Lucy Delap

Lucy Delap
University of Cambridge | Cam · Faculty of History

About

41
Publications
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237
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Introduction
I am a historian of modern Britain with a particular focus on gender history, labour history and the history of feminisms. I'm based at the History Faculty, University of Cambridge, and have just completed a Pelican introduction to the history of modern feminisms in global perspective.

Publications

Publications (41)
Article
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Historians of the Women’s Liberation Movement have long stressed its decentralized form, with a deliberate refusal of the infrastructure of leaders and formal institutions. Instead, like other social movements of the 1970s and 80 s, periodicals, networks of friends, and informal meeting places tended to provide the impetus for the development and d...
Chapter
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This chapter situates the ‘woman question’ as an expansive and flourishing set of debates within political, literary and social thought in the nineteenth century. These debates represented an interrogation of the basic components of liberal and republican political argument-citizenship, property, access to the public sphere and political virtue. To...
Article
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For those who by the end of the twentieth century came to be termed “survivors” of child sexual abuse, different genres and forms have been available to narrate and evaluate that abuse. This article explores the reception and practical results of such disclosures: the unpredictable effects of telling, and the strategies of containment, silencing, o...
Research
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The research on which this report is based was commissioned by the Historical Child Abuse Team of HM Prison & Probation Service (HMPPS), to inform its response to the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA). Its aim was to enhance HMPPS’s own institutional memory, and to suggest avenues for improved practice in safeguarding children in...
Article
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Article
Feminism posed powerful political and emotional challenges to progressive men in the 1970s and 1980s. This article investigates politically and personally motivated attempts to ‘feel differently’ by men in Britain who identified as ‘anti-sexist’ and aligned themselves with the Women’s Liberation Movement. This rescripting of emotions was a central...
Article
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This article reflects on methodological and ethical issues that have shaped a collaborative project which aims to chart social, legal and political responses to child sexual abuse in England and Wales across the twentieth century. The etymological problem of searching for child sexual abuse in the historical archive is discussed, given that the ter...
Chapter
Genius in its nineteenth-and twentieth-century formations has powerful connotations of elitism, and is likely to have boundaries that exclude the socially marginalized or disempowered. It was a common assumption in Victorian and Edwardian Britain that women were by nature unlikely to display genius. Nonetheless, “genius” proved a captivating and, o...
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In this article, we examine the experience of History 8c Policy, (www.his- toryandpolicy.org), an organisation set up a decade ago in Britain to enable insights from academic historians to inform policymaking processes. We firstly address the manner in which historians can contribute to 'evidence-based' policymaking, both as providers of historical...
Article
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A 1912 tribute to W. T. Stead in the 'Contemporary Review' claimed that ‘he lay outside conventional movements, and was singularly detached from normal currents of political influence. He did not belong to anybody.’ Not only was this true across the range of reforms and causes Stead expressed support for, but also in more specific contexts. As a ch...
Chapter
In February 1957, the St James’ branch of the Church of England Men’s Society (CEMS) met in Bolton to discuss what one member described as ‘the great picture by Holman Hunt “THE SHADOW OF DEATH”’.1 Hunt had depicted Jesus as a muscular craftsman in the early 1870s, and nearly a century later his image was still resonating with this body of provinci...
Chapter
Men, Masculinities and Religious Change in Twentieth-Century Britain investigates the influence of religion on the formation of men as gendered and sexual beings. It surveys a geographical and historical period — twentieth-century Britain — which has witnessed profound changes in both religious cultures and the gender order. This is a century which...
Chapter
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Article
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This article sets established historical narratives of a mid-twentieth-century turn to privacy, new domestic identities, and new ways of thinking about housework into a broader history of domestic service. I argue that the new forms of domesticity were only ever partially and unevenly established in middle-class households. Domestic service emerges...
Article
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The relationships of physical and emotional labour which exist between children, parents and domestic workers are historically fluid. Different styles of parenting, discourses of social class, and material contexts of care have given rise to very diverse degrees of delegation of childcare to servants. Servants themselves have often invested emotion...
Article
This book tells the story of lives and labour within twentieth-century British homes. From great houses to suburbs and slums, it charts the interactions of servants and employers and the intense controversies and emotions they inspired. Historians have seen domestic service as an obsolete or redundant sector from the middle of the twentieth century...
Chapter
The late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries saw significant change in the ‘public conversation’ about women’s rights and freedoms. The tendency to measure progress and changes in public opinion through the daily press and through the pages of their own periodicals stems back to the impact Bessie Rayner Parkes attributed to the English Woman’s...
Chapter
Votes for Women, the Englishwoman, and the Freewoman were only three divergent examples of the wide range of feminist periodicals published between the end of the nineteenth century and the interwar years in Britain.1 While a growing body of scholarship dealing with feminist print media in the period has emerged in recent years, it is remarkable th...
Book
Highlighting the contributions of feminist media history to media studies and related disciplines, this book focuses on feminist periodicals emerging from or reacting to the Edwardian suffrage campaign and situates them in the context of current debates about the public sphere, social movements, and media history. © Maria DiCenzo, Lucy Delap and Le...
Article
BinghamAdrian. Family Newspapers? Sex, Private Life and the British Popular Press, 1918–1978. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. Pp. 298. $99.00 (cloth). - Volume 49 Issue 1 - Lucy Delap
Chapter
Beatrice Webb, born in 1858 to a servant-keeping family, recalled her development of consciousness of social station through observing her mother’s exercise of domestic authority. Webb wrote, “As life unfolded I became aware that I belonged to a class of persons who habitually gave orders, but who seldom, if ever, executed the orders of other peopl...
Chapter
R.A. Scott-James’s 1913 analysis of the influence of an ever-proliferating and segmented — but intricately interwoven — newspaper and periodical press offers a useful point of departure for understanding the highly self-conscious debates about print culture in the late nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries, as well as the complexities facing res...
Chapter
In this chapter, the early twentieth-century formulations of ‘feminism’ are explored, as an identity developed in active defiance of ‘suffragism’. While some suffragists later came to identify as feminists, for a brief period feminism provided an intellectual and political space for a very different kind of Edwardian politics, heavily influenced by...
Article
The Freewoman has commonly been read as an example of New Woman periodical publishing, through its focus on women's sexuality and autonomy from men. The journal appears to offer a more daring, twentieth-century and modern ‘new woman’, more willing than even her 1890s counterpart to embrace free unions or sexual experimentation. The Freewoman's extr...
Article
The nineteenth and twentieth centuries witnessed women's claims to political, cultural and social rights and agency, as well as the growth of imperial and anti-imperial nationalisms within the metropole and colonial locations. This article draws on three case studies, the black nationalist journalism of the 1830s in the United States, the black abo...
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This paper critically examines the nineteenth- and early twentieth-century revival of chivalry in Britain, with a particular emphasis on chivalry at sea. It gives a history to the so-called 'eternal law of the sea', the chivalric code of 'women and children first' during shipwrecks. For most of the nineteenth century, chivalry at sea had been organ...
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This article highlights anti-feminism as a neglected source in British debates about gender in the early twentieth century. It examines Edwardian feminism and anti-feminism within the ‘little magazines’ of ‘advanced’ or modernist circles, and explores the lack of conceptual distinctness of thinkers who identified themselves, or have been subsequent...
Article
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This article examines the development of the idea of the ‘superwoman’ among British Edwardian feminists and contextualizes it within the aristocratic political thought of the day. I examine the idea of the ‘genius’ and the ‘superman’ in order to shed light on why, for some Edwardian feminists, the ideal feminist agent was to be an elite, discerning...

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