Łukasz Walas

Łukasz Walas
Polish Academy of Sciences | PAN · Institute of Dendrology of the Polish Academy of Sciences

PhD

About

21
Publications
9,909
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
102
Citations
Additional affiliations
May 2021 - present
Polish Academy of Sciences
Position
  • Researcher
Education
September 2015 - June 2021
Polish Academy of Sciences
Field of study
  • Biology
October 2013 - July 2015
University of Zielona Góra
Field of study
  • Biology (specialization: Molecular biology)
October 2010 - July 2013
University of Zielona Góra
Field of study
  • Biotechnology

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Full-text available
The Hyrcanian Forests in Northern Iran, listed as a UNESCO's World Heritage Site, contains the last remnants of an ancient, widespread Tertiary broad-leaved forest. Little research, however, has examined the consequences of climate change on the distribution patterns of the rich endemic flora of this ecoregion. Climate change can be a major, and un...
Article
Full-text available
Clustering methods based on environmental variables are useful in the planning of conservation strategies for species and ecosystems. However, there is a lack of work on the regionalization of the vast space of North Africa and the distribution of plant species. The current lists of endemic plants are focused mostly on an occurrence at the country...
Article
Full-text available
The Mediterranean Basin is one of the 36 global hotspots of biodiversity and it is rich in endemic tree species. The complex geological history of the region throughout the Neogene and Quaternary periods that were marked with several palaeoclimatic transformations was a major factor triggering the genetic divergence of lineages in tree species in t...
Article
Full-text available
Pterocarya fraxinifolia, native to the southern Caucasus and adjacent areas, has been widely introduced in Europe. In this study, we investigate the following: (1) How did its current distribution form? (2) What are the past, current, and future suitable habitats of P. fraxinifolia? (3) What is the best conservation approach? Ecological niche model...
Article
Full-text available
Scots pine is one of the most widely occurring pines, but future projections suggest a large reduction in its range, mostly at the southern European limits. A significant part of its range is located in the Caucasus, a global hot-spot of diversity. Pine forests are an important reservoir of biodiversity and endemism in this region. We explored demo...
Article
Full-text available
Sorbus aucuparia (Rosaceae) is a small tree species widely distributed in Eurasia. The Hyrcanian forest is the southernmost distribution limit of this species. Severe habitat degradation and inadequate human interventions have endangered the long-term survival of this species in this region, and it is necessary to develop and apply appropriate mana...
Article
Full-text available
Kasztanowiec zwyczajny (Aesculus hippocastanum L.), popularne drzewo ozdobne, został sprowadzony do centralnej Europy z Istambułu. Pojawił się pod koniec XVI wieku w Wiedniu, Bolonii, Padwie i Pradze. Szybko stał się popularny i w krótkim czasie dotarł do Anglii, Niemiec i Francji. W Polsce po raz pierwszy znalazł się prawdopodobnie w XVI wieku, sp...
Article
Full-text available
New nuclear microsatellite markers (SSRs) were developed for Aesculus hippocastanum, a relict tree species from the Balkan Peninsula. The development of microsatellites was done using the Illumina MiSeq PE300 platform. Out of a set of 500 SSRs designed, a subset of 13 loci was tested using 290 individuals from seven natural populations. Twelve spec...
Article
Full-text available
Cupressus atlantica is a narrow endemic species of semi-arid and sub-humid habitats in the western High Atlas, Morocco. We explored the possible dynamics of the species’ range under climatic changes using species distribution modelling (SDM) to identify populations vulnerable to range changes. Additionally, we investigated the spatial genetic struc...
Article
Full-text available
Juniperus thurifera is a key element of the forest communities in arid and semi-arid areas of the western Mediterranean. Previous genetic and morphological investigations suggested that Algerian populations are genetically more similar to European than to Moroccan populations and advocated their recognition at the variety rank. We aimed to investig...
Article
Full-text available
Horse-chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L.) is an endemic and relict species from the Mediterranean biodiversity hotspot and a popular ornamental tree. Knowledge about the evolutionary history of this species remains scarce. Here, we ask what historical and ecological factors shaped the pattern of genetic diversity and differentiation of this specie...
Article
Full-text available
Pleistocene climatic changes affected the current distribution and genetic structure of alpine plants. Some refugial areas for the high elevation species have been proposed in the Alps, but whether they could survive on nunataks, is still controversial. Here, the spatial genetic structure in Salix serpillifolia revealed by chloroplast (cpSSR) and n...
Article
Full-text available
Juniperus drupacea is a unique relict species found in the mountains of southern Greece, southern Turkey, and western Syria and Lebanon. The aim of this study was to describe the natural range of this juniper by determining the current locations of its populations and to predict a theoretical range for the species based on current, past, and future...
Article
Riparian trees, especially relict trees, are attractive and important for research to understand both past and recent biogeographical and evolutionary processes. Our work is the first study to elucidate the genetic diversity and spatial genetic structure of the canopy-dominating riparian Pterocarya fraxinifolia (Juglandaceae) along two altitudinal...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to update figures for the presence of dioecy among the gymnosperms and investigate its correlation with climate, growth form, pollination and seed dispersal syndromes, and risk of extinction. Dioecy was found in almost 65% of contemporary gymnosperm species, a higher percentage than previous estimates. It dominates in 8 of...
Article
Full-text available
Aesculus hippocastanum is a well-known species, which is popular because of its ornamental value. However, data on the demographic structure and potential distribution of A. hippocastanum are limited. The invasion of Cameraria ohridella into Europe has harmed those trees growing in artificial sites, but the presence of this insect in natural stands...
Article
Full-text available
Damage by herbivore grazing negatively influences the development of subsequent forest generations. Little is known about the long-term impacts of grazing and interactions between grazing and light conditions on sapling growth after the cessation of herbivory impact. In this study, Taxus baccata saplings were grown over a period of four years in ar...
Article
Full-text available
The knowledge on chorology of species is basic for biogeographic and ecological studies and for conservation actions. The data on the chorology of Taxus baccata in Morocco have not been studied. The bibliographic resources, herbarium material, unpublished data of several botanists and the authors’ field notes have been reviewed. Two yew populatio...
Article
Full-text available
Taxus baccata L. has a scattered distribution and the decline of yew woodlands is observed across the entire species range. Passively protected populations in the central and northern part of their distribution are declining without human intervention. However, the establishment of new yew populations is observed in habitats that have been signific...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Better understanding of the status of the natural populations of horse-chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum), their genetic resources and the potential impact of climate change on the species' range.
Project
The Zelkova (Ulmaceae) and Pterocarya (Juglandaceae) genera are the Arcto- Tertiary relics, which survived in fragmented refugia in southern Europe and the eastern and western parts of Asia. In the Pleistocene they occurred throughout Europe, but due to glaciations their range was limited to a few localities in southern Europe (Zelkova sicula, Z. abelicea), West Asia (Z. carpinifolia, Pterocarya fraxinifolia) and East Asia (Z. serrata, Z. cyanosis, Z. schneideri, P. hupehensis, P. rhoifolia, P. stenoptera and P. tonkinensis). Both taxa, despite the common history of migrations and similar occurrence area, ocupy two opposite habitats. Species of the genus Pterocarya inhabit flooded riparian forests, and species of the genus Zelkova grows in dry or rocky areas , often at higher altitudes. The aim of the project is to explain which of the phenotypic traits have allowed the above-mentioned species survive glaciation in opposite habitats and how the long-lasting effect of different factors of natural selection (eg. geographical isolation) has led to a widening gap between individuals of distinct (separated) populations and, consequently, speciation.