Luis Palazzesi

Luis Palazzesi
Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia" · Paleobotanica

About

57
Publications
21,853
Reads
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1,588
Citations
Citations since 2016
29 Research Items
895 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
Additional affiliations
August 2013 - August 2015
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Position
  • PostDoc Position
March 2001 - present
Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia"
Position
  • Staff

Publications

Publications (57)
Article
Full-text available
Significance The flowering plant family Asteraceae (e.g. sunflowers, daisies, chrysanthemums), with about 23,000 species, is found almost everywhere in the world except in Antarctica. Asteraceae (or Compositae) are regarded as one of the most influential families in the diversification and evolution of a large number of animals that heavily depends...
Article
Full-text available
The Patagonian steppe-a massive rain-shadow on the lee side of the southern Andes-is assumed to have evolved ~15-12 Myr as a consequence of the southern Andean uplift. However, fossil evidence supporting this assumption is limited. Here we quantitatively estimate climatic conditions and plant richness for the interval ~10-6 Myr based on the study a...
Article
Full-text available
The timing of major turnovers in terrestrial ecosystems of the Cenozoic Era has been largely interpreted from the analysis of the assumed feeding preference of extinct mammals. For example, the expansion of open-habitat ecosystems (grasslands or savannas) is inferred to have occurred earlier in Patagonia than elsewhere because of the early advent o...
Article
Full-text available
The structure of the living Patagonian flora, dominated by the steppe, is a direct consequence of past climatic and tectonic events. These arid-adapted communities were widespread during the Late Neogene, but their origin in Patagonia can be traced back to the Paleogene. Vegetational trends throughout Paleocene-Miocene time are based on available p...
Article
Full-text available
Fossil capitula and pollen grains of Asteraceae from the Eocene of Patagonia, southern Argentina, exhibit morphological features recognized today in taxa, such as Mutisioideae and Carduoideae, that are phylogenetically close to the root of the asteracean tree. This fossil supports the hypothesis of a South American origin of Asteraceae and an Eocen...
Article
With c. 24 700 species (10% of all flowering plants), Asteraceae are one of the largest and most phenotypically diverse angiosperm families, with considerable economic and ecological importance. Asteraceae are distributed worldwide, from nearly polar latitudes all the way to the tropics, and occur across a diverse range of habitats from extreme des...
Article
Full-text available
Polyploidy is a widespread phenomenon across angiosperms, and one of the main drivers of diversification. Whilst it frequently involves hybridisation, autopolyploidy is also an important feature of plant evolution. Minority cytotypes are frequently overlooked due to their lower frequency in populations, but the development of techniques such as flo...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this Special Issue is to improve understanding of the uplift of the Andes and its far-reaching impact on climate and biodiversity in South America from the late Mesozoic onwards. The Andes form the backbone of the South American continent and are the world's most biodiverse mountain system (Pérez-Escobar et al., in press). This biodivers...
Article
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Morphological diversity (disparity) is a key component of biodiversity, and increasingly a focus of botanical research. Despite the wide range of morphologies represented by pollen grains, to date there are few studies focused on the controls on pollen disparity and morphospace occupation, and fewer still considering these parameters in a phylogene...
Article
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Grasslands are predicted to experience a major biodiversity change by the year 2100. A better understanding of how grasslands have responded to past environmental changes will help predict the outcome of current and future environmental changes. Here, we explore the relationship between past atmospheric CO 2 and temperature fluctuations and the shi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Grasslands are predicted to experience a major biodiversity change by the year 2100 in part due to recent and projected increases in atmospheric CO 2 concentration. A better understanding of how grasslands have responded to past environmental changes will help predict the outcome of current and future environmental changes. Here, we explore the rel...
Article
The fossil record from Cenozoic sediments provides a great deal of information that has direct bearing on the early assembling of modern Patagonian ecosystems. In this synthesis, we revise selected fossil marine and terrestrial records from the last 66 Ma with the aim of understanding major shifts of Patagonian biotas. From the Paleocene to the mid...
Article
Plant species with predominantly tropical and subtropical modern distributions (or meso-megathermal species) penetrated into the highest southern latitudes of the American continent during the global warmest periods of the Cenozoic. These species – usually phylogenetically unrelated – became fossilized typically as dispersed spores and pollen grain...
Article
Full-text available
A major reorganization of Patagonian ecosystems occurred when permanent ice sheets appeared in Antarctica and the Andean Range uplifted in southern South America. Rich plant communities dominated by Gondwanan trees and other species with tropical modern distribution vanished and those with cool and arid distributions rose to prominence. Rather than...
Article
Full-text available
PREMISE: Phylogenetic studies in the Compositae are challenging due to the sheer size of the family and the challenges they pose for molecular tools, ranging from the genomic impact of polyploid events to their very conserved plastid genomes. The search for better molecular tools for phylogenetic studies led to the development of the family-specifi...
