated preference valuation studies have been implemented to assess the value of ecosystem services. These studies increasingly use time payments as an alternative to money. There is limited knowledge, however, about how to convert time to money and how the t...
Article
Marine ecosystems and the services they provide contribute greatly to human well-being but are becoming degraded in many areas around the world. The expansion of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) has been advanced as a potential solution to this problem but their economic feasibility has hardly been studied. We conduct an economic assessment of the cos...
Article
Full-text available
A broad array of methods have been developed and applied to map ecosystem services and their values at various geographic scales. For example, the ESMERALDA project developed methods for ecosystem service mapping across Europe. This paper describes how different methodological interlinkages can be used in ecosystem service mapping and assessment an...
Article
Full-text available
The water flow regulation ecosystem service can be subdivided into river flood regulation and coastal flood regulation. They are quite different and there are major differences in biophysical processes, scientific disciplines, data, models and methods. • The measurement of river flood regulation relatively is very well studied, whereas coastal floo...
Article
Full-text available
In the context of climate change, small island developing states (SIDS) need to engage in adaptation efforts. Due to the rural, remote and specific institutional characteristics of SIDS, these efforts are commonly implemented at the community level. Therefore, the adaptive capacity of the community is an essential attribute of the adaptation proces...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report provides an inventory of past and on-going public and private incentive and market based mechanisms with relevance for sustainable land management in Cambodia
Technical Report
Full-text available
The purpose of this report is to assess the economic value of the change in the provision of ecosystem services from forests in Cambodia over the period 2010-30 under a continuation of current trends of land use change.
Article
Full-text available
The European Union (EU) Horizon 2020 Coordination and Support Action ESMERALDA aimed at developing guidance and a flexible methodology for Mapping and Assessment of Ecosystems and their Services (MAES) to support the EU member states in the implementation of the EU Biodiversity Strategy’s Target 2 Action 5. ESMERALDA’s key tasks included network cr...
Article
A case study of Adjara Autonomous Republic of Georgia to examine alternative scenarios for forest management and associated land cover change.
Article
Full-text available
Identifying and applying the appropriate method for ecosystem services mapping and assessment is not trivial. To provide guidance in this task, this paper describes the creation of a database for existing studies on mapping and assessing ecosystems and their services, which records relevant information to the ecosystem studies (e.g. methods used, t...
Chapter
Wetlands and the ecosystem services they provide are hugely valuable to people worldwide in many ways: for livelihood, for their biodiversity and existence values and for their economic benefits. Yet many of these services, such as the recharge of groundwater, water purification or cultural values are not immediately obvious when one looks at a wet...
Article
Full-text available
Using islands as a model system, this paper seeks to understand how ecosystem service valuation (ESV) has and can move from a monetized, single-service paradigm to an integrated valuation paradigm, a participatory approach that represents a more diverse set of the values of nature, and beyond, to a more fully realized conception of the island socia...
Article
Full-text available
This paper investigates spatial determinants of recreational ecosystem service values by combining Geographic Information System (GIS) and meta-analysis, and by presenting the first review on meta-analysis studies in this field. Using meta-analytic value transfer, we map the spatial distribution of recreational values across Europe. By combining me...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report provides an overview of the main economic methods for mapping and assessment of ecosystem services.
Article
MPAs enhance some of the Ecosystem Services (ES) provided by coral reefs and clear, robust valuations of these impacts may help to improve stakeholder support and better inform decision-makers. Pursuant to this goal, Cost-Benefit Analyses (CBA) of MPAs in 2 different contexts were analysed: a community based MPA with low tourism pressure in Vanuatu...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Ecosystems and the biodiversity that underpin them are our life support systems. But the impact of declining trends in biodiversity and ecosystem services (BES) on economies and society is not well known outside the context of one-off local case studies. There is an urgent need to better understand and, importantly, to effectively communicate the i...
Article
Nature recreation and tourism is a substantial ecosystem service of Europe's countryside that has a substantial economic value and contributes considerably to income and employment of local communities. Highlighting the recreational value and economic contribution of nature areas can be used as a strong argument for the funding of protected and rec...
Article
Full-text available
We conduct a CV and a CE experiment using a generic rather than a situation-specific study design in order to obtain a generic marginal value function for different types of natural areas with different characteristics in the Netherlands. We develop a modelling approach in which we use CV and CE choice data in one model. The value function obtained...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The living resources of the Pacific Ocean are part of the region's rich natural capital. Marine and coastal ecosystems provide benefits for all people in and beyond the region. These benefits are called ecosystem services and include a broad range of values linking the environment with development and human well-being. Yet, the natural capital of t...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The study assesses the economic value of forest ecosystem services under alternative scenarios for future forest management, focusing on ecosystem services that are of high importance and potentially threatened, and prepares relevant policy recommendations.
Article
Full-text available
Reefs and People at Risk Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere put shallow, warm-water coral reef ecosystems, and the people who depend upon them at risk from two key global environmental stresses: 1) elevated sea surface temperature (that can cause coral bleaching and related mortality), and 2) ocean acidification. These global str...
Chapter
http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/life-sciences/ecology-and-conservation/peatland-restoration-and-ecosystem-services-science-policy-and-practice?format=PB
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We map recreational visits and the economic value per visit spatially explicit across Europe’s non-urban ecosystems using GIS, meta-analysis and geostatistical modelling techniques. Therefore, we developed a meta-analytic visitor arrival function and a meta-analytic value transfer function by regression analysis. Primary data on the dependent varia...
Article
Full-text available
Recreation is a major ecosystem service and an important co-benefit of nature conservation. The recreational value of National Parks (NPs) can be a strong argument in favour of allocating resources for preserving and creating NPs worldwide. Managing NPs to optimize recreational services can therefore indirectly contribute to nature conservation and...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The living resources of the Pacific Ocean are part of the region's rich natural capital. Marine and coastal ecosystems provide benefits for all people in and beyond the region. These benefits are called ecosystem services and include a broad range of values linking the environment with development and human well-being. Yet, the natural capital of t...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The living resources of the Pacific Ocean are part of the region's rich natural capital. Marine and coastal ecosystems provide benefits for all people in and beyond the region. These benefits are called ecosystem services and include a broad range of values linking the environment with development and human well-being. Yet, the natural capital of t...
Technical Report
The living resources of the Pacific Ocean are part of the region's rich natural capital. Marine and coastal ecosystems provide benefits for all people in and beyond the region. These benefits are called ecosystem services and include a broad range of values linking the environment with development and human well-being. Yet, the natural capital of t...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The living resources of the Pacific Ocean are part of the region's rich natural capital. Marine and coastal ecosystems provide benefits for all people in and beyond the region. These benefits are called ecosystem services and include a broad range of values linking the environment with development and human well-being. Yet, the natural capital of t...
Chapter
This chapter illustrates the process of mapping ecosystem service values with an application to coral reef recreational values in Southeast Asia . The case study provides an estimate of the value of reef-related recreation foregone, due to the decline in coral reef area in Southeast Asia , under a baseline scenario for the period 2000–2050. This va...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Coastal and marine ecosystems provide a variety of ecological functions1 that directly and indirectly translate to economic services with value to humans. For example, they support fish populations that constitute a significant source of protein and sustain ecosystem stability through conservation of biodiversity and mitigation of climate change th...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean acidification is a global, long-term problem whose ultimate solution requires carbon dioxide reduction at a scope and scale that will take decades to accomplish successfully. Until that is achieved, feasible and locally relevant adaptation and mitigation measures are needed. To help to prioritize societal responses to ocean acidification, we...