Luis Alfonso Ortiz Reyes

Luis Alfonso Ortiz Reyes
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute | OHRI · Clinical Epidemiology Program

MSc

About

29
Publications
7,739
Reads
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154
Citations
Additional affiliations
May 2017 - present
Clinical Evaluation Research Unit
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Management of multi-national clinical trials in critical care settings
July 2015 - May 2017
Harvard Medical School/Massachusetts General Hospital
Position
  • Research Associate
June 2012 - August 2013
Education
September 2015 - June 2017
January 2014 - January 2016
Instituto Politécnico Nacional
Field of study
  • Clinical Research
January 2008 - August 2012
Instituto Politécnico Nacional - CICS UMA
Field of study
  • Nutrition

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
BACKGROUND Glutamine is thought to have beneficial effects on the metabolic and stress response to severe injury. Clinical trials involving patients with burns and other critically ill patients have shown conflicting results regarding the benefits and risks of glutamine supplementation. METHODS In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled tria...
Article
Introduction: Real-world evidence on the timing and efficacy of enteral nutrition (EN) practices in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with circulatory shock is limited. We hypothesized early EN (EEN), as compared to delayed EN (DEN), is associated with improved clinical outcomes in mechanically ventilated (MV) patients with circulatory shock. Meth...
Article
We thank Vargas et al (1) for their interest in our recently published study in Critical Care Medicine (2). By analyzing the fragility index (FI) of all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) included in our systematic review and performing a trial sequential analysis (TSA) of our meta-analysis of overall mortality, they agreed with our position that...
Article
Vitamin C is an essential micronutrient with antioxidant properties and its use in critical illness has gained interest in recent years.1 Four systematic reviews/meta‐analyses (SRMAs) have been published in 2021 alone (see Table 1 summary).2‐5 These 4 SRMAs included between 8‐43 randomized controlled trials evaluating vitamin C with or without thia...
Article
Objectives: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the impact of IV vitamin C on outcomes in critically ill patients. Data Sources: Systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials. Study Selection: Randomized controlled trials testing IV vitamin C in critically ill patients....
Article
Full-text available
Background: Recent data on the prevalence of essential trace element (ETE) deficiencies in home parenteral nutrition (HPN) patients are scarce. We investigated whether ETE deficiencies are still an important issue for HPN patients and whether the prevalence of such deficiencies may be influenced by nationwide drug shortages. Methods: We conducted...
Article
Background: Whether nutrition therapy benefits all burn victims equally is unknown. To identify patients who will benefit the most from optimal nutrition, the modified Nutrition Risk in Critically Ill (mNUTRIC) Score has been validated in the Intensive Care Unit. However, the utility of mNUTRIC in severe burn victims is unknown. We hypothesized th...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Uncertainty remains about the best route and timing of medical nutrition therapy in the acute phase of critical illness. Early combined enteral (EN) and parenteral nutrition (PN) may represent an attractive option to achieve recommended energy and protein goals in select patient groups. This meta-analysis aims to update and summarize th...
Article
Background: Uncertainty remains about the best route and timing of medical nutrition therapy in the acute phase of critical illness. Early combined enteral (EN) and parenteral nutrition (PN) may represent an attractive option to achieve recommended energy and protein goals in select patient groups. This meta-analysis aims to update and summarize t...
Article
Objectives: To determine the incidence of enteral feed intolerance, identify factors associated with enteral feed intolerance, and assess the relationship between enteral feed intolerance and key nutritional and clinical outcomes in critically ill patients. Design: Analysis of International Nutrition Survey database collected prospectively from 20...
Article
Full-text available
Background The Enhanced Protein‐Energy Provision via the Enteral Route Feeding Protocol (PEP uP) has been shown to be feasible, safe, and effective in delivering significantly more energy/protein, though it has not been well studied in surgical/trauma patients. We hypothesized that PEP uP will effectively increase energy/protein delivery to critica...
Article
Full-text available
The guidelines recommendation for protein dose in critically ill patients is 1.2 - 2.0 g/kg/d. Despite this recommendation, the actual amount delivered ranks between 0.5 and 3.8 g/kg/d therefore there is significant controversy in the amount of protein prescribed and delivered worldwide. This review approach the clinical equipoise, or a state of ge...
