Louise Stevenson

Louise Stevenson
Oak Ridge National Laboratory | ORNL · Environmental Sciences Division

PhD

About

16
Publications
1,794
Reads
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280
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2020 - present
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • Associate Researcher and Environmental Toxicology Lab PI
August 2018 - March 2020
Bowling Green State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
July 2016 - July 2018
University of California, Santa Barbara
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
August 2010 - May 2016
University of California, Santa Barbara
Field of study
  • Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology
August 2005 - May 2009
Amherst College
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (16)
Preprint
Ecological risk assessment (ERA) is charged with assessing the likelihood a chemical will have adverse environmental or ecological effects. When assessing the risk of a potential contaminant to biological organisms, ecologists are most concerned with the sustainability of populations of organisms, rather than protecting every individual . However,...
Article
The chronic toxicity of an innovative Hg water treatment system using tin (Sn) (II) chloride (SnCl2) followed by air stripping was assessed through measurements of survival, growth, and reproduction rate in the freshwater cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia, a model species for toxicity testing. We first calculated the concentrations of Hg causing 25% re...
Article
Full-text available
Filtration rates (FRs) of the invasive Asian clam C. fluminea of various sizes ranging from 0.5 to 4.5 g whole-body weight were experimentally assessed under controlled laboratory conditions using two phytoplankton species of different sizes and biovolumes (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) as food. Overall, the FRs ran...
Article
Human activities can be powerful drivers of ecosystem change within catchments. While most long‐term catchment studies have been conducted at pristine sites, such studies are less common from sites more impacted by human activity. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed in the mid‐1980s t...
Article
Nutritional and contaminant stressors influence organismal physiology, trophic interactions, community structure, and ecosystem-level processes; however, the interactions between toxicity and elemental imbalance in food resources have been examined in only a few ecotoxicity studies. Integrating well-developed ecological theories that cross all leve...
Article
Coal ash contains numerous contaminants and is the focus of regulatory actions and risk assessments due to environmental spills. We exposed Daphnia magna to a gradient of coal ash contamination under high and low food rations to assess sub‐lethal effects of dietary exposures. While exposure to contaminants resulted in significant reductions in grow...
Article
A working group at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) explored the feasibility of integrating two complementary approaches relevant to ecological risk assessment. Adverse outcome pathway (AOP) models provide “bottom‐up” mechanisms to predict specific toxicological effects that could impact an individual's abi...
Article
Nano-zerovalent iron (nZVI) is widely used for its ability to remove or degrade environmental contaminants. However, the effect of nZVI-pollutant complexes on organisms has not been tested. We demonstrate the ability of a sulfidized derivative of nZVI (FeSSi) to sorb cadmium (Cd) from aqueous media and alleviate Cd toxicity to a freshwater alga for...
Article
Daphnia in the natural environment experience fluctuations in algal food supply, with periods when algal populations bloom and seasons when Daphnia have very little algal food. Standardized chronic toxicity tests, used for ecological risk assessment, dictate that Daphnia must be fed up to 400 times more food than they would experience in the natura...
Article
Full-text available
Shale development – extraction of oil and gas from shale rock formations using hydraulic fracturing or 'fracking' – has become a critical focus for energy debates in the US and UK. In both countries, potential industry expansion into new areas for shale extraction is expected to produce a wide range of environmental and social impacts and to change...
Article
Full-text available
Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) and its derivatives hold promise for remediation of several pollutants but their environmental implications are not completely clear. In this study, the physicochemical properties and aggregation kinetics of sulfide/silica-modified nZVI (FeSSi) were compared in algal media in which Chlamydomonas reinhardtii had bee...
Article
Full-text available
Phytoestrogens are produced by plants and may cause endocrine disruption in vertebrates. The present study hypothesizes that phytoestrogen exposure of female Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) may disrupt endogenous steroid levels, change agonistic behavior expression, and potentially also disrupt oocyte development. However, only the pharmaco...
Article
Full-text available
The vast majority of nanotoxicity studies measures the effect of exposure to a toxicant on an organism and ignores the potentially important effects of the organism on the toxicant. We investigated the effect of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on populations of the freshwater alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at different phases of batch c...
Article
Phytoestrogens are plant compounds that can act as endocrine disruptors in vertebrates. Biologically active levels of phytoestrogens have been found in aquatic habitats near wood pulp and paper mills, biofuel manufacturing plants, sewage-treatment plants, and agricultural fields. Phytoestrogens are known to cause hormonal and gonadal changes in mal...
Article
Full-text available
Pentaclethra macroloba (Fabaceae: Mimosoidea) is a dominant species of canopy tree in Costa Rica's Caribbean lowlands, constituting up to 40% of the local tree population in some areas. It has been suggested that P. macroloba's dominance is due in part to low post-dispersal seed depredation, as few terrestrial seed predators can tolerate the high c...

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