Article
Key information for regional biostratigraphic, climatic and environmental reconstructions for the Miocene of the southwestern Atlantic margin can be obtained by qualitative and quantitative palynological analysis at the onshore YPF-CH-PV.es-1 borehole (PV borehole) in the Valdés Basin, combined with previously documented organic-walled dinoflagella...
Article
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The data presented here are related to the research article "Miocene Atlantic transgressive-regressive events in northeastern and offshore Patagonia: a palynological perspective" (Guler et al. in press). A total of 60 drilled cutting samples from a 580 m-thick subsurface stratigraphic section (YPF.Ch.PV.es-1 borehole) in Península Valdés, Chubut Pr...
Article
Full-text available
A major climate shift took place about 40 Myr ago-the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum or MECO-triggered by a significant rise of atmospheric CO 2 concentrations. The biotic response to this MECO is well documented in the marine realm, but poorly explored in adjacent landmasses. Here, we quantify the response of the floras from America's south-ernmos...
Article
Asexual reproduction has often been regarded as an evolutionary dead end, but asexual lineages (most notably those that are apomictic) are present in several angiosperm families and often comprise a large number of taxa, both widespread and endemic. Investigating correlations between genetic, environmental and taxonomic factors and the incidence of...
Article
The breakup of Gondwana and the associated climatic changes led to the fragmentation of floras that were once connected across the Southern lands. The diversity of the Gondwanan remnants has long been assumed to have fluctuated in Patagonia across the Cenozoic, although it has never been quantified so far. Here we address when the major floristic m...
Article
Asexual reproduction has often been regarded as an evolutionary dead end, but asexual lineages (most notably those that are apomictic) are present in several angiosperm families and often comprise a large number of taxa, both widespread and endemic. Investigating correlations between genetic, environmental and taxonomic factors and the incidence of...
Chapter
Large areas of Earth’s continents were covered by temperate forests before the dramatic increase of the human population in the past two millennia. Prior to human expansion, temperate forests were more extensive in the Neogene (23–2.6 Ma) when climate at the middle latitudes was slightly warmer and more equable than at the present. These temperate...
Article
Full-text available
Coriariaceae comprise only Coriaria, a genus of shrubs with nine species in Australasia (but excluding Australia), five in the Himalayas, Taiwan, the Philippines, and Japan, one in the Mediterranean, and one ranging from Patagonia to Mexico. The sister family, Corynocarpaceae, comprises five species of evergreen trees from New Guinea to New Zealand...
Article
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The replacement of seed‐free plants and gymnosperms by flowering plants during the Cretaceous is one of the most important biotic events in the evolution of life. However, the magnitude of this global turnover remains largely unknown. ‐Here we present sampling‐standardized diversity estimates from a high resolution palynological record of the Late...
Article
The recent discovery of pollen grains assigned to the earliest branch of Asteraceae from Cretaceous sediments in Antarctica prompted us to examine the pollen from five lesser known members of Asterales (Alseuosmiaceae, Argophyllaceae, Pentaphragmataceae, Phellinaceae and Roussaceae) that might also be represented in fossil sediments. Detailed polle...
Article
Full-text available
Effective adherence of pollen grains on the surface of the stigma is a crucial condition for tube germination and subsequent fertilization of ovules. We provide evidence, through computer simulations, that echinate and microechinate sculpture of pollen in Asteraceae could play an important role in that process. We show that electrostatic interactio...
Chapter
Two major marine transgressions covered part of Patagonia during the Miocene and both are recorded in the Península Valdés region. The older (early Miocene) is represented by the volumetrically scarce outcrops of the Gaiman Formation, composed by shelf mudstones and fine sandstones. The late Miocene transgression is represented by the Puerto Madryn...
Article
Full-text available
Nothofagaceae (southern beeches) are a relatively small flowering plant family of trees confined to the Southern Hemisphere. The fossil record of the family is abundant and it has been widely used as a test case for the classic hypothesis that Antarctica, Patagonia, Australia and New Zealand were once joined together. Although the phylogenetic rela...
Article
Full-text available
Extract We thank Panero (1) for his interest in our paper (2). However, we consider his interpretations (1) somewhat incomplete and misleading, principally because he reports results using methods that we did not apply in our study, and underestimates the importance of pollen morphological characters in phylogenetic studies. We respond to each of t...
Article
Barnadesioideae (94 species) is the sister subfamily to the rest of the Asteraceae (23,000 species). Pollen grains in this subfamily are structurally and sculpturally distinctive and diverse. Although pollen morphology has contributed to the taxonomy of the subfamily, there is a gap of knowledge concerning the evolution of the exine structure. This...