Article
Full-text available
Background Neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a measure of host inflammatory response; a higher NLR is associated with worse clinical outcomes. Enteral nutrition (EN) may mitigate inflammation through interaction with gut‐associated lymphoid tissue. We hypothesized that early EN adequacy in critically ill surgical patients is associated with lowe...
Article
Background Unintentional underfeeding is common in patients receiving enteral nutrition (EN), and is associated with increased risk of malnutrition complications. Protocols for EN in critically ill patients have been shown to enhance adequacy, resulting in better clinical outcomes; however, outside of intensive care unit (ICU) settings, the influen...
Research
Background Unintentional underfeeding is common in patients receiving enteral nutrition (EN), and is associated with increased risk of malnutrition complications. Protocols for EN in critically ill patients have been shown to enhance adequacy, resulting in better clinical outcomes; however, outside of intensive care unit (ICU) settings, the influen...
Article
Full-text available
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Patients receiving >=80% of their energy requirements by enteral nutrition (EN) have better clinical outcomes; unfortunately, there are discrepancies between the amount prescribed and amount received. The aim of this study was to explore the nutritional clinical practice, determine the adequacy and identify reasons for un...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose of Review Despite the large body of evidence supporting adequate early enteral nutrition (EN) in surgical patients, iatrogenic underfeeding is common. Myths and misconceptions persist and patients may receive suboptimal nutritional therapy as a result of outdated or uninformed practices. EN is safe and potentially beneficial in patients req...
Article
Background: New onset atrial fibrillation (AF) in critically ill surgical patients is associated with significant morbidity and increased mortality. N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is released by cardiomyocytes in response to stress and may predict AF development after surgery. We hypothesized that elevated NT-proBNP level at...
Article
Full-text available
Background: An enterocutaneous fistula (ECF) is an aberrant connection between the gastrointestinal tract and the skin or atmosphere (enteroatmospheric fistula [EAF]). Multimodal treatment includes surgical procedures, nutrition support, and wound care. We evaluated our practice and compared our outcomes with previous results published from our in...
Poster
Full-text available
An enterocutaneous fistula (ECF) is an aberrant connection between the gastrointestinal tract and the skin or atmosphere (EAF). Multimodal treatment includes surgical procedures, nutrition support, and wound care. Previously published series from our institution have described ECF/EAF treatment, and outcomes, though the most recent publication was...
Poster
Full-text available
The enteral nutrition (EN) is the common way to cover the nutrition deficiencies in artificial way. In Mexico, 71% of the patients with EN are underfeeding. Worldwide the protocols for EN support in the ICU improve the adequacy of calories and protein. In Mexico, EN protocols have not been implemented. We hypothesize that the EN protocol implementa...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a measure of the host inflammatory response and higher NLR has been associated with worse clinical outcomes in critically ill patients. Enteral nutrition (EN) may mitigate inflammation through interaction with gut-associated lymphoid tissue, though the influence of EN on NLR and its association with clinical out...
Poster
Full-text available
Obesity (body mass index [BMI] > 30 kg/m2) alone and osteopenia alone have been associated with worse clinical outcomes in hospitalized patients. However, the interaction between the two has not been well-described and it is unknown whether the effects are additive, negative, or synergistic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of obesi...
Article
Background: The success of Closed Chest Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CC-CPR) degrades with prolonged times. Open Chest CPR (OC-CPR) is an alternative that may lead to superior coronary and cerebral perfusion. It is critical to determine when continued CC-CPR is unlikely to be successful to justify initiating OC-CPR as rescue therapy. The purpose...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
Hi to all,
I wonder if there is a way to generate a forest plot in revman using the results of a survey that had ranked answers? Thanks in advance,
Question
Hello to all, im wondering, if that possible to compare one ( median or mean) from  previous results that comes from an article vs. the mean/median from my result, if is that possible, how can i do that ? thanks

