Luca Pollarolo

Luca Pollarolo
University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa / Université de Genève, Suisse · GAES-Archaeology / Laboratoire Archéologie et Peuplement de l'Afrique

PhD

About

33
Publications
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595
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Additional affiliations
October 2005 - December 2009
University of the Witwatersrand
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (33)
Article
Full-text available
The use of bone as raw material for implements is documented since the Early Pleistocene. Throughout the Early and Middle Pleistocene bone tool shaping was done by percussion flaking, the same technique used for knapping stone artifacts, although bone shaping was rare compared to stone tool flaking. Until recently the generally accepted idea was th...
Article
Full-text available
Excavated in 1949, Grotta dei Moscerini, dated MIS 5 to early MIS 4, is one of two Italian Neandertal sites with a large assemblage of retouched shells (n = 171) from 21 layers. The other occurrence is from the broadly contemporaneous layer L of Grotta del Cavallo in southern Italy (n = 126). Eight other Mousterian sites in Italy and one in Greece...
Article
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Hafting of stone tools was an important advance in the technology of the Paleolithic. Evidence of hafting in the Middle Paleolithic is growing and is not limited to points hafted on spears for thrusting or throwing. This article describes the identification of adhesive used for hafting on a variety of stone tools from two Middle Paleolithic caves i...
Article
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Abstract and depictive representations produced by drawing-known from Europe, Africa and Southeast Asia after 40,000 years ago-are a prime indicator of modern cognition and behaviour1. Here we report a cross-hatched pattern drawn with an ochre crayon on a ground silcrete flake recovered from approximately 73,000-year-old Middle Stone Age levels at...
Article
Full-text available
Having thrived in Eurasia for 350,000 years Neandertals disappeared from the record around 40,000–37,000 years ago, after modern humans entered Europe. It was a complex process of population interactions that included cultural exchanges and admixture between Neandertals and dispersing groups of modern humans. In Europe Neandertals are always associ...
Data
OSL dating of Grotta La Fabbrica and Colle Rotondo. (DOCX)
Data
X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis. (DOCX)
Data
Permissions from copyright holders. (PDF)
Article
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Cette 19ème année de recherches du programme « Peuplement humain et paléo-environnement en Afrique » constitue la première année du projet ANR-FNS CHeRCHA (Chronology of Rapid Climatic changes and Human adaptation in West Africa) et du projet FNS centré sur les dynamiques techniques des deux derniers millénaires dans la vallée de la Falémé. Cette m...
Article
Full-text available
We present here the results of a technological and typological analysis of the Acheulian and early Middle Paleolithic assemblages from Torre in Pietra (Latium, Italy) together with comparisons with the Acheulian small tools of Castel di Guido. The assemblages were never chronometrically dated before. We have now Ar/ Ar dates and ESR-U-series dates,...
Data
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Article
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La campagne de terrain de 2014 nous a confirmé l’extraordinaire potentiel de la vallée de la Falémé en termes d’histoire du peuplement et de variations climatiques et environnementales, et nous apporte de nombreuses données nouvelles, voire inattendues. Elle nous a aussi permis de découvrir de nombreux sites archéologiques jusqu’ici encore inconnus...
Article
Full-text available
The classification of archaeological assemblages in the Middle Stone Age of South Africa in terms of diversity and temporal continuity has significant implications with respect to recent cultural evolutionary models which propose either gradual accumulation or discontinuous, episodic processes for the emergence and diffusion of cultural traits. We...
Article
Full-text available
Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, proteomic and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) analyses of residue on a stone flake from a 49,000 year-old layer of Sibudu (South Africa) indicate a mixture of ochre and casein from milk, likely obtained by killing a lactating wild bovid. Ochre powder production a...
Article
Full-text available
Here we provide a multiproxy record of climate change and human occupation at Wonderkrater, a spring and peat mound site situated in the interior of southern Africa. Recently extracted sediment cores yielded a number of Middle Stone Age (MSA) artefacts, prompting exploratory excavation of the sediments to understand better the geomorphology of the...
Article
Kudu Koppie is a stratified late Earlier Stone Age and Middle Stone Age archaeological site located in the northern Limpopo Province of South Africa. The prepared core reduction strategies are described and temporal trends across the ESA–MSA boundary are presented. The prepared cores and endproducts of Kudu Koppie suggest that both the late ESA and...
Article
Full-text available
During construction of the new public interpretive centre at Maropeng for Gauteng Province's Cradle of Humankind early hominid sites, Early Pleistocene stone tools were unearthed from deposits now occupied by the marketplace and museum. Sealed between two thick clay-dominated colluvial deposits is a residual lag horizon which bears the artefacts. T...
Article
In the Mapungubwe National Park, near the confluence of the Shashe and Limpopo Rivers along South Africa's northernmost borders with Botswana and Zimbabwe, the site of Kudu Koppie is characterized by three lithologically and archaeologically distinct Stone Age units. From bottom to the top, these units are: (1) the Lower Kudu Koppie Unit (LKKU), wh...
Article
Full-text available
The oldest archaeological sites currently known in northernmost South Africa are found in the Mapungubwe National Park (formerly known as the Vhembe-Dongola National Park) and neighbouring farms, where there is a widespread distribution of open-air sites in deflated contexts. They are sealed by Holocene sands, which at some of the sites contain Lat...

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