Luke T Barrett

Luke T Barrett
University of Melbourne | MSD · School of BioSciences

BSc Hons PhD

About

28
Publications
8,691
Reads
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377
Citations
Introduction
I'm interested in applied questions about anthropogenic marine environments, including on (1) interactions between aquaculture and wild animal populations, (2) animal welfare in sea cage fish farming, and (3) conservation of kelp/seaweed reef habitats.
Additional affiliations
March 2018 - present
University of Melbourne
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Sea lice detection and control methods for Norwegian salmon aquaculture (with Norwegian Institute of Marine Research)
March 2014 - March 2018
University of Melbourne
Position
  • Demonstrator/Tutor
Description
  • Tutorials, practicals, field trips and marking for second and third year ecology and zoology subjects
February 2014 - February 2018
University of Melbourne
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Habitat preferences and fitness consequence for fauna associated with novel marine environments
Education
February 2009 - June 2013
University of Western Australia
Field of study
  • Zoology and Marine Biology

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Full-text available
Disease and parasitism cause major welfare, environmental and economic concerns for global aquaculture. In this review, we examine the status and potential of technologies that exploit genetic variation in host resistance to tackle this problem. We argue that there is an urgent need to improve understanding of the genetic mechanisms involved, leadi...
Article
Macroalgae‐dominated reefs are a prominent habitat in tropical seascapes that support a diversity of fishes, including fishery target species. To what extent, then, do macroalgal habitats contribute to small‐scale tropical reef fisheries? To address this question we: (1) Quantified the macroalgae‐associated fish component in catches from 133 small‐...
Article
Full-text available
Investment in extractive or ‘non-fed’ aquaculture has been proposed as a partial solution for sustainable food provision. An important aspect is the potential for aquaculture-environment interactions to influence the provision of ecosystem services. Here, we quantify and monetise the impacts of bivalve and seaweed farming on a regulating service (r...
Article
Salmonid aquaculture, producing nearly 3 million tons per year, has expanded across temperate seascapes around the globe in recent decades. Cage technologies used to farm salmonids are thought to have changed in both size and location in coastal environments, yet remarkably little data exists to explain these major developments. Using satellite ima...
Article
As aquaculture expands, ensuring the sustainability of practices requires a focus on minimising environmental effects. At the same time, where fish are cultured, their welfare needs to be secured to ensure compliance with legislation and gain social acceptance of farming practices. However, clear conflicts exist between protecting the environment a...
Article
Full-text available
Aquaculture can have negative environmental impacts, adding to the suite of anthropogenic stressors that challenge coastal ecosystems. However, a growing body of scientific evidence indicates that the commercial cultivation of bivalve shellfish and seaweed can deliver valuable ecosystem goods and services, including provision of new habitats for fi...
Article
Full-text available
Sea-cage fish farming is typically open to the environment, with disease transmission possible between farmed and wild hosts. In salmonid aquaculture, salmon lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) infestations cause production losses, reduce welfare for farmed fish, and increase infestation rates for wild fish populations. The high density of hosts in farm...
Article
Humans are altering marine ecosystems at unprecedented rates, and these changes can result in animals selecting poor‐quality habitats if the cues they use become misleading. Such “ecological traps” increase extinction risk, reduce ecosystem resilience, and are a consequence of human‐induced rapid environmental change. Although there is growing evid...
Article
Full-text available
A variety of tagging techniques are now available to monitor fish behaviour, physiology and their environmental experience. Tagging is frequently used in aquaculture research to monitor free-swimming individuals within farmed populations. However, for information gathered from tagged fish to be representative of farmed populations, tagging must not...
Article
Biodiverse ecosystems are sometimes inherently resistant to invasion, but environmental change can facilitate invasion by disturbing natural communities and providing resources that are underutilised by native species. In such cases, sufficiently abundant native predators may help to limit invasive population growth. We studied native and invasive...
Chapter
The natural environment has been altered by anthropogenic actions for several centuries. For example, land clearing, water diversion and abstraction for agriculture have changed aquatic ecosystems, as have inputs from various diffuse and point-source pollution sources. The alteration of natural waterbodies leads to water quality and habitat changes...
Article
Full-text available
Canopy-forming macroalgae can construct extensive meadow habitats in tropical seascapes occupied by fishes that span a diversity of taxa, life-history stages and ecological roles. Our synthesis assessed whether these tropical macroalgal habitats have unique fish assemblages, provide fish nurseries and support local fisheries. We also applied a meta...
Article
Full-text available