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Once again, we’ve systematically reviewed 53 topics on critical care nutrition have posted our updated summaries on our website. We have included all RCTs of nutritional interventions involving critically ill patients examining clinically important outcomes published since 1980. Visit the Critical Care Nutrition website (https://www.criticalcarenutrition.com/systematic-reviews) to access these Systematic Reviews. The included studies have undergone a formal review by our review committee and data have been extracted in duplicate. The updated Systematic reviews are being made available starting in February 2021 and all will hopefully be updated by the end of March 2021. Refer to the topics below for a full list of the topics and for links to the available systematic reviews. We are hoping you find these summaries of evidence updates helpful in your day to day practice. Also, we wanted to offer a thank you to our collaborators who worked on this update. This would not possible without a full team effort. Review Committee: Dr. Daren Heyland, MD Dr Jayshil Patel, MD Dr Aileen Hill, MD Zheng Yii Lee, MSc Cindy Yap, BSc Luis Alfonso Ortiz Reyes, MSc John Clarke, MSc, RKin Rupinder Dhaliwal, RD
Project
We are launching The Journal Club of the Student & Trainee Section of ASPEN. The purpose of this club is to provide a platform for members to share their nutrition research (thesis projects, study designs, or publications) with the clinical nutrition student, trainee community, and TOP researchers worldwide and receive diverse feedback through discussion. If you are interested in participating, please apply for ASPEN membership online (if not currently a member) and then send us an email to laor@queensu.ca (Alfonso Ortiz) with your name, affiliation, and a brief description of your presentation, and we will be in touch with more information. Please feel free to share this with others that would be interested. Sincerely, The Student & Trainee Section Leadership Team
Project
A burning question in today’s clinical practice with critically ill patients is how much protein is required to optimize patient outcomes. Our recent clinical guidelines for critical illness in adults recommend protein doses of 1.2-2.0 g/kg body weight daily. Large observational studies generally support lower mortality with greater protein intake; the few randomized clinical trials are small and inconclusive; but post hoc analyses of randomized trials suggest that more protein may be associated with harm. Hence, there is confusion about the most efficacious dose of protein for these vulnerable patients. ASPEN’s mission is to improve patient care by advancing the science and practice of clinical nutrition and metabolism. Clearly, answering the question of how much protein is best for critically ill patients is consistent with that mission. On that basis, ASPEN has joined Principal Investigator Dr. Daren Heyland in promoting the EFFORT trial to interested members and colleagues. Dr. Heyland is a recognized leader in critical care nutrition research who has launched the EFFORT trial to answer the question of appropriate protein dose. Site participation in the EFFORT trial requires local ethics body approval and data entry by volunteers in global ICUs. Sites in the US may be eligible for waiver of consent (See figure for procedures). Sites will receive a benchmarking report once the trial has ended and steady feedback about their success in attaining goal protein intake. The EFFORT trial includes randomization of individual patients to a protein target of either ≤1.2 g/kg/day or ≥2.2 g/kg/day. Over a period of 3 years, the trial will enroll approximately 4,000 adult patients to answer the question of which of these two common protein doses yields lower 60-day mortality, and secondarily shorter time to discharge alive. By the 2022 ASPEN Nutrition Science & Practice Conference, we hope that the answer to the important question about the optimal protein dose in critically ill patients will be clear. We need your support and participation to make this dream come true. Please check the www.criticalcarenutrition.com website for details. Get involved in enrolling ICU patients to this important trial. Dr. Charlene Compher (compherc@upenn.edu) and Dr. Jayshil Patel (jpatel2@mcw.edu) will be glad to answer your questions. Contact us for more information or if you want to participate Janet Overvelde Project Leader overvelj@kgh.kari.net Alfonso Ortiz Clinical Evaluation Research Unit laor@queensu.ca