Luis E. Robledo-Ospina

Luis E. Robledo-Ospina
Universidad Veracruzana | UV · Instituto de Biotecnología y Ecología Aplicada (INBIOTECA)

PhD.

About

11
Publications
3,229
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49
Citations
Additional affiliations
June 2011 - July 2014
University of Caldas
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • Invertebrate Zoology Arthropods Biology

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Search images are perceptual biases acquired through experience that improve an individual’s ability to detect the object of their search (e.g., a predator seeking prey). In hymenopterans, examples include floral search images in bees and acquired sensory biases towards specific prey in wasp predators. Mud dauber wasps exhibit individual specializa...
Article
Full-text available
Many animals use visual traits as a predator defence. Understanding these visual traits from the perspective of predators is critical in generating new insights about predator–prey interactions. In this paper, we propose a novel framework to support the study of strategies that exploit the visual system of predators. With spiders as our model taxon...
Article
Full-text available
Ambush predators depend on cryptic body colouration, stillness and a suitable hunting location to optimise the probability of prey capture. Detection of cryptic predators, such as crab spiders, by flower seeking wasps may also be hindered by wind induced movement of the flowers themselves. In a beach dune habitat, Microbembex nigrifrons wasps appro...
Article
Full-text available
Mientras el cine, la literatura y los mitos han contribuido a la percepción errónea de las arañas como seres siniestros que habitan en lugares lúgubres y oscuros, nuestra convivencia con ellas y la importancia que tienen para la salud de los ecosistemas pasan desapercibidas. Además de describir a estos maravillosos seres ancestrales y su relación c...
Preprint
Full-text available
Ambush predators depend on cryptic body colouration, stillness and a suitable hunting location to optimise the probability of prey capture. Detection of cryptic predators, such as crab spiders, by flower seeking wasps may also be hindered by wind induced movement of the flowers themselves. In a beach dune habitat, as Microbembex nigrifrons wasps ap...
Article
While foraging, it is critical for a predator to detect and recognize its prey quickly in order to optimize its energy investment. In response, prey can use low-cost energy strategies such as crypsis and immobility that operate early in the detection–attack sequence. Mesopredators, such as spiders, are themselves attacked by visually oriented preda...
Article
Prey morphology and size are known to influence a predator’s decision to attack and consume particular prey; however, studies that evaluate both traits simultaneously are uncommon. Here, we first described the trophic niche in the mygalomorph spider Paratropis sp. These spiders have a narrow trophic niche and feed mainly on sympatric species such a...
Article
Full-text available
Many animals use body coloration as a strategy to communicate with conspecifics, prey, and predators. Color is a trade-off for some species, since they should be visible to conspecifics but cryptic to predators and prey. Some flower-dwelling predators, such as crab spiders, are capable of choosing the color of flowers where they ambush flower visit...
Article
Full-text available
Camouflage is used by prey to avoid detection by predators, and by predators to remain unseen by their prey. Effective camouflage can be achieved through background matching, where an animal matches the colours and patterns of the background or through disruptive coloration, where high-contrast markings disrupt the viewer’s ability to detect the an...
Article
Full-text available
Generalist predators have to deal with prey with sometimes very different morphologies and defensive behaviors. Therefore, such predators are expected to express plasticity in their predation strategy. Here we investigated the predatory behavior of the recluse spider Loxosceles rufipes (Araneae, Sicariidae) when attacking prey with different morpho...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The objective of this project is to study the camouflage in spiders of the Neotama genre from the visual systems of ecologically relevant observers