Lucie Ménard

Lucie Ménard
Université du Québec à Montréal | UQAM

About

184
Publications
23,835
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1,998
Citations
Citations since 2017
42 Research Items
997 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (184)
Article
No PDF available ABSTRACT Previous studies on multimodal integration in speech perception have found that not only auditory and visual cues, but also tactical sensation—such as an air-puff on skin that simulates aspiration—can be integrated in the perception of speech sounds (Gick & Derrick, 2009). However, most previous investigations have been co...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose It is well known that speech uses both the auditory and visual modalities to convey information. In cases of congenital sensory deprivation, the feedback language learners have access to for mapping visible and invisible orofacial articulation is impoverished. Although the effects of blindness on the movements of the lips, jaw, and tongue h...
Article
No PDF available ABSTRACT Ultrasound tongue imaging has shown potential for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to evaluate and treat persistent articulatory disorders. However, SLPs typically begin with low to no familiarity with ultrasound. Thus, this study investigated an important aspect of ultrasound device usability: learnability for SLPs. Th...
Article
Full-text available
Audiovisual interaction in speech perception is well defined in adults. Despite the large body of evidence suggesting that children are also sensitive to visual input, very few empirical studies have been conducted. To further investigate whether visual inputs influence auditory perception of phonemes in preschoolers in the same way as in adults, w...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose Current models of speech development argue for an early link between speech production and perception in infants. Recent data show that young infants (at 4–6 months) preferentially attend to speech sounds (vowels) with infant vocal properties compared to those with adult vocal properties, suggesting the presence of special “memory banks” fo...
Article
No PDF available ABSTRACT Ultrasound imaging is a helpful tool to observe tongue movements without interfering with natural speech. There exist a variety of models to quantify tongue shape based on contours extracted from ultrasound images. However, these can be affected by poor image quality, e.g., when parts of the tongue are missing from the ima...
Article
No PDF available ABSTRACT Ultrasound tongue imaging has shown potential for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to evaluate and treat persistent articulatory disorders. However, SLPs typically begin with low to no familiarity with ultrasound. Thus, this study investigated an important aspect of ultrasound device usability: learnability for SLPs. Th...
Article
Full-text available
The present investigation examined the extent to which asymmetries in vowel perception derive from a sensitivity to focalization (formant proximity), stimulus prototypicality, or both. English-speaking adults identified, rated, and discriminated a vowel series that spanned a less-focal/prototypic English /u/ and a more-focal/prototypic French /u/ e...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the development of spoken language in young children has become increasingly important for advancing basic theories of language acquisition and for clinical practice. However, such a goal requires refined measurements of speech articulation (e.g., from the tongue), which are difficult to obtain from young children. In recent years tho...
Article
Full-text available
The development of speech from infancy to adulthood results from the interaction of neurocognitive factors, by which phonological representations and motor control abilities are gradually acquired, and physical factors, involving the complex changes in the morphology of the articulatory system. In this article, an articulatory-to-acoustic model, in...
Article
Objective We aimed to investigate the production of contrastive emphasis in French-speaking 4-year-olds and adults. Based on previous work, we predicted that, due to their immature motor control abilities, preschool-aged children would produce smaller articulatory differences between emphasized and neutral syllables than adults. Method Ten 4-year-...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the role of motor control immaturity in the speech production characteristics of 4-year-old children, compared to adults. Specifically, two indices were examined: trial-to-trial variability, which is assumed to be linked to motor control accuracy, and anticipatory extra-syllabic vowel-to-vowel coarticulation, wh...
Article
Speech perception relies on auditory and visual cues and there are strong links between speech perception and production. We aimed to evaluate the role of auditory and visual modalities on speech perception and production in adults with impaired hearing or sight versus those with normal hearing and sight. We examined speech perception and productio...
Article
Full-text available
Talkers have been shown to adapt the production of multiple vowel sounds simultaneously in response to altered auditory feedback. The present study extends this work by exploring the adaptation of speech production to a physical alteration of the vocal tract involving a palatal prosthesis that impacts both somatosensory and auditory feedback during...
Article
Full-text available
Recent articles on primate articulatory abilities are revolutionary regarding speech emergence, a crucial aspect of language evolution, by revealing a human-like system of proto-vowels in nonhuman primates and implicitly throughout our hominid ancestry. This article presents both a schematic history and the state of the art in primate vocalization...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the development of spoken language in young children has become increasingly important for advancing basic theories of language acquisition and for clinical practice. However, such a goal requires refined measurements of speech articulation (e.g., from the tongue), which are difficult to obtain from young children. In recent years tho...
Article
Full-text available
Multisensory integration (MSI) allows us to link sensory cues from multiple sources and plays a crucial role in speech development. However, it is not clear whether humans have an innate ability or whether repeated sensory input while the brain is maturing leads to efficient integration of sensory information in speech. We investigated the integrat...