Ectoparasitic salmon louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) infestations are costly for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) farmers in Norway. As a result, there is a strong desire for solutions to prevent and control infestations, and new technologies are typically developed and commercialised rapidly, without rigorous validation. Here, we tested the efficacy...
Article
Full-text available
The Atlantic salmon aquaculture industry still struggles with ectoparasitic sea lice despite decades of research and development invested into louse removal methods. In contrast, methods to prevent infestations before they occur have received relatively little research effort, yet may offer key benefits over treatment-focused methods. Here, we summ...
Article
Sea-cage salmon farming creates ideal conditions for ectoparasites such as the salmon louse Lepeophtheirus salmonis, with high lice densities leading to welfare challenges for stock and increasing lice burdens on wild salmonids. New treatments with low environmental impacts and minimal handling are needed to complement existing strategies. Irradiat...
Article
Full-text available
Problematic sea lice infestations on farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) have motivated extensive research and development into new methods to prevent, monitor and control sea lice. Most of these technologies require detailed information on the behaviour, spatial distribution, and demography of lice on host fish. This study investigated how salmon...
Article
Full-text available
Canopy-forming macroalgae can construct extensive meadow habitats in tropical seascapes occupied by fishes that span a diversity of taxa, life history stages and ecological roles. Our synthesis assessed whether these tropical macroalgal habitats have unique fish assemblages, provide fish nurseries, and support local fisheries. We also applied a met...
Article
The salmon aquaculture industry has adopted the use of invertivorous 'cleaner fishes' (CF) for biological control of sea lice infestations on farmed salmon. At present, ~50 million CF are used annually in Norway alone, with variable success in experimental and industrial contexts. We used a national-scale database of lice counts, delousing treatmen...
Article
Full-text available
Stocking cleaner fish to control sea lice infestations in Atlantic salmon farms is widespread and viewed as a salmon welfare-friendly alternative to current delousing control treatments. The escalating demand for cleaner fish (~60 million stocked per year) coupled with evidence of poor welfare and high mortality in sea cages requires that the lice...
Article
The global expansion of aquaculture has raised concerns about its environmental impacts, including effects on wildlife. Aquaculture farms are thought to repel some species and function as either attractive population sinks ('ecological traps') or population sources for others. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of empirical studies...
Article
Background: Sea lice infestations on Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) farms are a considerable burden on the industry and put wild salmonid populations at risk. Frequent delousing treatments are necessary to keep lice densities below allowable limits, but currently viable treatments have drawbacks in terms of financial cost, animal welfare, or enviro...
Article
Animals that select the best available habitats are most likely to succeed in degraded environments, but ecological change can create evolutionarily unfamiliar habitats that may be under- or over-utilized by native fauna. In temperate coastal waters, eutrophication and grazing have driven a global decline in native seaweeds and facilitated the esta...
Preprint
Animals that select the best available habitats are most likely to succeed in degraded environments, but ecological change can create evolutionarily unfamiliar habitats that may be under‐ or over‐utilized by native fauna. In temperate coastal waters, eutrophication and grazing have driven a global decline in native seaweeds and facilitated the esta...
Preprint
The global expansion of aquaculture has raised concerns about its environmental impacts, including effects on wildlife. Aquaculture farms are thought to repel some species and function as either attractive population sinks (‘ecological traps’) or population sources for others. We conducted a systematic review and meta‐analysis of empirical studies...
Article
Full-text available
Sea cage fish aquaculture attracts large aggregations of wild fish that feed on farm waste. Fish that associate closely with farms undergo physiological changes, and captive feeding trials indicate possible negative effects on reproductive fitness. However, little is known about the significance of this phenomenon for reproduction in wild fish over...
Article
Farmed fish that escape and mix with wild fish populations can have significant ecological and genetic consequences. To reduce the number of escaped fish in the wild, recapture is often attempted. Here, we review the behaviours of escapees post-escape, and how recapture success varies with escaped fish size, the size of the initial escape event and...
Article
Namena is Fiji's oldest and second largest no-take marine reserve, and has relatively high abundance and biomass of targeted fishes within its boundaries due to a high level of protection since its creation in 1997. Following anecdotal reports of exceptionally high fish abundance at the Grand Central Station dive site within Namena, we conducted a...
Article
Full-text available
Males pay considerable reproductive costs in acquiring mates (precopulatory sexual selection) and in producing ejaculates that are effective at fertilising eggs in the presence of competing ejaculates (postcopulatory sexual selection). Given these costs, males must balance their reproductive investment in a given mating to optimise their future rep...

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