Ludo Block

Ludo Block
Leiden University | LEI · Institure for Security and Global Affairs

PhD

About

18
Publications
12,835
Reads
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149
Citations
Citations since 2017
3 Research Items
83 Citations
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Introduction
Lecturer at the Institute of Security and Global Affairs of Leiden University, focussing on Intelligence, Structured Analytic Techniques, OSINT, security cooperation and public-private cooperation.

Publications

Publications (18)
Chapter
Full-text available
The article (in Dutch) provides an overview and analysis of the oversight of private investigators in the Netherlands. Performing private investigations in the Netherlands is since 1993 subject to licensing by the Ministry of Justice while the police is tasked with the oversight of the practices of private investigators. The article details the his...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter examines the area of police cooperation, where the impact of political tensions between Russia and the EU has been somewhat more limited. Since 2014, law-enforcement cooperation between Russia and EU member states has decreased, but the level of interdependence and effectiveness of cooperation was always low. The law-enforcement agenci...
Chapter
Full-text available
While ‘more police cooperation’ has long been the European Union (EU) policy-makers’ mantra, the new buzzword today seems to be ‘trust’. Trust is seen by the European Commission as one of three key elements – the others being ‘tools’ and ‘training’ – in European police cooperation, and as a commodity that can be ‘built’ and ‘promoted’. Another illu...
Book
Full-text available
This book presents rich and illustrative empirical material on the use of liaison offices in police cooperation. The authors, both eminent academics and seasoned practitioners (and in some cases from a dual academic-practitioner background), present their findings from a wide range of geographical and functional viewpoints. Students and law enforce...
Article
Full-text available
It is frequently claimed that the extent of police cooperation in Europe is insufficient. To which extent such claims are justified is however unclear as most appear to be based on anecdotic evidence and systematic evaluations of police cooperation are scarce. With the aim to provide better understanding of international police cooperation in comba...
Article
Full-text available
In this article contemporary practices of police cooperation between the (Member States of the) European Union and the Russian Federation are considered. Starting with a depiction of EU-RF police cooperation through Interpol and Europol the article continues with specific attention for the role of police liaison officers and the daily practice of o...
Article
Full-text available
In the past decade one of the most promoted EU initiatives for fighting organised crime has been the so-called Joint Investigation Teams (JIT). Originally introduced in the EU Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty of 2000 for most member states the legal basis to establish JITs became available in 2004. However, in spite of the strong political push behin...
Article
Full-text available
The academic literature in the field of cross-border policing tends to concentrate exclusively on the high-level crimes – drug trafficking, terrorism, and human trafficking – that are so often the focus of transnational police co-operation in criminal investigations. There are, however, many other types of transnational crime, including the of-ten...
Article
Full-text available
Since 1997 there exists strong political will in the European Union (EU) to use Joint Investigation Teams (JITs) to foster police cooperation in criminal investigations. For most member states the legal basis to establish JITs became available in 2004. However, as yet, only around 30 JITs have been established. This chapter investigates the gap bet...
Article
Full-text available
Police from the European Union (EU) Member States make significant use of bilateral liaison officers to cooperate with police in other countries. In the past decades, a number of TREVI and EU Council policy instruments have aimed to enhance the common use of liaison officers by the Member States. This research article discusses these policy instrum...
Article
Full-text available
This book chapter describes and analyses the practicalities and issues of cross-border liaison and intelligence alongside a case study of European law enforcement liaison officers stationed in the Russian Federation. It proceeds from a functional perspective on criminal intelligence which is understood to be 'information that enables law enforcemen...
Article
Full-text available
Ludo Block is a former Dutch police officer who from 1999 till 2004 served as the police liaison officer for the Dutch National Police Agency in Moscow. In this article he responds to claims that the extent of police cooperation in Europe is insufficient, stating that the extent to which such claims are justified is unclear, as most appear to be ba...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, contemporary practices of police co-operation between the (Member States of the) European Union (EU) and the Russian Federation (RF) are considered. Starting with a depiction of EU-RF police co-operation through Interpol and Europol, the article continues with specific attention to the role of police liaison officers and the daily...
Article
In the past decade police cooperation in the European Union (EU) has been based on state-centrism cultivating the establishment of national coordination mechanisms within the states. Recent developments, however, point to an increasing importance of decentralised practices and arrangements for European police cooperation. In addition, developments...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Identifying the exploitation of open sources for intelligence purposes throughout time. While most authors take the establsihment BBC Monitoring Service (1939) and FBIS (1941) as the starting point of the use op 'open source intelligence', there is ample data suggesting that pratices of exploitation of open sources can be traced much further back in time. Side goal is tracing the ever-shifting definition of OSINT
Archived project
Project
The aim is to identify what makes and breaks trust in different kinds of security cooperation (e.g. policing, intelligence, private security). Trust as a factor is often mentioned though seldom explained or defined.