Luis Cerezo

Luis Cerezo
American University Washington D.C. | AU · Department of World Languages & Cultures

Ph.D.

About

14
Publications
18,947
Reads
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100
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Introduction
Luis Cerezo is an Associate Professor and Director of the Spanish Language Program at American University. His research focuses on language learning with technology — especially video games —, translation pedagogy, and language and identity. He designed Talking to Avatars, a simulation that allows learners to interact with pre-filmed actors to complete real-life tasks. Personal website: www.luiscerezophd.com
Additional affiliations
September 2017 - present
American University Washington D.C.
Position
  • Managing Director
September 2011 - February 2016
American University Washington D.C.
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
September 2011 - February 2016
American University Washington D.C.
Position
  • Assistant Professor, Applied Linguistics / Director, Spanish Language Program

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Meta-analytic research suggests an edge of explicit over implicit instruction for the development of complex L2 grammatical structures, but the jury is still out as to which type of explicit instruction—deductive or inductive , where rules are respectively provided or elicited—proves more effective. Avoiding this dichotomy, accumulating research sh...
Article
Full-text available
Rooted in socio-constructivism, the present article investigates the effects of type of collaborative translation on Spanish L2 development, triangulating data from task performance, learning outcomes, and learners’ perceptions. Thirteen dyads of college students participated in a within-subjects repeated-measures experimental study, translating au...
Chapter
Full-text available
Despite the current curricular push for hybridization in language programs, research on ISLA provides little guidance as to what and how syllabus content can be migrated online. Cerezo, Caras, and Leow (2016) recently showed that videogames using guided induction (GI) can successfully promote robust learning outcomes and deep processing of a comple...
Chapter
Full-text available
The empirical literature on computer assisted language learning (CALL) has historically progressed from quantitative comparisons of CALL/non-CALL conditions to mixed methods designs that seek to answer more complex questions , including why technology may facilitate learning – a question that invokes the use of a theoretical paradigm. Investigating...
Chapter
Full-text available
Since its origins, the field of Interpreting Studies has undergone exciting transformations, building upon linguistic, cognitive, and sociocultural frameworks, and using a multiplicity of quantitative and qualitative research designs. This chapter discusses the past, present, and future of interpreting research, worldwide and in the Hispanic contex...
Article
Full-text available
Instructed second language acquisition (ISLA) has been referenced in the larger field of the SLA literature for over two and a half decades. Currently, there are several theoretical underpinnings accounting for processes assumed to play a role in ISLA and quite an impressive number of studies have empirically addressed some aspect(s) of ISLA. Recen...
Article
Full-text available
Research shows that computer-generated corrective feedback can promote second language development, but there is no consensus about which type is the most effective. The scale is tipped in favor of more explicit feedback that provides metalinguistic explanations, but counterevidence indicates that minimally explicit feedback of the right/wrong type...
Chapter
Full-text available
Since the 1980s, researchers and practitioners in the field of second language acquisition (SLA) have progressively embraced the psycholinguistically-motivated methodological principles of task-based language teaching (TBLT). The field of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) has been no exception, and educational resources have gradually evol...
Book
Full-text available
The use of technology for second language learning is ever more present. This book offers a unique four-prong approach (theoretical, methodological, empirical, and pedagogical) to current and prospective uses of technology in L2 learning from a psycholinguistic perspective. It is accessible to teachers, graduate students, and professors of all disc...
Article
Full-text available
Currently, an increasing number of educational institutions are redefining second/foreign language (L2) classrooms by enhancing – or even replacing – traditional face-to-face (FTF) instruction with computer-assisted language learning (CALL). However, are these curricular decisions supported by research? Overall, a cursory review of empirical studie...

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