Lucy Cheke

Lucy Cheke
University of Cambridge | Cam · Department of Psychology

About

52
Publications
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1,676
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Publications

Publications (52)
Article
Full-text available
COVID-19, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has been often characterized as a respiratory disease. However, it is increasingly being understood as an infection that impacts multiple systems, and many patients report neurological symptoms. Indeed, there is accumulating evidence for neural damage in some individu...
Article
Full-text available
Since its first emergence in December 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has evolved into a global pandemic. Whilst often considered a respiratory disease, a large proportion of COVID-19 patients report neurological symptoms, and there is accumulating evidence for neura...
Article
This paper reviews evidence demonstrating a bidirectional relationship between memory and eating in humans and rodents. In humans, amnesia is associated with impaired processing of hunger and satiety cues, disrupted memory of recent meals, and overconsumption. In healthy participants, meal-related memory limits subsequent ingestive behavior and obe...
Article
Key areas of the episodic memory (EM) network demonstrate changing structure and volume during adolescence. EM is multifaceted and yet studies of EM thus far have largely examined single components, used different methods and have unsurprisingly yielded inconsistent results. The Treasure Hunt task is a single paradigm that allows parallel investiga...
Article
Episodic memory (EM) is a subsystem responsible for storing and evoking information about the “What”, “Where” and “When” elements of an event in an integrated way. This capacity depends of structures with hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. The effect of aging on some capacities mediated by these areas, such as the influence of the number of objects...
Article
Full-text available
Humans use a variety of cues to infer an object's weight, including how easily objects can be moved. For example, if we observe an object being blown down the street by the wind, we can infer that it is light. Here, we tested whether New Caledonian crows make this type of inference. After training that only one type of object (either light or heavy...
Article
Full-text available
Considerable recent evidence indicates that angular gyrus dysfunction in humans does not result in amnesia, but does impair a number of aspects of episodic memory. Patients with parietal lobe lesions have been reported to exhibit a deficit when freely recalling autobiographical events from their pasts, but can remember details of the events when re...
Preprint
Full-text available
Considerable recent evidence indicates that angular gyrus dysfunction does not result in amnesia, but does impair a number of aspects of episodic memory. Patients with parietal lobe lesions have been reported to exhibit a deficit when freely recalling autobiographical events from their pasts, but can remember details of the events when recall is cu...
Article
Full-text available
Scientific Reports 7 : Article number: 40062 10.1038/srep40062 ; published online: 05 January 2017 ; updated: 24 February 2017 This Article contains an error in the Methods section under the subheading ‘Subjects’: “Eurasian jays participated in the study (though see results for samples sizes for each test condition)”.
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge about the causal relationship between objects has been studied extensively in human infants, and more recently in adult animals using differential looking time experiments. How knowledge about object support develops in non-human animals has yet to be explored. Here, we studied the ontogeny of support relations in Eurasian jays (Garrulus...
Article
Increasing research in animals and humans suggests that obesity may be associated with learning and memory deficits, and in particular with reductions in episodic memory. Rodent models have implicated the hippocampus in obesity-related memory impairments, but the neural mechanisms underlying episodic memory deficits in obese humans remain undetermi...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing research in animals and humans suggests that obesity may be associated with learning and memory deficits, and in particular with reductions in episodic memory. Rodent models have implicated the hippocampus in obesity-related memory impairments, but the neural mechanisms underlying episodic memory deficits in obese humans remain undetermi...
Article
Knowledge about the causal relationship between objects has been studied extensively in human infants, and more recently in adult animals using differential looking time experiments. How knowledge about object support develops in non-human animals has yet to be explored. Here, we studied the ontogeny of support relations in Eurasian jays ($\textit{...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to reason about causality underlies key aspects of human cognition, but the extent to which non-humans understand causality is still largely unknown. The Aesop’s Fable paradigm, where objects are inserted into water-filled tubes to obtain out-of-reach rewards, has been used to test casual reasoning in birds and children. However, succes...
Data
Children Experiment 1A results per age group and test group. Group 1: initial preference for sinking objects and Group 2: trained preference for floating object. (PDF)
Data
Crow trial-by-trial performance. (XLSX)
Data
Children Experiment 1B results per age group and test group. Group 1: initial preference for hollow objects and Group 2: no post-test object preference. (PDF)
Data
Child selection trial-by-trial performance. (XLSX)
Data
Sand vs. water task crow results: number of object insertions into correct tube (i.e. water-filled tube). One bird (‘Nero’) required a second block of 10 trials as did not reach significance in block 1. Significant p-values highlighted in bold. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
The ability to reason about causality underlies key aspects of human cognition, but the extent to which non-humans understand causality is still largely unknown. The Aesop's Fable paradigm, where objects are inserted into water-filled tubes to obtain out-of-reach rewards, has been used to test casual reasoning in birds and children. However, succes...
Article
Full-text available
String-pulling is a widely used paradigm in animal cognition research to assess what animals understand about the functionality of strings as a means to obtain an out-of-reach reward. This study aimed to systematically investigate what rules Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) use to solve different patterned string tasks, i.e. tasks in whi...
Article
Full-text available
Older adults exhibit disproportionate impairments in memory for item-associations. These impairments may stem from an inability to self-initiate deep encoding strategies. The present study investigates this using the "treasure-hunt task"; a what- where-when style episodic memory test that requires individuals to "hide" items around complex scenes....
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, we have investigated the possibility that Eurasian jay food sharing might rely on desire-state attribution. The female's desire for a particular type of food can be decreased by sating her on it (specific satiety) and the food sharing paradigm can be used to test whether the male's sharing pattern reflects the female's current desi...
Data
The ability to reason about causality underlies key aspects of human cognition, but the extent to which non-humans understand causality is still largely unknown. The Aesop’s Fable paradigm, where objects are inserted into water-filled tubes to obtain out-of-reach rewards, has been used to test casual reasoning in birds and children. However, succes...
