Louise M Soanes

Louise M Soanes
University of Roehampton | RU · Department of Life Sciences

21.74
 · 
Zoology
About
20
Research items
4,883
Reads
347
Citations
Introduction
Louise has been working on her Leverhulme funded Early career fellowship with the Roehampton University Behavioural and Ecology Lab (RUBEL) since 2013. Her current research interests focus on tropical seabird ecology, turtle and iguana conservation, marine park management and resiliency mapping of coastal habitats along with coastal restoration activities. As well as receiving Leverhulme postdoctoral funding, Louise has also managed and led Darwin Plus funded projects focusing on using seabirds to define Caribbean marine protected areas and improving the resiliency on small island communities in the British Virgin Islands. In addition Louise has worked on several EU BEST funded projects related to turtle and iguana conservation and marine park management.
Research Experience
Apr 2015 - Apr 2020
University of Roehampton
Position
  • Leverhulme Research Fellow, University of Roehampton
Jan 2013 - Jan 2015
University of Liverpool
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Projects
Projects (7)
Archived project
By the end of the project we will have provided comprehensive and rigorous data on the at-sea distribution and status of regionally and globally important seabird populations to the governments of Anguilla and the British Virgin Islands and established a self-sustaining seabird monitoring programme in each territory. In the longer term, this will enhance strategic sustainable marine planning in these UKOTs, ensuring both the conservation of globally important seabird populations, and the sustainable management of marine resources for the benefit of the people of Anguilla and the British Virgin Islands.
Archived project
Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship Seabirds are promoted as indicators of marine ecosystem health. However, understanding of the fundamental links between seabird breeding biology and the state of the marine environment is limited. In the tropics, there are often marked differences in breeding strategy between closely located colonies of the same species; a phenomenon that is unexplained. I will determine how local environmental and ecological conditions underpin variations in breeding strategy and foraging behaviour at both the individual and population level. This research will enhance our ability to utilise seabirds as bio-indicators and to predict future changes to seabird colonies resulting from climate change.
Project
Darwin Plus funded Following the devastating 2017 hurricane season, improving island resilience to extreme weather events is at the forefront of the BVI community’s mind. This project will promote the value of natural coastal+marine habitats in providing protection against future extreme weather. Focusing on the small inhabited island of Jost Van Dyke, we will assess the resilience of key terrestrial and marine habitats, establish environmental baselines, produce long-term management plans, increase awareness of the value of key habitats and implement resilience recovery measures.
Research
Research items (20)
Article
Knowing the spatial scales at which effective management can be implemented is fundamental for conservation planning. This is especially important for mobile species, which can be exposed to threats across large areas, but the space use requirements of different species can vary to an extent that might render some management approaches inefficient....
Article
Knowing the spatial scales at which effective management can be implemented is fundamental for conservation planning. This is especially important for mobile species, which can be exposed to threats across large areas, but the space use requirements of different species can vary to an extent that might render some management approaches inefficient....
Article
Full-text available
Population-level estimates of species' distributions can reveal fundamental ecological processes and facilitate conservation. However, these may be difficult to obtain for mobile species, especially colonial central-place foragers (CCPFs; e.g. bats, corvids, social insects), because it is often impractical to determine the provenance of individuals...
Poster
Full-text available
For colonial seabirds, nest site selection generally consists of choosing a suitable location among the wide range of available sites within the colony. Nest site-quality has the potential to influence fitness, by having an effect on breeding performance and output. Thus the selection of an appropriate nest site can be a trait determinant for an in...
Article
Full-text available
Marine spatial planning (MSP) has become an important tool to balance the needs of commercial, economical and recreational users of the marine environment with the protection of marine biodiversity. BirdLife International advocate the designation of marine Important Bird Areas (IBAs) as a key tool to improve the protection and sustainable managemen...
Article
Full-text available
The at-sea distribution of seabirds primarily depends on the distance from their breeding colony, and the abundance, distribution and predictability of their prey, which are subject to strong spatial and temporal variation. Many seabirds have developed flexible foraging strategies to deal with this variation, such as increasing their foraging effor...
Article
Full-text available
Recent international initiatives have promoted a number of different approaches to identify marine Important Bird and biodiversity Areas (IBAs), which are important areas for foraging, migrating or over-wintering seabirds. The ‘Foraging Radius Approach’ is one of these and uses known foraging range and habitat preferences to predict the size and lo...
Conference Paper
Whilst the legal framework for establishment of offshore Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) for seabirds in the European Union has existed for many decades, progress on designation of such areas has been slow, largely as a result of an inadequate evidence base upon which to identify qualifying areas. The recent increase in seabird tracking studies has s...
Conference Paper
The black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla) is one of the UK's most abundant seabirds but the population has declined by 60% since the 1980s. Declines have been linked to rising sea surface temperatures (SSTs) that are believed to affect recruitment and growth of the lesser sandeel (Ammodytes marinus), a key kittiwake prey species, in turn causin...
Article
Full-text available
As apex predators in marine ecosystems, seabirds may primarily experience climate change impacts indirectly, via changes to their food webs. Observed seabird population declines have been linked to climate-driven oceanographic and food web changes. However, relationships have often been derived from relatively few colonies and consider only sea sur...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last 12 years, the use of global positioning system (GPS) technology to track the movements of seabirds has revealed important information on their behaviour and ecology that has greatly aided in their conservation. To date, the main limiting factor in the tracking of seabirds has been the size of loggers, restricting their use to medium-s...
Article
Full-text available
Anguilla is a UK Overseas Territory, the northernmost of the island groups in the Lesser Antilles, in the eastern Caribbean. It has been long known for its seabirds; 16 species currently breed, with Red-billed Tropicbird Phaethon aethereus, Brown Booby Sula leucogaster and Sooty Tern Onychoprion fuscatus occurring in globally important numbers. The...
Article
Full-text available
Seabird tracking has become an ever more popular tool to aid environmental procedures such as the designation of marine protected areas and environmental impact assessments. However, samples used are usually small and little consideration is given to experimental design and sampling protocol. European shags Phalacrocorax aristotelis were tracked us...
Article
Full-text available
Seabird populations breeding in the UK Overseas Territories remain relatively understudied compared to UK seabird populations, despite their international importance. Here we present results from one of the first seabird tracking studies in the Caribbean region, of Brown Boobies Sula leucogaster breeding on the Important Bird Area (IBA) of Dog Isla...
Article
Full-text available
Colonial breeding is widespread among animals. Some, such as eusocial insects, may use agonistic behavior to partition available foraging habitat into mutually exclusive territories; others, such as breeding seabirds, do not. We found that northern gannets, satellite-tracked from 12 neighboring colonies, nonetheless forage in largely mutually exclu...
Article
In recent years, marine predator and seabird tracking studies have become ever more popular. However, they are often conducted without first considering how many individuals should be tracked and for how long they should be tracked in order to make reliable predictions of a population's home-range area. Home-range area analysis of two seabird-track...
Article
Full-text available
Capsule Yellow Wagtails successfully raised two consecutive broods in landscapes dominated by autumn-sown crops and did not require spring crops or fallow plots for later nesting.Aims To assess whether arable landscapes dominated by winter cropping provide habitats that allow Yellow Wagtails to raise two successful broods. To assess the utility of...
Article
Full-text available
Capsule Acoustic playback methods have been widely used to survey burrow-nesting petrels but playback stimuli typically yield low response rates. Digitally manipulated recordings of the calls of the European Storm Petrel were created with the aim of producing an acoustic “super-stimulus” which could be used to elicit a higher response rate to impro...