Lucie Debeffe

Lucie Debeffe
French National Institute for Agriculture, Food, and Environment (INRAE) | INRAE · Department of Forest, Grassland and Freshwater Ecology

Ph.D. Ecology

About

34
Publications
10,899
Reads
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599
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2018 - present
French National Institute for Agriculture, Food, and Environment (INRAE)
Position
  • Research Associate
October 2016 - December 2017
University of Oslo
Position
  • Fellow
July 2014 - June 2016
University of Saskatchewan
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
November 2009 - February 2013
September 2008 - June 2009
Paul Sabatier University - Toulouse III
Field of study
  • BioStatistic and Modelisation (BSM)
June 2006 - September 2008
Paul Sabatier University - Toulouse III
Field of study
  • Biodiversity Ecology and Evolution (BEE)

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Animals perceive human activities as risky and generally respond with fear‐induced proactive behaviors, to buffer the circadian patterns of lethal and nonlethal disturbances, such as diel migrations between risky places during safe nighttime and safer places during risky daytime. However, such responses potentially incur costs through movement or r...
Article
Full-text available
Migration of ungulates (hooved mammals) is a fundamental ecological process that promotes abundant herds, whose effects cascade up and down terrestrial food webs. Migratory ungulates provide the prey base that maintains large carnivore and scavenger populations and underpins terrestrial biodiversity (fig. S1). When ungulates move in large aggregati...
Article
Evolution should favour plasticity in dispersal decisions in response to spatial heterogeneity in social and environmental contexts. Sex differences in individual optimization of dispersal decisions are poorly documented in mammals, because species where both sexes commonly disperse are rare. To elucidate the sex-specific drivers governing dispersa...
Article
Full-text available
Although inter‐individual heterogeneity in many aspects of dispersal behaviour is widely reported, this key life‐history trait is predominantly modelled as a dichotomous state of philopatry versus dispersal. The increasing body of evidence for dispersal syndromes (i.e. a suite of correlated morphological, behavioural, and life‐history traits associ...
Article
Full-text available
1.Dispersal is a key mechanism enabling species to adjust their geographic range to rapid global change. However, dispersal is costly and environmental modifications are likely to modify the cost‐benefit balance of individual dispersal decisions, for example, by decreasing functional connectivity. 2.Dispersal costs occur during departure, transienc...
Article
Full-text available
Ongoing global warming is now affecting migratory cycles in a large variety of taxa in seasonally variable environments. Disruption of migratory systems can cause population decline and affect ecosystem function across the globe. It is therefore urgent to understand the drivers of migration and how the different fitness limitations of the sexes aff...
Article
Full-text available
Partial migration is common in a large variety of taxa in seasonally variable environments. Understanding the mechanisms underlying migration is important, as migration affects individual fitness. Migratory herbivores benefit from delayed forage maturation and hence higher food quality during migration and at their summer range, termed the forage m...
Article
Dispersal and migration are superficially similar large-scale movements, but which appear to differ in terms of inter-individual behavioural synchronization. Seasonal migration is a striking example of coordinated behaviour, enabling animal populations to track spatio-temporal variation in ecological conditions. By contrast, for dispersal, while so...
Article
Full-text available
Antipredator behaviours can be lost relatively quickly in populations that are relieved of predation, as is known for several species inhabiting islands. Flight initiation distance (FID) is often studied in the context of island tameness; however, little is known about the factors that influence and maintain FID variation in predation-free populati...
Article
Full-text available
Costs associated with reproduction are widely known to play a role in the evolution of reproductive tactics with consequences to population and eco-evolutionary dynamics. Evaluating these costs as they pertain to species in the wild remains an important goal of evolutionary ecology. Individual heterogeneity, including differences in individual qual...
Article
Full-text available
Because avoiding predation is crucial for fitness, foraging animals must trade acquisition of high-quality resources against risk avoidance when the best resources occur in locations with high predation risk. Although optimality models predict the distance at which an animal should initiate vigilance and flight, many studies have shown that animals...
Article
Sea-to-land nutrient transfers can connect marine food webs to those on land, creating a dependence on marine webs by opportunistic species. We show how nitrogen, imported by gray seals, Halichoerus grypus, and traced through stable isotope (δ15N) measurements in marram grass, Ammophila breviligulata, significantly alters foraging behavior of a fre...
Article
Dispersal is a key life-history trait governing the response of individuals, populations and species to changing environmental conditions. In the context of global change, it is therefore essential to better understand the respective role of condition-, phenotype-, and genetic-dependent drivers of dispersal behaviour. Although the importance of imm...
Article
Full-text available
In wild and domestic animals, gastrointestinal parasites can have significant impacts on host development, condition, health, reproduction and longevity. Improving our understanding of the causes and consequences of individual-level variation in parasite load is therefore of prime interest. Here we investigated the relationship between strongyle fe...
