Louise K. Gentle

Louise K. Gentle
Nottingham Trent University | NTU · School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences

D.Phil Zoology

About

37
Publications
8,237
Reads
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447
Citations
Introduction
Louise K. Gentle currently works at Nottingham Trent University. Louise undertakes research in Behavioural Ecology and Wildlife Conservation, and writes popular science articles.
Additional affiliations
May 2004 - present
Nottingham Trent University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • Course leader for BSc (Hons) Wildlife Conservation Teach on modules including Behavioural & Evolutionary Ecology, Biodiversity Conservation, Field research, Experimental Design & Data Analysis, Dissertation, Behaviour
May 2003 - present
Nottingham Trent University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
October 2000 - December 2000
The University of Sheffield
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Full-text available
The fat reserves of small birds are built up daily as insurance against starvation. They are believed to reflect a trade-off between the risks of starvation and predation such that in situations of high predation risk birds are expected either to reduce their fat reserves in response to mass-dependent predation risk or to increase them in response...
Article
Full-text available
North America's Eastern corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) has been introduced to several islands throughout the Caribbean and Australasia where it poses a significant threat to native wildlife. Invasive snake control programs often involve trapping with live bait, a practice that, as well as being costly and labour intensive, raises welfare and et...
Article
Full-text available
The use of amplitudes to identify individuals has historically been ignored by bioacoustic researchers due to problems of attenuation. However, recent studies have shown that amplitudes encode identity in a variety of mammal species. Previously, individuality has been demonstrated in both fundamental frequency (F 0) and amplitude changes of captive...
Article
Full-text available
Many bioacoustic studies have been able to identify individual mammals from variations in the fundamental frequency (F 0) of their vocalizations. Other characteristics of vocalization which encode individuality, such as amplitude, are less frequently used because of problems with background noise and recording fidelity over distance. In this paper,...
Article
Pigeons (Columba li6ia) were trained on a visual discrimination task using a novel apparatus which enabled pinned specimens of insects, illuminated by natural daylight, to be presented under a pecking key transparent to ultraviolet light. Three birds showed evidence of learning to discriminate between sets of wasp and fly specimens. This response t...
Article
Full-text available
Heat-related illness (HRI) is predicted to increase in dogs due to rising global temperatures. This study evaluated retrospective VetCompass veterinary clinical records to explore geographical variability and ambient conditions associated with HRI events in UK dogs, and report the intrinsic (canine) and extrinsic (location, trigger, ambient weather...
Article
Full-text available
Raptors are often the cause of human-wildlife conflict because they may predate economically valuable species, and it is the perceived extent of predation that may augment conflict between raptors and people who keep and race pigeons. This study uses data obtained through questionnaires and an online raptor-attack reporting feature to investigate t...
Article
Full-text available
• Interspecific competition is an important evolutionary force, influencing interactions between species and shaping the composition of biological communities. In mammalian carnivores, to reduce the risks of negative encounters between competitors, species can employ a strategy of temporal partitioning, adapting activity patterns to limit synchrono...
Article
Full-text available
Effective conservation management requires an understanding of the spatiotemporal dynamics driving large carnivore density and resource partitioning. In African ecosystems, reduced prey populations and the loss of competing guild members, most notably lion (Panthera leo), are expected to increase the levels of competition between remaining carnivor...
Article
Full-text available
The seasonal occurrence and temporal sexual segregation of great white sharks Carcharodon carcharias have been widely documented in various temperate and sub-tropical waters across the globe. Yet, there is limited understanding of the relationship between the life stages and habitat use of C. carcharias , particularly in the Southern Cape. In this...
Article
Full-text available
Decline in global carnivore populations has led to increased demand for assessment of carnivore densities in understudied habitats. Spatial capture-recapture (SCR) is used increasingly to estimate species densities, where individuals are often identified from their unique pelage patterns. However, uncertainty in bilateral individual identification...
Article
Full-text available
Among species, coexistence is driven partly by the partitioning of available resources. The mechanisms of coexistence and competition among species have been a central topic within community ecology, with particular focus on mammalian carnivore community research. However, despite growing concern regarding the impact of humans on the behaviour of s...
Article
Full-text available
Abundance and density are vital metrics for assessing a species’ conservation status and for developing effective management strategies. Remote‐sensing cameras are being used increasingly as part of citizen science projects to monitor wildlife, but current methodologies to monitor densities pose challenges when animals are not individually recogniz...
Article
ABSTRACT.—Hawkfish (Actinopterygii: Perciformes: Cirrhitidae) are a family of carnivorous, coral-dwelling fishes. Some of these have been identified as obligate coral-dwelling, facultative coral-dwelling, substratum-dwelling, or water column-dwelling, depending on the species and habitat. Research on hawkfish density and habitat associations has be...
Article
Full-text available
Despite being classed as an asocial species, aggregations of sea anemones can be common in abundant species. UK populations of the geographically common aggressive intertidal sea anemone Actinia equina , form clustered aggregations notwithstanding a violent nature towards neighbours and relatives. Smaller in body size, and more abundant than those...
Article
Full-text available
Urban environments present wildlife with major challenges and yet surprising numbers of species have colonised towns and cities globally. Despite the growing realisation that urban centres can be important habitats for wildlife, why some species do better than others in urban environments remains poorly understood. Here, we compare the breeding per...
Article
https://theconversation.com/kamikaze-sperm-and-four-headed-penises-the-hidden-ways-animals-win-the-mating-game-90764
Article
Full-text available
Global urbanisation is rapidly increasing and can have profound impacts on wild flora and fauna. For many species, the impacts are detrimental and irreversible, whereas others are able to colonise and apparently thrive in these novel, human-made environments. Raptors are particularly susceptible to changes in the environment due to their position a...
Article
https://theconversation.com/five-comic-book-superpowers-that-really-exist-in-animals-81352
Article
Full-text available
Ghost crab (Ocypode species) burrow densities have previously been used as an indicator of anthropogenic impact. This study aimed to assess the burrow density of Ocypode species (O. ryderi and O. cordimanus) at four sites across Watamu Marine National Park, Kenya. Two sites were in front of hotel complexes (denoting a high degree of urbanisation),...
Article
https://theconversation.com/jungle-boogie-five-dancing-animals-who-know-how-to-strut-their-stuff-68948
Article
https://theconversation.com/the-houdini-honey-badger-and-other-surprisingly-clever-animals-59126
Article
https://theconversation.com/from-bosons-to-bigfoot-six-science-mysteries-that-might-be-solved-in-2016-51947
Article
We characterized 38 microsatellite loci in the European blackbird, Turdus merula. Thirty-seven loci were identified by testing 242 loci that had been originally isolated in other avian species. One additional locus was isolated from a European blackbird genomic library. All loci were characterized in 20-29 blackbirds from a population in the Czech...
Article
We have isolated 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci in the spotted hyena,Crocuta crocuta.The loci displayed between eight and 14 alleles in a minimum of 12 individuals tested. These loci will be used to investigate relatedness within social groups, the genetic structure of populations, sexual selection, and mate choice in spotted hyenas.

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Projects

Projects (6)
Project
This project aims to understand how peregrine falcons have responded to urbanisation in the UK. It uses long-term historical breeding data to compare the breeding performance of peregrines living in urban (town or city centres) and rural environments, and attempts to understand why differences might exist. Large-scale abundance and occupancy data has also been used to look at the effects of different land-uses on a national scale. The project also looks at the potential for human-peregrine conflict in urban areas and has used nest cameras and prey remain collections to further understand feeding behaviours of urban peregrines.