Luca Cistrone

Luca Cistrone
Forestry and Conservation · Scientific Research

Doctor in Forestry Sciences

About

36
Publications
18,761
Reads
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1,137
Citations
Additional affiliations
June 2014 - June 2014
Distributed European School of Taxonomy (D.E.S.T.)
Position
  • Trainer in bioacoustic of bats at "Acoustic identification of bats" course
September 2007 - December 2007
University of Naples Federico II
Position
  • Teaching at "Biomonitoraggio e Gestione delle Aree Protette" course
Education
October 1995 - June 2003
Tuscia University
Field of study
  • Forestry and Environmental Sciences

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
One serious concern associated with the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is that the virus might spill back from humans to wildlife, which would render some animal species reservoirs of the human virus. We assessed the potential circulation of SARS-CoV-2 caused by reverse infection from humans to bats, by performing bat surveillance from different sites in Cent...
Article
Full-text available
Bats show responses to anthropogenic stressors linked to changes in other ecosystem components such as insects, and as K-selected mammals, exhibit fast population declines. This speciose, widespread mammal group shows an impressive trophic diversity and provides key ecosystem services. For these and other reasons, bats might act as suitable bioindi...
Article
Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a pervasive form of pollution largely affecting wildlife, from individual behaviour to community structure and dynamics. As nocturnal mammals, bats are often adversely affected by ALAN, yet some “light-opportunistic” species exploit it by hunting insects swarming near lights. Here we used two potentially competin...
Preprint
Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a pervasive form of pollution largely affecting wildlife, from individual behaviour to community structure and dynamics. As nocturnal mammals, bats are often adversely affected by ALAN, yet some “light-tolerant” species exploit it by hunting insects swarming near lights. Here we used two potentially competing pip...
Article
Bats show pronounced and often-adverse reactions to artificial illumination at night (ALAN) when commuting, roosting or foraging. ALAN also affects bat drinking activity, at least when lighting occurs over short intervals. We tested whether continuous illumination of drinking sites over 4-h periods would lead bats to tolerate ALAN and resume drinki...
Article
In recent years, bats have been found to harbour many viruses, raising several questions about their role as reservoirs and potential disseminators of zoonotic viruses. We investigated the presence of six virus families in bats in three regions of Central‐Southern Italy. Astroviruses were identified in seven of 13 bat species. Sequence analysis rev...
Article
Full-text available
In summer, many temperate bat species use daytime torpor, but breeding females do so less to avoid interferences with reproduction. In forest-roosting bats, deep tree cavities buffer roost microclimate from abrupt temperature oscillations and facilitate thermoregulation. Forest bats also switch roosts frequently, so thermally suitable cavities may...
Article
Artificial illumination at night (ALAN) alters many aspects of animal behaviour. Commuting and foraging bats have been found to be affected by ALAN, but no study has yet addressed the impact of lighting on drinking activity, despite its critical importance for bats. We experimentally illuminated cattle troughs used by drinking bats at four forest s...
Article
Bats broadcast rapid sequences of echolocation calls, named ‘drinking buzzes’, when they approach water to drink on the wing. So far this phenomenon has received little attention. We recorded echolocation sequences of drinking bats for 12 species, for 11 of which we also recorded feeding buzzes. Based on the different sensorial tasks faced by feedi...
Data
Barbastella barbastellus (above) and Rosalia alpina (below).
Article
Full-text available
Bats represent a major component of forest biodiversity. In forest, bats find many roosting and foraging opportunities. When foraging in forest, different bat species exploit a range of microhabitats according to their echolocation and flight style. When roosting, bats require sufficient numbers of suitable tree cavities. Overall, forest structure...
Article
Full-text available
Intra-sexual segregation is a form of social segregation widespread among vertebrates. In the bat Myotis daubentonii, males are disproportionately abundant at higher elevations, while females are restricted to lower altitude. Intra-male segregation is also known to occur yet its ecological and behavioural determinants are unclear. We studied male s...
Article
Organisms sharing the same habitats may differ in small-scale microhabitat requirements or benefit from different management. In this study, set in Italy, we focused on two species of high conservation value, the cerambycid beetle Rosalia alpina and the bat Barbastella barbastellus, which often share the same forest areas and in several cases the s...
Article
Competition may lead to changes in a species' environmental niche in areas of sympatry and shifts in the niche of weaker competitors to occupy areas where stronger ones are rarer. Although mainland Mediterranean (Rhinolophus euryale) and Mehely's (R. mehelyi) horseshoe bats mitigate competition by habitat partitioning, this may not be true on resou...
Article
