Louis Sicking

Louis Sicking
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam / Universiteit Leiden · Law Faculty VU Amsterdam / Institute for History Leiden

Doctorate in History University of Leiden 1996

About

59
Publications
1,931
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111
Citations
Citations since 2017
18 Research Items
73 Citations
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Introduction
Louis Sicking is Aemilius Papinianus professor of History of Public International Law at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and lectures medieval and early modern history at Leiden University. Louis does research in Political Economy, International History and Politics and International Relations. His books include Neptune and the Netherlands. State, Economy and War at Sea in the Renaissance (2004), which has been translated in Spanish in 2017 as L'Almirantazago y la armada de los Países Bajos durante los reinados de Felipe I y Carlos V, Colonial Borderlands. France and the Netherlands in the Atlantic in the Nineteenth Century (2008) and La naissance d'une thalassocratie (2015)His most recent publication is 'Introduction: maritime conflict management, diplomacy and international law, 1100–1800'.

Publications

Publications (59)
Article
Apart from details about youth and family, the focus of this interview with Boudewijn Sirks is on his academic career. After studying law, theology and philosophy, he graduated with a DPhil on an aspect of Roman administrative law. He then specialised in Roman law in all its aspects and in almost all of its periods of application. An extension of t...
Article
In the Middle Ages, goods washed up on the beach or fished up from the sea were an important economic asset. The customs and rules that determined the status of these goods are referred to as the ‘law of wreck’ or ‘right of wreck’. Several competing interest groups were involved: the local inhabitants as salvagers, finders or beach combers; merchan...
Article
Zuiderzee towns in the Baltic. ‘Vitten’ and ‘Vögte’ – Space and urban representatives in late-medieval ScaniaThe Scania peninsula in the southwest of present-day Sweden was one of the most important trading centres of medieval Northern Europe due to the seasonal presence of immense swarms of herring which attracted large numbers of fishermen and tr...
Article
Full-text available
In 1553 the Edward Bonaventure set sail from England with two other ships to search for a Northeast Passage to Asia. Eventually the ship made it to the White Sea and the captain of the ship, Richard Chancellor, reached Moscow where he met Tsar Ivan IV, ‘the Terrible’, at the Kremlin. In 1554 the ship returned to England but was ‘robbed by Flemings’...
Chapter
Full-text available
This wide-ranging theme takes Braudel’s concept of the “Mediterranean” as its starting point. Braudel’s vision of an enclosed sea as a geographical opportunity for economic integration between nations with different religions, languages and ethnicities and political bodies still functions as a model for studies on a wide range of contexts. The goal...
Article
Full-text available
De Jonker Fransen Oorlog teisterde Holland tussen november 1488 en augustus 1490. Deze opstand van Hollandse Hoeken onder leiding van jonker Frans van Brederode wordt vrijwel uitsluitend bezien in het gewestelijk perspectief van de Hoekse en Kabeljauwse twisten, die het Hollandse politieke landschap beheerste tussen 1345 en het einde van de vijftie...
Article
Piracy holds a special place within the field of international law because of the universal jurisdiction that applies: Any state may seize a pirate ship on the high seas and decide upon the penalties to be imposed, as is currently the case with Somali and West African pirates. Unlike today, piracy was the norm in pre-modern times. Maritime trade an...
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Full-text available
Maritime conflict management is the regulation of conflict in relation to the sea. It comprises conflict enforcement, conflict resolution and conflict avoidance. How did victims of maritime conflicts claim and obtain damages or demand compensation or reparation? The articles in this issue aim to shed light on this question from two distinct yet rel...
Article
Full-text available
This article discusses how merchants or skippers suffering losses aimed to get redress for damages in trading and shipping from or with Holland and Zeeland in the fourteenth and early fifteenth century within the context of Anglo–Dutch trade and diplomacy. In accordance with legal doctrine both the English king and the Count of Holland considered r...
Article
New Diplomatic History in the Premodern Age. An Introduction The study of medieval and early modern diplomacy has long been considered one of the most conservative subdisciplines in the field of history. During the last three decades, however, diplomatic history has undergone profound changes. This introductory article shows how these changes were...
Article
The importance of islands in maritime and global history is not yet understood in a comparative and long term perspective. This article aims to contribute to understanding the role of islands for the establishment, preservation and extension of maritime connections in medieval and early modern Europe, and beyond. Recognising that the nature of pre-...
Article
The duchy of Brabant and the counties of Flanders, Holland and Zealand were considered to be the beating heart of the Low Countries in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries: most of the population resided there, the degree of urbanisation was higher, and the industrial and artistic production was concentrated there. Truly maritime societies had dev...
Article
The duchy of Brabant and the counties of Flanders, Holland and Zealand were considered to be the beating heart of the Low Countries in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries: most of the population resided there, the degree of urbanisation was higher, and the industrial and artistic production was concentrated there. Truly maritime societies had dev...
Article
Introduction This chapter considers the question of how war at sea changed during the late-medieval and early-modern periods, and whether these changes constitute a ‘naval revolution’. It is now recognised by historians such as Carlo M. Cipolla, Jan Glete, John F. Guilmartin, and Geoffrey Parker that, during the period roughly between 1500 and 1650...
Article
Military historians must be quite familiar with The International Library of Essays on Military History as the volume being reviewed here is the 34th title in the series edited by Jeremy Black. Reprints of articles in the English language previously published in "key journals" concerning a certain field of military history are brought together in a...
Article
This article compares the Flemish and Dutch revolts in order to distinguish patterns of rebelliousness and to suggest causal explanations for rebelliousness. The comparative approach is of special importance: there has been a tendency to emphasize the unique character of the Dutch Revolt and of its leader on the one hand, and to consider this revol...
Article
This article compares the Flemish and Dutch revolts in order to distinguish patterns of rebelliousness and to suggest causal explanations for rebelliousness. The comparative approach is of special importance: there has been a tendency to emphasize the unique character of the Dutch Revolt and of its leader on the one hand, and to consider this revol...
Article
Holland within the Burgundian state This paper describes the fight waged by Philippe le Bon, Duke of Burgundy, to implement his power over Holland and the integration of the dukedom in the newly established Burgundian state. The fight between the legitimate heiress of the dukedom, Jacqueline of Bavaria, and Philippe le Bon was connected with the co...
Article
This paper describes the fight waged by Philippe le Bon, Duke of Burgundy, to implement his power over Holland and the integration of the dukedom in the newly established Burgundian state. The fight between the legitimate heiress of the dukedom, Jacqueline of Bavaria, and Philippe le Bon was connected with the conflicts between the Hoeken and the K...
Article
Au moment de la fondation de la Communauté économique européenne par le Traité de Rome, la France avait encore un vaste empire colonial. Peu avant la fin des négociations en 1957, la France a lancé la demande d'une association de ses colonies au marché commun comme condition sine qua non pour sa participation à la CEE. Cette demande ne peut qu'être...
Article
The present article, dedicated to Prof. J.Th. De Smidt on the occasion of his 80th birthday, discusses the case of Jacques du Gal, a French merchant, and the Netherlands privateers Claes de Doot and Meeus Pietersz from Flushing. The former departed from the harbour of Dieppe in France with one vessel, headed for Scotland. During this journey, on th...
Article
The present article discusses the case of Jacques du Gal, a French merchant, and the Netherlands privateers, Claes de Doot and Meeus Pietersz. The former departed from the harbour of Dieppe in France with one vessel, headed for Scotland. During this journey, on the open seas, Du Gal bought an English ship, denoted in the records as the Mary Dertenn...
Article
The present article, dedicated to Prof. J.Th. De Smidt on the occasion of his 80th birthday, discusses the case of Jacques du Gal, a French merchant, and the Netherlands privateers Claes de Doot and Meeus Pietersz from Flushing. The former departed from the harbour of Dieppe in France with one vessel, headed for Scotland. During this journey, on th...
Article
In the historiography of the colonial empires in the nineteenth century, much attention has been paid to the large European powers Britain and France. When the Dutch colonial empire is studied in an international context it is mostly in relation to the British empire. However, little or no attention has been given by scholars to Franco-Dutch coloni...