Article
Full-text available
Behavioural consistency is a key assumption when evaluating how between-individual differences in behaviour influence life history tactics. Hence, understanding how and why variation in behavioural repeatability occurs is crucial. While analyses of behavioural repeatability are common, few studies of wild populations have investigated variation in...
Article
Full-text available
Evaluating the costs and benefits of dispersal on individual life history is critical to understanding its importance to ecology and evolution. In feral horses (Equus ferus caballus), females may permanently move among breeding groups (bands) during their lifetime (termed social dispersal). Here, we assess costs and benefits of adult female social...
Article
Full-text available
Although theoretical studies have predicted a link between individual multilocus heterozygosity and dispersal, few empirical studies have investigated the effect of individual heterozygosity on dispersal propensity or distance. We investigated this link using measures of heterozygosity at 12 putatively neutral microsatellite markers and natal dispe...
Article
The way an individual reacts to the risk of predation or disturbance may have important consequences for its immediate and future survival. Risk is likely perceived differently by individuals in relation to among-individual differences in correlated behavioral traits, that is, syndromes or personalities. Given that animals can avoid the risk of pre...
Article
Full-text available
When individuals disperse, they modify the physical and social composition of their reproductive environment, potentially impacting their fitness. The choice an individual makes between dispersal and philopatry is thus critical, hence a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the decision to leave the natal area is crucial. We explored h...
Article
Full-text available
Breeding dispersal, defined as the net movement between successive breeding sites, remains a poorly understood and seldom reported phenomenon in mammals, despite its importance for population dynamics and genetics. In large herbivores, females may be more mobile during the breeding season, undertaking short-term trips (excursions) outside their nor...
Article
Full-text available
Parasite abundance has been shown to have major consequences for host fitness components such as survival and reproduction. However, although natal dispersal is a key life history trait, whether an individual's decision to disperse or not is influenced by the abundance of parasites it carries remains mostly unknown. Current and opposing hypotheses...
Article
Full-text available
Natal dispersal (i.e. movements between the natal range of an individual and its first breeding site) is a complex process which can have profound impacts on population dynamics. In most species, only a proportion of juveniles actually disperse, but few empirical data are available on the factors that drive the decision to disperse. To understand t...
Thesis
La dispersion, définie comme l'ensemble des mouvements qui éloigne les organismes de leur lieu de naissance de façon permanente, est un processus biologique fondamental de par son rôle déterminant dans la dynamique des populations. Dans la plupart des populations, tous les individus ne dispersent pas, et les individus qui dispersent ne sont pas un...
Thesis
Full-text available
Dispersal, defined as the movements that take individuals away from their birth site permanently, is a fundamental biological process that impact population dynamic and genetic. In most populations, not all individual disperse, and dispersers are not a random subset of the source population. The general aim of this thesis is to better understand...
Article
Full-text available
Natal dispersal is defined as the movement between the natal range and the site of first breeding and is one of the most important processes in population dynamics. The choice an individual makes between dispersal and philopatry may be condition dependent, influenced by either phenotypic attributes and/or environmental factors. Interindividual vari...
Conference Paper
In the last years the use of GPS loggers and data repositories has greatly enhanced our chances of understanding animal movements. Thus “movement ecology” represents now a fundamental paradigm for the interpretation of animal trajectories, linking, in an evolutionary context, behavioral traits with ecological conditions and using innovative statist...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The PATCH project is a fundamental research project, coordinated by Cécile Vanpé (postdoctorant) at the CNRS LBBE lab at Lyon. It also involves the CEFS and CBGP INRA laboratories at Toulouse and Montpellier, the Hunting and Wildlife National Agency (ONCFS) and the Swedish lab of Grimsö Wildlife Research Station. The project began in December 2012 and has lasted 40 months. It has benefited from an ANR funding of 373,514 €. Landscape modifications have been recognized throughout the world as a key issue affecting biodiversity. It is therefore critical to better understand how animal populations respond to environmental change and persist in modified environments. The impact of landscape changes can vary widely between species, depending on their habitat use requirements, diet and mobility. Some native species, called synanthropic species, can even benefit from anthropogenic landscape changes. Yet, although these species are often in expansion and are the object of major societal issues, the influence of habitat loss and fragmentation on these synanthropic species has received very little attention so far. The impact of landscape changes on behaviours remains also largely unknown. Yet, behavioural plasticity plays a key role in species adaptation to the rapid environmental changes caused by anthropogenic activities, because of the high reactivity and lability of behaviours. The PATCH project therefore aims at explaining how behavioural plasticity has enabled a primarily forest-dwelling species, the European roe deer, to colonize and flourish in human-dominated landscapes.