Chapter
Full-text available
Humid forested communities from eastern Patagonia were replaced by open habitat ecosystems sometime during the mid Miocene. This major turnover involved a significant physiognomic replacement (i.e. a tree-dominated biome by a shrub-dominated biome), although its associated shift in plant diversity through this time interval has never been quantitat...
Article
Full-text available
THE PRESENCE OF A NEOTROPICAL FAMILY (MALPIGHIACEAE) IN THE FAR SOUTH OF SOUTH AMERICA DURING THE EOCENE. Presented here is the discovery of pollen grains and a foliar impression assigned to Malpighiaceae from the Río Turbio Formation, SW Santa Cruz Province, indicating the presence of this Neotropical family in the southernmost tip of South Americ...
Article
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The origin of Geraniales (approximately 900 species in three families: Geraniaceae, Melianthaceae, and Vivianiaceae) is traced back to the Cretaceous of Gondwana, yet their geotemporal history is largely unknown because of a limited fossil record and incomplete phylogenies. In the present study, we provide the first fossil record of Vivianiaceae an...
Article
Full-text available
Morphological, molecular and biogeographical information bearing on early evolution of the sunflower alliance of families suggests that the clade containing the extant daisy family (Asteraceae) differentiated in South America during the Eocene, although palaeontological studies on this continent failed to reveal conclusive support for this hypothes...
Article
A new vertebrate faunal assemblage was recently discovered from the uppermost part of the late Miocene Puerto Madryn Formation. These deposits crop out along the southwestern coast of the Península Valdés area near Punta Delgada (Chubut Province, Argentina). The exhumed vertebrate fauna includes a range of fish, bird and mammal taxa, of which the l...
Article
Much of our knowledge of the past distribution and radiation of Asteraceae and allied families depends on the fossil pollen record. In recent years, new discoveries are coming to light from southern Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and southern South America (Patagonia). Unequivocally assigned morphotaxa from accurately dated sediments have permitte...
Article
Full-text available
The Late Oligocene Mutisiapollis telleriae, which is the oldest echinate fossil pollen of Asteraceae from Patagonia, was tentatively related to the subfamily Mutisioideae. A detailed comparison of M. telleriae with extant asteraceous pollen indicates strong similarities with both Mutisioideae (in particular the Gongylolepis type) and Carduoideae (s...
Article
A new fossil pollen species (Psilatricolporites protrudens sp. nov) is described from Miocene sedimentary sections of the Chenque and Puerto Madryn formations (Chubut province, Argentina). The fossil pollen grains are characterized by being small, tricolporate, subspheroidal to suboblate in shape; rhombic outline in equatorial view and subtriangula...
Article
New fossil pollen grains were recovered from marine Miocene deposits from eastern Patagonia (southern South America). Sculpture and structure exine features indicate a close relationship with modern Barnadesioideae, a basal lineage within Asteraceae. Barnadesioideae is confined to South America and is represented mainly by shrubs, herbs and some tr...
Article
Terrestrial palynomorph assemblages have been recovered from the Río Leona Formation, southwestern Santa Cruz Province, southern South America. Organic debris (spores, pollen grains, fresh water algae, plant tissues and fungi) are preserved in shales associated with other plant fossil remains (leaves and wood). The Río Leona Formation is here assig...
Article
Full-text available
Pollen grains of Celtis tala (Celtidaceae), Phytolacca dioica (Phytolaccaceae), Schinopsis balansae (Anacardiaceae) and Solidago chilensis (Asteraceae) are examined with light and scanning electron microscopy, described, and illustrated. These four unrelated species are native to southern South America and considered an important source of skin pri...
Article
This chapter focuses on the main trends of the Late Miocene Patagonian vegetation. Several forcing factors may have influenced Miocene vegetation trends to their current establishment. The development of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current was of particular importance, which prevented equatorial currents from penetrating into the southern polar regio...
Article
Full-text available
Fossil pollen grains with morphological features unique in the subtribe Nassauviinae (tribe Mutisieae, Asteraceae) occur in Miocene marine deposits of eastern Patagonia, southern South America. A new morphogenus and two morphospecies are proposed to assemble fossil pollen grains characterized by having a complex bilayered exine structure with delic...
Article
Full-text available
The Asteraceae are classified into three subfamilies: Barnadesioideae, Cichorioideae, and Asteroideae. It has been suggested that the southern South American subfamily Barnadesioideae is the basal branch of the phylogenetic tree of the family, and Patagonia is the ancestral area of Asteraceae. Here we explore the chronological records of some membe...
Article
The patterns of Patagonian vegetation change suggest a strong relationship between the major thermal characters of the flora and the global paleoclimatic trends during Tertiary times. This conclusion was reached from the assessment of fossil pollen data from Patagonia throughout the Paleogene and Early Neogene periods and the subsequent comparison...