Article
Full-text available
Obesity has become an international health crisis. There is accumulating evidence that excess bodyweight is associated with changes to the structure and function of the brain and with a number of cognitive deficits. In particular, research suggests that obesity is associated with hippocampal and frontal lobe dysfunction, which would be predicted to...
Article
Obesity has become an international health crisis. There is accumulating evidence that excess bodyweight is associated with changes to the structure and function of the brain and with a number of cognitive deficits. In particular, research suggests that obesity is associated with hippocampal and frontal lobe dysfunction, which would be predicted to...
Article
Full-text available
Jacobs et al. [[1][1]] raise some interesting and important questions about our recent paper in which New Caledonian crows were unable to design a novel causal intervention [[2][2]]. These concern the problematic nature of animal/human comparisons, the complexity of our apparatus, other evidence
Article
Full-text available
The development of episodic memory in children has been of interest to researchers for more than a century. Current behavioral tests that have been developed to assess episodic memory differ substantially in their surface features. Therefore, it is possible that these tests are assessing different memory processes. In this study, 106 children aged...
Article
Full-text available
Humans are capable of simply observing a correlation between cause and effect, and then producing a novel behavioural pattern in order to recreate the same outcome. However, it is unclear how the ability to create such causal interventions evolved. Here, we show that while 24-month-old children can produce an effective, novel action after observing...
Article
Full-text available
Cognition presents evolutionary research with one of its greatest challenges. Cognitive evolution has been explained at the proximate level by shifts in absolute and relative brain volume and at the ultimate level by differences in social and dietary complexity. However, no study has integrated the experimental and phylogenetic approach at the scal...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding causal regularities in the world is a key feature of human cognition. However, the extent to which non-human animals are capable of causal understanding is not well understood. Here, we used the Aesop's fable paradigm - in which subjects drop stones into water to raise the water level and obtain an out of reach reward - to assess New...
Article
Full-text available
Humans' predictions of another person's behaviour are regularly influenced by what they themselves might know or want. In a previous study, we found that male Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) could cater for their female partner's current desire when sharing food with her. Here, we tested the extent to which the males' decisions are influenced b...
Article
Full-text available
A number of different philosophical, theoretical, and empirical perspectives on episodic memory have led to the development of very different tests with which to assess it. Although these tests putatively assess the same psychological capacity, they have rarely been directly compared. Here, a sample of undergraduates was tested on three different p...
Article
State-attribution is the ability to ascribe to others an internal life like one's own and to understand that internal, psychological states such as desire, hope, belief, and knowledge underlie others' actions. Despite extensive research, comparative studies struggle to adequately integrate key factors of state-attribution that have been identified...
Article
Full-text available
Episodic Cognition (or “Mental Time Travel”) is the ability to mentally re-experience events from our personal past and imagine potential events from our personal future. This capacity is fundamental to our lives and has been argued to be uniquely human. The aim of this thesis is to use behavioural tasks developed in comparative cognition to integr...
Article
Full-text available
The opioid system is implicated in the hedonic and motivational processing of food, and in binge eating, a behaviour strongly linked to obesity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of 4 weeks of treatment with the mu-opioid receptor antagonist GSK1521498 on eating behaviour in binge-eating obese subjects. Adults with body mass index ...
Article
Full-text available
Studies on members of the crow family using the "Aesop's Fable" paradigm have revealed remarkable abilities in these birds, and suggested a mechanism by which associative learning and folk physics may interact when learning new problems. In the present study, children between 4 and 10 years of age were tested on the same tasks as the birds. Overall...
Data
Token Retrieval. The success in retrieving the token was recorded. The purpose of the study was to report on the learning process and on whether children learned to perform and repeat the effective action over the ineffective action. The number of effective actions performed was thus the variable studied. The success at retrieving the token is a fa...
Article
Full-text available
Western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) have been shown to overcome present satiety to cache food they will desire in the future. Here, we show that another corvid, the Eurasian jay (Garrulus glandarius), can distinguish between two distinct future desires and plan for each appropriately, despite experiencing a conflicting current motivation. W...
Article
We analyze theoretical differences between conceptualist and minimalist approaches to episodic processing in young children. The ‘episodic-like’ minimalism of Clayton and Dickinson (1998) is a species of the latter. We asked whether an ‘episodic-like’ task (structurally similar to ones used by Clayton and Dickinson) in which participants had to bin...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research with Rooks has demonstrated impressive tool-using abilities in captivity despite this species’ classification as a non-tool-user in the wild. Here, we explored whether another non-tool-using corvid, the Eurasian Jay, would be capable of similar feats and investigated the relative contributions of causal knowledge and instrumental co...
Chapter
Full-text available
To date there is considerable divergence between different literatures concerning future-orientated cognition, particularly between researchers studying human and animal subjects. Much of the animal literature is concerned with finding evidence for the presence or absence of particular forms of prospective cognition. The human literature has, on th...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research with Rooks has demonstrated impressive tool-using abilities in captivity despite this species’ classification as a non-tool-user in the wild. Here, we explored whether another non-tool-using corvid, the Eurasian Jay, would be capable of similar feats and investigated the relative contributions of causal knowledge and instrumental co...
Article
Twelve years on from Suddendorf and Corballis's mental time travel (MTT) hypothesis, the debate as to whether episodic cognition is unique to humans remains unresolved. In this article, we review the evidence for mental time travel in nonhuman animals and the empirical methods used in this field. Investigation of episodic-like memory has been domin...

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Projects (2)
Project
The aim of the project is to uncover the mechanism(s) by which corvids respond to others' desires in different context such as caching or food-sharing.