Article
No PDF available ABSTRACT Myotonic dystrophy, a neurodegenerative disease that causes muscle weakness and difficulties in muscle relaxation after contraction, frequently affects orofacial articulatory dynamics leading to decreased speech intelligibility, particularly in children. We aimed to investigate the effects of myotonic dystrophy on sensorim...
Article
No PDF available ABSTRACT Vowel discrimination is often asymmetric such that discriminating the same vowel pair is easier in one direction compared to the opposite direction. The Natural Referent Vowel framework interprets these directional asymmetries as a universal bias favoring “focal” vowels (i.e., vowels with prominent spectral peaks formed by...
Preprint
Reading acquisition is strongly intertwined with phoneme awareness that relies on implicit phoneme representations. We asked whether phoneme representations emerge before literacy. We recruited two groups of children, 4 to 5-year-old preschoolers (N = 29) and 7 to 8-year-old schoolchildren (N = 24), whose phonological awareness was evaluated, and o...
Article
Tracking the tongue in ultrasound images provides information about its shape and kinematics during speech. Current methods for detecting/tracking the tongue require manual initialization or training using large amounts of labeled images. In this article, we propose a solution to convert a semi-automatic tongue contour tracking system to a fully-au...
Article
Cross-language speech perception experiments indicate that for many vowel contrasts, discrimination is easier when the same pair of vowels is presented in one direction compared to the reverse direction. According to one account, these directional asymmetries reflect a universal bias favoring “focal” vowels (i.e., vowels with prominent spectral pea...
Article
Full-text available
The current study aimed to better understand the development of prosody perception, by investigating the audiovisual, audio, and visual perception of contrastive focus in French-speaking adults and children. Specifically, 20 adults and 20 school-aged children were presented with short sentences in audiovisual, audio, and visual modalities and were...
Article
Tracking the tongue in ultrasound images provides information about its shape and kinematics during speech. Current methods for detecting/tracking the tongue require manual initialization or training using large amounts of labeled images. This work introduces a new method for extracting tongue contours in ultrasound images that requires no training...
Article
Full-text available
Competent speakers demonstrate a high degree of precision in speech production, but also considerable plasticity in speech motor patterns in the attainment of speech goals. This plasticity is evident through adaptation to sensory perturbations, including physical manipulations that alter both auditory and somatosensory feedbacks. One such manipulat...
Poster
Formant frequency convergence (or “focalization”) and linguistic experience interact to shape the perception of vowels in adulthood. Here, we provide evidence of the effects of formant proximities and language experience at subcortical levels of the auditory pathway. Using a passive oddball/reversed oddball paradigm, the frequency-following respons...
Article
This study investigates the hypothesis that speakers make active use of the visual modality in production to improve their speech intelligibility in noisy conditions. Six native speakers of Canadian French produced speech in quiet conditions and in 85 dB of babble noise, in three situations: interacting face-to-face with the experimenter (AV), usin...
Article
It is well known that congenitally blind adults have enhanced auditory processing for some tasks. For instance, they show supra-normal capacity to perceive accelerated speech. However, only a few studies have investigated basic auditory processing in this population. In this study, we investigated if pitch processing enhancement in the blind is a d...
Article
Masapollo, Polka, and Ménard (2017) recently reported a robust directional asymmetry in unimodal visual vowel perception: Adult perceivers discriminate a change from an English /u/ viseme to a French /u/ viseme significantly better than a change in the reverse direction. This asymmetry replicates a frequent pattern found in unimodal auditory vowel...
Article
Masapollo, Polka, and Ménard (2017) recently reported a robust directional asymmetry in visual vowel perception: perceivers discriminated a change from an English /u/ viseme to a French /u/ viseme significantly better than a change in the reverse direction. This asymmetry parallels a frequent pattern in auditory vowel perception that points to a un...
Conference Paper
Speech production displays a number of idiosyncrasies that are individual variations in the way speakers achieve phonetic contrasts in their language. It was shown previously [L. Ménard, J.-L. Schwartz, J. Aubin, Sp. Comm., 50 (1), 14-28] that idiosyncrasies in the production of the height contrast in oral vowels in French are characterized by larg...
Article
Speech perceivers are universally biased toward “focal” vowels (i.e., vowels whose adjacent formants are close in frequency, which concentrates acoustic energy into a narrower spectral region). This bias is demonstrated in phonetic discrimination tasks as a directional asymmetry: a change from a relatively less to a relatively more focal vowel resu...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Learning to speak involves control of the oro-facial articulators, as well as the construction of relationships between motor commands and auditory and somatosensory sensations. The main goal of this study is to further investigate the hypothesis that differences in speech production between children and adults can be explained on the basis of spee...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the effects of visual deprivation on the relationship between speech perception and production by examining compensatory responses to real-time perturbations in auditory feedback. Specifically, acoustic and articulatory data were recorded while sighted and congenitally blind French speakers produced several repetitions of th...