Although open landscapes are typically regarded as inhospitable matrix for several species of forest bats, their role may be crucial for maintaining gene flow among otherwise isolated populations occurring in distant forest fragments. The barbastelle (Bar-bastella barbastellus) is a bat species previously known to depend on mature forest and dead t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Bat, Myotis daubentonii, constitutes an interesting model species as in several regions of Europe adult males are disproportionately abundant at higher elevations, while females are restricted to lower altitudes. Low-altitude males share summer roosts with females and may mate in summer as well as autumn. We studied the ecology of intra-male segreg...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Sexual segregation is observed in many bat species of temperate areas. Besides its ecological and evolutionary interest, sexual segregation has also significant consequences for species management as its knowledge may be crucial to tailor appropriate conservation plans. Daubenton’s bat Myotis daubentonii constitutes an interesting model species as...
Article
Individual identification of animals is of paramount importance to analyze population size, dispersal, habitat preferences or behaviour. Especially for sensitive, threatened species, it is advisable to develop non-invasive recognition methods avoiding direct handling and tagging of the study subjects to be applied to procedures such as marking-reca...
Article
Full-text available
Bats face a great risk of dehydration, so sensory mechanisms for water recognition are crucial for their survival. In the laboratory, bats recognized any smooth horizontal surface as water because these provide analogous reflections of echolocation calls. We tested whether bats also approach smooth horizontal surfaces other than water to drink in n...
Data
Echolocation sequence of a drinking barbastelle bat (Barbastella barbastellus). (a) spectrogram showing the approach and the terminal phases. The red arrow shows the noise produced when the bat makes contact with the water, which was clearly audible in many recordings made over water. (b) Interpulse interval (IPI) plotted vs. time of the same seque...
Article
Although bats are frequently admitted to rescue centres — mainly as orphans — very little information is available on their survival after release. Our study answered the following questions: i) do hand-reared bats survive over a short time; ii) which activities and habitat selection do they exhibit; iii) are bats loyal to the release area; and iv)...
Article
Despite the popularity of the saproxylic cerambycid Rosalia alpina as a flagship species, its ecology is still poorly know, especially in the southern part of its range. Detailed information on its habitat preferences is needed to plan appropriate management. We set our multi-ple spatial scale assessment of habitat preferences in a beech forest of...
Article
Despite the popularity of the saproxylic cerambycid Rosalia alpina as a flagship species, its ecology is still poorly know, especially in the southern part of its range. Detailed information on its habitat preferences is needed to plan appropriate management. We set our multiple spatial scale assessment of habitat preferences in a beech forest of c...
Article
Full-text available
Intensively managed forests are often seen as of low priority to preserve forest bats. The main conservation strategy recommended, i.e. saving unmanaged “habitat islands” from logging to preserve some suitable habitat, detracts conservationists’ attention from ameliorating conditions for bats in harvested sites. We studied the threatened bat Barbas...
Article
Aim Bats communicate by emitting social calls, and these often elicit reactions in conspecifics. Many such vocalizations are species-specific so that unambiguous signals can be transmitted and interpreted by conspecifics. In species-rich assemblages, evolutionary pressures might prompt interspecific diversification of call structure so that communi...
Article
The role of the forest canopy in protecting bats roosting in forest from predators is poorly known. We analysed the effect of canopy closure on emergence time in Barbastella barbastellus in a mountainous area of central Italy. We used radio-tracking to locate roosts and filmed evening emergence. Comparisons were made between roosts in open areas an...
Article
G. 2005. Spatial and temporal patterns of roost use by tree-dwelling barbastelle bats Barbastella barbastellus. Á/ Ecography 28: 769 Á/776. We evaluated the spatial and temporal patterns of roost switching behaviour by a tree-dwelling population of barbastelle bats Barbastella barbastellus in a beech forest of central Italy. Switching behaviour was...
Article
We investigated roost selection by Barbastella barbastellus in a mountainous area of central Italy. Twenty-five bats, mostly lactating females, were radio-tracked to 33 roost trees. Trees in unmanaged woodland were favoured as roost trees; woodland subject to limited logging was used in proportion to availability, and areas where open woodland and...
Article
Full-text available
The barbastelle bat, Barbastella barbastellus (Schreber, 1774) is a medium-sized, tree-dwelling vespertilionid classified as ?Endangered? in Italy; in western Europe it may be one of the rarest bat species. B. barbastellus shows roosting preferences that should be regarded as a key point in conservation protocols. We examined roost selection in a b...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
To explore habitat selection patterns and roosting behaviour of forest bats in order to support management decisions and achieve sustainable forestry
Project
a) Commuting and foraging bats are affected by artificial illumination, but nothing is known on the impact of lighting on bat drinking activity. b) Bats drink on the wing and artificial illumination might impair their skilful drinking manoeuvres. c) The goal of this project is to explore the reactions of drinking bats to artificial illumination in forests and deserts. Given the importance of drinking water for bats, artificial illumination at watersites might have major negative effects on bat conservation.