Article
Full-text available
The structure of the living Patagonian flora, dominated by the steppe, is a direct consequence of past climatic and tectonic events. These arid-adapted communities were widespread during the Late Neogene, but their origin in Patagonia can be traced back to the Paleogene. Vegetational trends throughout Paleocene-Miocene time are based on available p...
Article
A diverse and well preserved palynological assemblage is described for the first time from Puerto Madryn Formation, Puerto Pirámide outcrops, Valdés Peninsula. A Middle Miocene or Late Miocene age was suggested based on fossil remains or radiometric records. The recovered palynologic assemblage has palynomorphs of marine and continental origins, pr...
Article
Full-text available
Resumen The vegetational evolution from Chubut andSanta Cruzduring the Cenozoic, considering fossil spore-pollen assemblages, was analized. Particular attention was placed on herbaceous and shrubby communities. A vegetation dominated by tropical elements would have developed during the Paleocene. No evidence of open vegetation was recorded. Simila...

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Projects (3)
Project
CALL FOR PAPERS: GLOBAL AND PLANETARY CHANGE - SPECIAL ISSUE 2020 https://www.journals.elsevier.com/global-and-planetary-change/news/exploring-the-impact-of-andean-uplift-and-climate Submission portal now open! In Editorial Manager system indicate paper is intended for Special Issue. Please also indicate your preferred Guest Editor. Summary:The uplift of the Andean cordillera has had a far-reaching impact on climate and biodiversity in South America through the late Mesozoic and, more particularly, the Cenozoic Era. Across this period time, the Andes have become one the most species-rich global biodiversity hotspot because mountain ranges are tectonically dynamic over millions of years, creating new habitats and promoting biotic isolation and diversification. The uplift of the Andes also formed a dramatic topographic barrier to atmospheric circulation, and caused one of the most important orographic rain shadows on Earth. Hence, the development of massive deserts in South America, or even extreme hyperaridity, is also linked to the formation of the Andes. This special volume welcomes papers that focus on the relationships among mountain building, sedimentary processes, and biotic evolution in South America at different stages of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Guest editors: Carina Hoorn, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands Luis Palazzesi, Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales, Buenos Aires, Argentina Daniele Silvestro, Department of Biology, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
Project
My main goal is to characterize the patterns of change in floral diversity at the southern tip of Patagonia during the Eocene, as they relate to the paleoclimatic and paleogeographic changes that occurred during this interval. These changes were associated with the fragmentation of Western Gondwana and the establishment of the first glaciations in Antarctica in the late Eocene.
Project
(revised by Robert A. Gastaldo) Introduction - Direct contact with Nature is attractive to students and has an important impact on their desire to study, conserve and protect the environment. Likewise, learning programmes aiming to increase interest for palaeoenvironmental research, which informs us of past change, can be supplemented by virtual visits to the deep time (geological) contexts that are rich in ancient records of planet Earth. Such personal visits create emotions, and combining them with scientific instructions is a powerful teaching strategy. Topics and aims - Based on the considerations above, a coordinated project has been started to build an international undergraduate and post-graduate learning programme, supported by a book, about past environments. The aim is to illustrate several of the many steps of the history of Nature on our planet, exploiting the contribution of leading experts of different deep time intervals. The course will include 16 lecture Units of ca. 700 slides with a focus on terrestrial palaeoenvironments. Outstanding features and major transformations of natural systems during the Cenozoic, Mesozoic, and Palaeozoic will be shown by telling stories of key sites, particular geological contexts or objects, and distinguished research and researchers. Additionally, the goals of this learning programme are to be: 1) Attractive for students, simulating a walk through Nature; 2) "Relaxing" for both students, teachers, and other interested individuals, using simple language and avoiding complex topics that would need long explanations; 3) Up-to-date and scientifically correct, including artistic reconstructions of the highest fidelity; 4) Providing information and examples from around the world with a special focus on less known and less conventional information, such as palaeobotanical and palynological topics that can seem less attractive than others (e.g. fossil vertebrates) at first glance; and 5) Available for use to all contributors in its entirety for free. Palaeobotanical and palynological interest - The project is still a work in progress and open to accept helpful suggestions and constructive contributions from the palaeobotanical and palynological communities, who can propose relevant materials that are attractive to the intended audience. Since palynomorph-bearing organisms represent landscape-forming elements often not preserved as megafossils, a particularly successful opportunity is available. In fact, reconstructions of such organisms, in the framework of their ancient environments, complements information gained from the megafossil they produced. This "whole-organism" approach is particularly intriguing but also difficult to achieve, in particular for land plants that are generally fossilized in several scattered micro- and macroscopic parts, whose puzzle is very hard to piece together.