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Project (1)
Project
This transnational research project focuses on the analysis and comparative study of economic activities, port societies and armed conflicts in Atlantic ports between 1200 and 1520, involving researchers from several countries of the Atlantic arc. The fundamental hypothesis is that the medieval European Atlantic port network was a success because it was based on a series of factors, such as geographical conditions, infrastructures, highly dynamic societies and a governance adaptive to its peripheral position, issues analyzed in the previous research projects, but also that, in these Atlantic towns, economic activities related to the sea, both fishing and shipbuilding, but especially the transport of goods and people (men and women) linked to trade, as well as the services linked to them, such as port activities, storage, land transport, finance, insurance, security and naval and coastal surveillance, privateering, piracy and war, among others, were the key factors of the development and economic recovery of late medieval Atlantic Europe . The main goals of the project are: 1. Reflecting and debating about the theoretical and methodological issues of the economic activities of the Atlantic ports. 2. Studying, in a comparative and transnational way, the development and scope of economic activities and their relationship with societies, from a perspective of gender history, of the town ports, located on the peripheries of the European Atlantic arc. 3. Researching where, how, when, why and thanks to whom in the town ports of Atlantic Europe were given an economic specialization towards fishing activities (inshore, high altitude or mixed), transport (short and scopes), shipbuilding and repair, commercial exchange, piracy or others. 4. Analyzing the interactions between the economic activities related to the sea (fishing, trade, navigation, freight transport, privateering and piracy ...), the social groups that played a leading role and the institutions and forms of port government along the Atlantic coast of Europe. 5. Analyzing the Atlantic port environments and their relationship with economic development, human, social and technological progress, political relations and armed conflicts in the Europe of the 13th-15th centuries. 6. Analyze the role of merchants in the diplomatic relations of ports and states, as well as their ability to influence as lobbies in those places where they settled, especially in the resolution of conflicts. 7. Studying the above goals from a gender perspective, analyzing the role played by women in port economies and societies, in which they played a leading role. 8. Contributing positively and accurately to current debates about the role of Europe in the First Globalization 9. Producing contents and working instruments for the research of Atlantic port cities between 1200 and 1520 to be made available to the scientific community and the general public, such as plans and iconographic material of the Atlantic ports. This research project is funded by the Spanish Government, Ministery of Science and Innovation. Spanish Research Agency