Article
In child cochlear implant (CI) users, early implantation generally results in highly intelligible speech. However, for some children developing a high level of speech intelligibility may be problematic. Studies of speech production in CI users have principally been based on perceptual judgment and acoustic measures. Articulatory measures, such as t...
Article
Speech production displays a number of idiosyncrasies that are individual variations in the way speakers achieve phonetic contrasts in their language. It was shown previously [Ménard L. et al., Speech Commun. 2008, 50(1), 14-28] that idiosyncrasies in the production of the height contrast in oral vowels in French are characterized by large variatio...
Article
Speech production entails appropriately timed contractions of many muscles. Steinert myotonic dystrophy, a neurodegenerative disease that causes muscle weakness and difficulties in muscle relaxation after muscle contraction, frequently affects orofacial articulatory dynamics leading to decreased speech intelligibility. We aimed to investigate the a...
Article
Masapollo, Polka, and Ménard (2016) have recently reported that adults show robust directional asymmetries in unimodal visual-only vowel discrimination: a change from a relatively less to a relatively more peripheral vowel (in F1-F2 articulatory vowel space) results in significantly better performance than a change in the reverse direction. In the...
Article
The acquisition of speech perception skills is challenging for children. Although some studies have shown that categorical perception boundaries become steeper during childhood and are sometimes shifted in children compared to adults, very few experiments on discrimination abilities in children have been conducted. To investigate this, we conducted...
Article
Research on cross-language vowel perception in both infants and adults has shown that for many vowelcontrasts, discrimination is easier when the same pair of vowels is presented in one direction compared to the reverse direction. According to one account, these directional asymmetries reflect a universal bias favoring “focal” vowels (i.e., vowels w...
Presentation
Full-text available
Contexte de recherche : L’acquisition de la parole en L2 chez les apprenants tardifs soulève toujours des questions sur le niveau ultime de leur compétence communicative en L2, lequel est bien associé à l’accent étranger. La perception de l’accent étranger en L2 se fait généralement par les jugements perceptifs des locuteurs natifs (Flege et coll....
Article
Full-text available
Compared to conversational speech, clear speech is produced with longer vowel duration, greater intensity, increased contrasts between vowel categories, and decreased dispersion within vowel categories. Those acoustic correlates are produced by larger movements of the orofacial articulators, including visible (lips) and invisible (tongue) articulat...
Article
The nature of the speech goal in children was investigated in a study of compensation strategies for a lip-tube perturbation. Acoustic, articulatory, and perceptual analyses of the vowels /y/ and /u/ produced by ten 4-year-old French speakers and ten adult French speakers were conducted under two conditions: normal and with a large tube inserted be...
Article
According to Perkell’s view [J. Perkell, J. Neurol. 25, 382–407], phonemic goals correspond to multidimensional spaces in the auditory and somatosensory dimensions. The relationships between sensory goals and motor actions in speech are acquired during infancy through feedback-based control mechanisms. Although there have been numerous studies of s...
Article
Recent research shows that infants listen preferentially to synthesized vowels that specify an infant source and resonanceproperties over vowels that simulate a adult female (Masapollo et al., 2015). Infants also preferred vowels with infant resonances over vowels with adult vocal resonances when f0 values were matched (210–240 Hz) across resonance...
Article
Recent studies have shown that when producing isolated vowels, congenitally blind speakers produce smaller displacements of the lips (visible articulators), compared with their sighted peers. To investigate the role of visual experience on articulatory gestures used to produce salient speech contrasts, the production of vowels at the edges of low-l...
Article
Research indicates that perceivers (both adult and infant) are universally biased to attend to vowels with extreme articulatory/acoustic properties (peripheral in F1/F2 vowel space). Yet, the nature of this perceptual phenomenon (i.e., the natural referent vowel [NRV] bias) is not fully understood. The present research investigates whether this bia...
Article
Objectives: The effects of increased speaking rates on vowels have been well documented in sighted adults. It has been reported that in fast speech, vowels are less widely spaced acoustically than in their citation form. Vowel space compression has also been reported in congenitally blind speakers. The objective of the study was to investigate the...
Article
Objective: It has been shown previously that congenitally blind francophone adults had higher auditory discrimination scores than sighted adults. It is unclear, however, if, compared to their sighted peers, blind speakers display an increased ability to detect anticipatory acoustic cues. In this paper, this ability is investigated in both speaker...
Article
The impact of congenital visual deprivation on speech production in adults was examined in an ultrasound study of compensation strategies for lip-tube perturbation. Acoustic and articulatory analyses of the rounded vowel /u/ produced by 12 congenitally blind adult French speakers and 11 sighted adult French speakers were conducted under two conditi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study investigates speech motor control in 4-year-old Canadian French children in comparison with adults. It focuses on measures of token-to-token variability in the production of isolated vowels and on anticipatory extra-syllabic coarticulation within V 1-C-V 2 sequences. Acoustic and ultrasound articulatory data were recorded. Acoustic data...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study investigates the process by which young children learn to produce sequences of speech sounds in an adult-like manner. Learning to produce speech sounds requires precise motor control of several oro-facial muscles and the ability to link these motor activations both with articulatory movements in the vocal tract (via somatosensory feedbac...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Contrastive focus serves to emphasize the importance of a semantic unit in the language string. Children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) appear to show difficulties in producing this prosodic marker. This study aimed to identify acoustic correlates related to contrastive focus in children with ASD. Nine francophone children with ASD and nine...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Studies with congenitally blind speakers show that visual deprivation yields increased auditory discrimination abilities as well as reduced amplitude of labial movements involved in vowel production, compared with sighted speakers. To further investigate the importance of auditory and visual feedback in speech, a study of auditory perturbation of r...
Article
Full-text available
The mechanisms underlying directional asymmetries in vowel perception have been the subject of considerable debate. One account—the Natural Referent Vowel (NRV) framework—suggests that asymmetries reflect a language-universal perceptual bias, such that listeners are predisposed to attend to vowels with greater formant convergence (Polka & Bohn, 201...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Studies have reported strong links between speech production and perception. We aimed to evaluate the role of long- and short-term auditory feedback alteration on speech production. Eleven adults with normal hearing (controls) and 17 cochlear implant (CI) users (7 pre-lingually deaf and 10 post-lingually deaf adults) were recruited. Short-...
Article
It is well known that vision plays an important role in speech perception. At the production level, we have recently shown that speakers with congenital visual deprivation produce smaller displacements of the lips (visible articulator) compared to their sighted peers [L. Ménard, C. Toupin, S. Baum, S. Drouin, J. Aubin, and M. Tiede, J. Acoust. Soc....
Article
This paper reports on the organization of the perceived vowel space in French. In a previous paper [1], we investigated the implementation of vocalic height contrasts along the F1 dimension in French speakers. In this paper, we present results from perceptual identification tests performed by twelve participants who took part in the production expe...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about infants' abilities to perceive and categorize their own speech sounds or vocalizations produced by other infants. In the present study, prebabbling infants were habituated to /i/ ("ee") or /a/ ("ah") vowels synthesized to simulate men, women, and children, and then were presented with new instances of the habituation vowel and...
Article
For human infants to engage in vocal learning, they must effectively monitor and assess their own self-produced speech, which entails perceiving speech produced by an infant. Yet, little is known about how infants respond to infant-produced speech. Here, we demonstrate that pre-babbling infants prefer listening to infant speech. Across four experim...
Article
Recent research shows that pre-babbling infants can recognize infant-produced vowels as phonetically similar to adult and child vowel productions (Polka et al., submitted), indicating that infants normalize for speaker size information. Yet little is known about whether infants encode information about speaker size in speech sounds and then use thi...
Conference Paper
Ultrasound (US) imaging is an effective and non invasive way of studying the tongue motions involved in normal and pathological speech, and the results of US studies are of interest for the development of new strategies in speech therapy. State-of-the-art tongue shape analysis techniques based on US images depend on semi-automated tongue segmentati...
Article
Purpose: The role of vision in speech representation was investigated in congenitally blind speakers and sighted speakers by studying the correlates of contrastive focus, a prosodic condition in which phonemic contrasts are enhanced. It has been reported that the lips (visible articulators) are less involved in implementing the rounding feature fo...
Article
In a previous paper [Ménard et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 126, 1406-1414 (2009)], it was demonstrated that, despite enhanced auditory discrimination abilities for synthesized vowels, blind adult French speakers produced vowels that were closer together in the acoustic space than those produced by sighted adult French speakers, suggesting finer contro...
Article
Since Lieberman and Crelin (1971), the question of vocal tract abilities and the link between anatomy and control has been the object of a number of conflicting papers. Part of the debate concerns the acoustic possibilities of the Variable Linear Articulatory Model (VLAM), an articulatory model that has provided the foundation of our own work for m...
Article
Full-text available
This paper investigates speech motor control maturity in 4-year-old Canadian French children. Acoustic and ultrasound data recorded from four children, and for comparison, from four adults, are presented and analyzed. Maturity of speech motor control is assessed by measuring two characteristics: Token-to-token variability of isolated vowels, as a m...
Article
Full-text available
In the congenitally blind (CB), sensory deprivation results in cross-modal plasticity, with visual cortical activity observed for various auditory tasks. This reorganization has been associated with enhanced auditory abilities and the recruitment of visual brain areas during sound and language processing. The questions we addressed are whether visu...